Apple responds to reports of worn batteries forcing iPhone CPU slowdowns

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 173
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    It doesn’t read that way to me, that system performance is being dramatically crippled. It says only during peak loads which to me is not all the time and likely rarely noticed. The statements that people had to run benchmarks to verify seems to bolster that. 
    netmage
  • Reply 22 of 173
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    It doesn’t read that way to me, that system performance is being dramatically crippled. It says only during peak loads which to me is not all the time and likely rarely noticed. The statements that people had to run benchmarks to verify seems to bolster that. 
    When this happens it should be disclosed/flagged somehow to the user.
  • Reply 23 of 173
    Couldn’t iOS provide a first time warning message so users have the option of getting the battery replaced or living with the performance hit? Or maybe even have it be a setting so the user can choose? And how about building a battery health indicator? Apple needs to address this from a PR standpoint. I’ve got several friends with 6S complaining their device is slow. I’m for sure going to tell them to get the battery replaced.
  • Reply 24 of 173
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,987administrator
    Couldn’t iOS provide a first time warning message so users have the option of getting the battery replaced or living with the performance hit? Or maybe even have it be a setting so the user can choose? And how about building a battery health indicator? Apple needs to address this from a PR standpoint. I’ve got several friends with 6S complaining their device is slow. I’m for sure going to tell them to get the battery replaced.
    It could, sure. If iOS has the mechanism to throttle, it's got the ability to throw a flag to the user. We did suggest something like that in our conversations today, but it's not like we have any real pull inside Apple, I'm afraid.
    netmage
  • Reply 25 of 173
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    Yep. Either offer it as a setting where users can decide what trade off they want to make or disclose it then people can decide if they want to replace the battery or not. 
  • Reply 26 of 173
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,987administrator
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    Yep. Either offer it as a setting where users can decide what trade off they want to make or disclose it then people can decide if they want to replace the battery or not. 
    It's not quite that simple. The fix was to prevent phones from just shutting off under load. Seems to me, that it shouldn't be a toggle as a setting, and should just be a warning that it's happening, and when.
  • Reply 27 of 173
    Couldn’t iOS provide a first time warning message so users have the option of getting the battery replaced or living with the performance hit? Or maybe even have it be a setting so the user can choose? And how about building a battery health indicator? Apple needs to address this from a PR standpoint. I’ve got several friends with 6S complaining their device is slow. I’m for sure going to tell them to get the battery replaced.
    It could, sure. If iOS has the mechanism to throttle, it's got the ability to throw a flag to the user. We did suggest something like that in our conversations today, but it's not like we have any real pull inside Apple, I'm afraid.
    Well I hope Apple centric bloggers/podcasters use their contacts inside Apple to get this in front of the powers that be. This is one instance where I think transparency is very important. 
  • Reply 28 of 173
    sdw2001 said:
    The issue continues to not be a Apple-led conspiracy to force users to buy new hardware. Apple is not slowing down older devices to convince users to buy a new one. If it did, the throttling would be permanent, and a new battery would not solve the issue.


    I'm going to take issue with that.  Apple IS slowing down older devices, ostensibly to prevent shutdowns.  The throttling is absolutely permanent as long as the battery is not replaced.  I can't think of anyone who is going to replace their battery.  Apple may claim it doesn't throttle older hardware to force users to upgrade, but that is the net effect.  we know that because they just told us.  

    Sort of agree with both statements.  The whole thing could be side-stepped were Apple to show some transparency.  Maybe include a note on every iPhone's About > Legal screen along the lines of "The functioning of the lithium-ion battery in this device will lessen over an extended period that is dependent on usage frequency.  When the battery function reaches a certain threshold, IOS will need to adjust overall performance of the device to protect the hardware."
    netmage
  • Reply 29 of 173
    When my iPhone 6 started to suddenly shut down after 3 years I immediately suspected the battery, but was annoyed that there was no warning. With one of the updates I got a warning in my battery setting stating my battery had worn out. This confirmed my thoughts. With the later updates also the unexpected shutdowns were resolved. I guess it is a sign of good design when a product like this lasts for more than 3 years and of course also Apple learns during its product life cycles and cannot foresee everything!
    After replacing the battery myself for approx $ 25,- the phone starts a new life in my sons hands!
    From colleagues using Android phones I notice much shorter battery and product life span!
    equality72521racerhomie3caddyman33
  • Reply 30 of 173
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    Does your computer say SOMETHING when it is throttling? 
    macxpresscaddyman33
  • Reply 31 of 173
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    There is no
    tradeoff, the battery simply cannot provide the peek power the app requires without destroying the battery. Only solution is throttling or tripping up so physical protection on the battery circuit and shutting.
    this has all to do with docs in phone getting more and more powerful and bursty

    this is a false controversy as is usual when it comes to Apple 
    racerhomie3caddyman33
  • Reply 32 of 173
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,823member
    macxpress said:
    k2kw said:
    I don't understand how an iPhone 7 could have this problem already-  mine seems fine.  Apple should give the user a notification when they do that and let them know they can get the battery replaced.   Does AppleCare cover they battery replacement?   It should.

