iMac Pro arrives at Apple's retail stores

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited December 2017
Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.

Apple iMac Pro


Apple had originally told the press that units could be on store shelves as soon as last week. Online orders began arriving Dec. 27.

Shoppers should check Apple's pickup availability before heading out, as some places still don't have the computer in stock. In those cases, outlets are typically quoting Jan. 11 as the next possible pickup date.

The default Pro also comes with 32 gigabytes of RAM, 1 terabyte of SSD storage, and AMD's 8-gigabyte Radeon Pro Vega 56 video card. Many upgrade options are available, such as a 10-core CPU, but 14- and 18-core machines aren't shipping until next month.

Aimed mainly at people doing tasks like 3D rendering, simulations, and video editing, the Pro is easily one of the more expensive products in Apple history. A top-end 18-core configuration will cost as much as $13,199.

Those looking to save on an iMac Pro purchase can also pick up the new desktop with no tax in most states. At press time, Abt Electronics is shipping the standard $4,999 configuration with no tax outside IL, IN, MI and WI, while B&H and Adorama have upgraded models in stock with no tax outside NY and NJ. For a full list of deals, please visit our iMac Pro Price Guide.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    I just received an e-mail from B&H, mine has been shipped for delivery on 1/3/2018.  Specked with a 10 core, 2 TB SSD, 64 GIG, and Vega 64/16G video card.  So built to order have already arrived.

    Mike
    bigpics
  • Reply 2 of 30
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,158member
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    StrangeDaysmacxpresspscooter63jony0
  • Reply 3 of 30
    wlymwlym Posts: 90member
    mdirvin said:
    I just received an e-mail from B&H, mine has been shipped for delivery on 1/3/2018.  Specked with a 10 core, 2 TB SSD, 64 GIG, and Vega 64/16G video card.  So built to order have already arrived.

    Mike
    Rumours are that Apple's releasing a special Rose Gold iMac Pro (with hot pink Magic Mouse) for Valentine's Day so I'm holding off ordering until then. Otherwise yours sounds like an okay machine.  ;-)
    DavidAlGregory
  • Reply 4 of 30
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    Indeed. The Apple Lisa launched in January 1983 for $9,995, which in today's dollars is $25,209. Clearly the iMP is a much better business machine at a fraction of the price.
    jony0
  • Reply 5 of 30
    VRingVRing Posts: 108member
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    edited December 2017 xzu
  • Reply 6 of 30
    Apple will sell a number of these to vanity buyers who can afford it. I live in Connecticut, and the only place around here today you can drive to buy one is Greenwich, one of the wealthiest towns in the U.S. Apple picked that store for a reason. I'll admit I'm tempted (20 minutes away), but there's other things I'd rather use that money for.
    DavidAlGregory
  • Reply 7 of 30
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,158member
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    pscooter63bigpicsjony0
  • Reply 8 of 30
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,971member
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    Besides the time and effort to buy parts from all over the internet, have them delivered, remove and dispose of all the packaging, put it all together, and install the Hackintosh OS on this Frankenmac, it's likely not worth it. Then, if you do have a component issue, you typically have to find the original receipt and contact the original online retailer or the original HW vendor and then send it in to be repaired or replaced when it's much easier to have Apple be the one-stop shop for all HW issues.

    There will always be fringe cases where building your own machines are cheaper, but if that the 1:10000000 slot a person falls into then they're foolish for even commenting on this thread.
    bigpics
  • Reply 9 of 30
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,631member
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Weren’t you the chap who priced it out a couple of weeks ago, but then got caught trying to sneak in a 4K screen and omitting Thunderbolt3?

    Besides which, DIY pricing is a pointless excercise as I suspect the proportion of IT creatives who build their own machines is only slightly greater than the proportion of taxi drivers who build their own cabs. 
    SolialandailBluntGG1pscooter63bigpicsjony0
  • Reply 10 of 30
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,971member
    Rayz2016 said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Weren’t you the chap who priced it out a couple of weeks ago, but then got caught trying to sneak in a 4K screen and omitting Thunderbolt3?

    Besides which, DIY pricing is a pointless excercise as I suspect the proportion of IT creatives who build their own machines is only slightly greater than the proportion of taxi drivers who build their own cabs. 
    🤣
    jony0
  • Reply 11 of 30
    Okay, where is the iFixit teardown?
  • Reply 12 of 30
    VRingVRing Posts: 108member
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    xzu
  • Reply 13 of 30
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,158member
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    The usual twiddling and manipulations to get the result desired. And the GMT-W7/300 you tout shows a price of $11,309.00 with no monitor. And as another has pointed out, no Thunderbolt 3. How dishonest can you get, troll. 
    alandailRayz2016pscooter63bigpicsjony0
  • Reply 14 of 30
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,158member

    Apple will sell a number of these to vanity buyers who can afford it. I live in Connecticut, and the only place around here today you can drive to buy one is Greenwich, one of the wealthiest towns in the U.S. Apple picked that store for a reason. I'll admit I'm tempted (20 minutes away), but there's other things I'd rather use that money for.
    What are you talking about? Are you completely unable to comprehend what this machine is? Are you really that ignorant? Vanity buyers? Really? You actually think this machine is for general use and is targeted at the general public? Come back when you have actually found out who this machine is for. Otherwise just keep quiet so you don;t come off as a clueless fool.
    jony0
  • Reply 15 of 30
    VRingVRing Posts: 108member
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    The usual twiddling and manipulations to get the result desired. And the GMT-W7/300 you tout shows a price of $11,309.00 with no monitor. And as another has pointed out, no Thunderbolt 3. How dishonest can you get, troll. 
    That's with a different configuration, but I'm sure you knew that. When you adjust to the specifications above, you come to $5,639. This is an Intel build, Thunderbolt 3 exists. If you go with the Threadripper / AMD route then you lose Thunderbolt 3.

    I post facts, not fiction. You may not like what I have to say, but I'm not wrong.
  • Reply 16 of 30
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    Yes, the iMac Pro uses appropriate CPU and GPU for its form factor. This is basic engineering. Don't use hardware that doesn't work in your design. If Apple could have used the base W-2145/2155/2175/2195, they would have. Instead, they used variants designed by Intel expressly for this purpose, for use in all-in-one workstations.

    Apple is on the cutting edge here. They aren't always but in this case they are. That's what is so frustrating about your continued insistence that an all-in-one should be compared to a regular desktop, which is what you are doing. The fact that a "regular" desktop is both cheaper and more powerful than an all-in-one is OBVIOUS. The fact you think people here need to be educated about this is ABSURD.

    The question here, which you keep obstructing when you hijack these threads, is how many of these things is Apple going to sell? Is this basically a new market -- the HPC all-in-one? The market for DIY machines is tiny and completely irrelevant to the market for all-in-ones. Nor is the "regular" desktop workstation market especially helpful. The big questions are things like, will HP or Dell or one of the East Asian companies try to compete with this? Will Microsoft do anything?
    pscooter63
  • Reply 17 of 30
    BluntBlunt Posts: 224member
    Only trolls talk about DIY. Pros don't give a shit they want an elegant solution and Apple delivered. 
    alandailGG1mavemufc
  • Reply 18 of 30
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    Are you really trying to compare this:



    to this

    Related image

    seriously?
    Rayz2016netrox
  • Reply 19 of 30
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    You assume everyone with hpc requirements is a high paid “professional”. There is a large number of graduate students in engineering and scientific computing that conduct important research in their fields that don’t make a lot of money or have big work budgets. This research requires far more computing power than is required by many high paid “professionals” in other fields. I was under the impression that at one time Apple had a strong interest in supporting and being involved in university research but maybe I was wrong.
    VRing
  • Reply 20 of 30
    alandail said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    VRing said:
    lkrupp said:
    Customers who can afford its $4,999 pricetag may now be able to find the 8-core base model of the iMac Pro in some U.S. Apple stores, ready for pickup.
    Why do we keep with the narrative that this machine might be purchased by common users? Why do we keep mentioning the price? The real professional who makes a living with a machine like this one will pay the price. And it’s not too expensive when you consider what’s inside the beast. I’m surprised AI or someone else hasn’t priced out a PC with the exact same specs and 5K monitor, if such an animal even exists. 
    You can't price out the exact same specs.  The CPU and GPU are down clocked versions of their off the shelf counterparts. 

    For example, the Vega 64 iMac Pro is outputting about the same TFLOPS as the off the shelf Vega 56. So it's not going to be a tit-for-tat comparison.

    If you want to price out a DIY desktop, you can easily build a better one for less than the iMac Pro.

    Pre-built computers become a bit more complicated, again, because of the availability of parts and the fact the iMac Pro is using weaker components.
    Oh, and a “professional” is going build a DYI with off the self parts? How productive and cost effective would that be? As for your claim that you can ‘easily’ build a better one for less, that tripe has been debunked many times by people who have tried and failed to do it. There is no Apple ‘tax’ on this machine at this level. 
    The DIY route is more for the prosumer, or at home computers. For that matter, a professional probably won't buy a prosumer all-in-one computer like the iMac Pro. They'll likely buy an ISV certified workstation with a 3 year on-site warranty, potentially purchased through an IT department from HP, Lenovo or Dell.

    As for easily building a better computer, well, here's a prebuilt to compare:

    iMac Pro - $7999

    Intel Xeon W-2150B (10 core) <-- Downclocked from regular W-2155
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 16 GB HBM2 (up to 4 displays) <-- Downclocked from regular Vega 64
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    10 Gb Ethernet
    macOS
    1 year warranty

    GMT-W7/300 (source) - $5,639

    Intel Xeon W-2155 (10 core)
    AMD Radeon Pro Vega Frontier Edition 16 GB HBM2 (up to 6 displays)
    64 GB DDR4-2666 ECC
    2 TB PCIe M.2 SSD
    2x 10 Gb Ethernet
    Windows 10 Pro
    1 year warranty

    That leaves $2,360 for a monitor, keyboard and mouse. As for the display, something like the new 2018 5K LG Nano IPS display would be better than the iMac Pro's display (same as the LG UltraFine 5K). Or you can drop the resolution and go for a Dell UP2718K with local dimming (not edge-lit).

    The end result is a desktop that's more powerful and won't suffer from throttling like the iMac Pro. It also has a better display (or options for different display configurations depending on the work required).

    The DIY route would go with something like Threadripper which is even more powerful than the Xeon W-2155 and offers 64 PCIe lanes.

    I also want to note, if ECC RAM is not needed, an i9-7900X is identical to the W-2155. So the cost savings and options grow considerably.
    Are you really trying to compare this:



    to this

    Related image

    seriously?
    Is looks what’s important? Is the purpose of a hpc machine to do work or to take out on a date?
    VRingxzu
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