    All those android fans with their replaceable batteries will be crowing about this. 
    Nobody ever said this was happening with an iPhone 7. You totally read the article wrong if you're thinking that. Apple simply implemented that feature for iPhone 7 should it happen in the future. This was primarily tested with an iPhone 6, not an iPhone 7. 

    From what I read using the link below, battery replacements are only covered if you have AppleCare+ as a battery is considered a consumable item and the battery has to have 80% or less of consumable life which they can easily test for using their diagnostics program in store. The only exception is if they see where there's a defect, such as in the iPhone 6s battery replacement program and even then the battery must have had 80% of less consumable life left to get the battery replaced under the program. 

    https://www.apple.com/legal/warranty/products/ios-warranty-document-us.html (US/Canada/Mexico) Other countries may have different warranties. 

    I couldn't care less about what Android people think. Their battery life is horrible even with a good battery so honestly they don't really have a leg to stand on. 
    I guess we really need to do a spec/performance comparison between a random selection of Galaxy S6 s against Apple 6S and Galaxy S7 against the iPhone 7 to see who preforms best over time.  Maybe this is why my friend holds on to his Samsung S4
  • Reply 33 of 173
    I have another disclaimer for Apple in the interests of transparency ! "The lithium-ion battery in this device is going to degrade as fast as a scalded dog.  In the not-too-distant future, IOS will pass judgment on the battery and the sentence will be to render this device as slow as a week in the slammer."
  • Reply 34 of 173
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    Does your computer say SOMETHING when it is throttling? 
    Computers throttle for loads of reasons because of physical, mostly thermal, reasons . Îm betting drama queens crapping their pants over this are the same trolling YouTube comments and yes Reddit with all their adolescent fury while clutching most times a android device that even at the best of time is slower than those so called slowed down iPhones 
    pscooter63caddyman33
  • Reply 35 of 173
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,823member
    kimberly said:
    I have another disclaimer for Apple in the interests of transparency ! "The lithium-ion battery in this device is going to degrade as fast as a scalded dog.  In the not-too-distant future, IOS will pass judgment on the battery and the sentence will be to render this device as slow as a week in the slammer."
    I hope you meant scolded dog otherwise Apple will be accused of animal cruelty.
  • Reply 36 of 173
    I don't know how anyone can criticize Apple for doing this. I do think that they should have disclosed when this feature was added and how it works. But I would much rather my device slow down than shut down. If anyone is concerned about their phone slowing down, step-up and spend $79 for a new battery!
    racerhomie3netmage
  • Reply 37 of 173
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,823member
    mazda 3s said:
    I don't have a problem with the methods that Apple took. I have a problem with it not being disclosed. If you're going to put a device in "limp home" mode, you need to inform the user either with a notification (i.e. when an iPhone kicks into Low Power mode). I don't think that it's fair to dramatically cripple system performance and not say SOMETHING about it.
    It doesn’t read that way to me, that system performance is being dramatically crippled. It says only during peak loads which to me is not all the time and likely rarely noticed. The statements that people had to run benchmarks to verify seems to bolster that. 
    And here I was blaming the slow system on upgrading to the latest version after all those annoying messages.   It was really the hardware.

    maybe they need to hire some Tesla battery engineers.
  • Reply 38 of 173
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,718member
    The issue is Apple should’ve been for forthcoming on decisions like this. But it wouldn’t stop the conspiracy theories. 
    rogifan_newpropod
  • Reply 39 of 173
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,192member
    I’m okay with Apple’s strategy but please give us a battery health meter to remove the uncertainty. Not a big ask in my humble opinion. 
    rogifan_newpscooter63LukeCagemuthuk_vanalingamnetmage
  • Reply 40 of 173
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,001member
    jungmark said:
    The issue is Apple should’ve been for forthcoming on decisions like this. But it wouldn’t stop the conspiracy theories. 
    We all know Apple is doing this to make people upgrade to either an iPhone 8 or iPhone X. /s

    I bet there will soon be a lawsuit over this with some dipshit and some scumbag lawyer claiming this is what Apple is doing with no real proof what so ever. 

    Apple is damned if they do and damned if they don't. 
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