Another test finds HomePod frequency response flat, but results potentially meaningless

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  • Reply 121 of 123
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,283member
    Thanks for that Dick. Agreed it's all a bit unclear with so many competing claims and such. One thing I noted is that Apple reportedly says only one microphone is dedicated to reflected tone and sound adjustment based on the listening space, the other 6 are for "listening" for Siri. That's counter to what iMore says.

    FWIW I think the "spatial awareness" mention is pretty clear IMHO. It's the initial adjustment phase when the HomePod is first placed or subsequently moved. I don't think the HomePod does so again if you were to switch furniture around in the room or even stuff it full of pillows while leaving the HomePod unmoved. To get it to re-evaluate the listening space requires at least a little shake of the HomePod to "wake" the function.

    Now with that said I do think that like the Home Max it's monitoring the low-end with that microphone, the "woofer" so to speak, to better control and minimize bass distortion. I've not seen any substantiated claim anywhere that HomePod is doing the same in real time for the tweeters. But sure it's possible I suppose even if Apple doesn't mention it. Knowing Apple as well as you do tho wouldn't you expect Apple to clearly say so? They don't miss many marketing opportunities. 
    edited February 2018
  • Reply 122 of 123
    gatorguy said:
    Thanks for that Dick. Agreed it's all a bit unclear with so many competing claims and such. One thing I noted is that Apple reportedly says only one microphone is dedicated to reflected tone and sound adjustment based on the listening space, the other 6 are for "listening" for Siri. That's counter to what iMore says.

    I looked for that -- can you post a link?

    FWIW I think the "spatial awareness" mention is pretty clear IMHO. It's the initial adjustment phase when the HomePod is first placed or subsequently moved. I don't think the HomePod does so again if you were to switch furniture around in the room or even stuff it full of pillows while leaving the HomePod unmoved. To get it to re-evaluate the listening space requires at least a little shake of the HomePod to "wake" the function.

    We disagree.  In my experiments, I placed the HomePod on a coffee table in the family room more towards the back of the room.  It was closer to the fireplace, TV bookcase... Further away are 2 couches, 2 easy chairs, 2 windows, firewood and it is open to the kitchen area (about the same size room).  I walked around the HomePod stopping at various positions -- I was obviously standing in front of walls, fireplace, furniture, etc. that were considered for adjustment settings when the  HomePod was placed on the coffee table. I didn't move furniture or pillows around -- I moved me around and changed the characteristics of the space.  The HomePod sounded the same wherever I stood -- If it's not dynamically the space, it's doing something.

    If you can get your hands on a HomePod for evaluation, a little experimentation might convince you.

    Now with that said I do think that like the Home Max it's monitoring the low-end with that microphone, the "woofer" so to speak, to better control and minimize bass distortion. I've not seen any substantiated claim anywhere that HomePod is doing the same in real time for the tweeters. But sure it's possible I suppose even if Apple doesn't mention it. Knowing Apple as well as you do tho wouldn't you expect Apple to clearly say so? They don't miss many marketing opportunities. 

    Not really!  Apple tends to under promise and over deliver -- and go light (or nebulous) on specs -- especially in the iPhone era.  It is obvious that the HomePod was released before the audio software/firmware was complete. Knowing Apple, they would be pretty cryptic with some tech definitions that are yet to be realized.

    FWIW, on the developer site there is no sample code or up-to-date docs for Airplay 2.   There is a WWDC 2017 video that shows how to perform various Airplay 2 functions...  But they skip over a lot, saying it will be covered in the sample code -- which, AFAICT, has yet to be released.

    https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2017/509/
    edited February 2018
  • Reply 123 of 123
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,283member
    gatorguy said:
    Thanks for that Dick. Agreed it's all a bit unclear with so many competing claims and such. One thing I noted is that Apple reportedly says only one microphone is dedicated to reflected tone and sound adjustment based on the listening space, the other 6 are for "listening" for Siri. That's counter to what iMore says.

    I looked for that -- can you post a link?

    FWIW I think the "spatial awareness" mention is pretty clear IMHO. It's the initial adjustment phase when the HomePod is first placed or subsequently moved. I don't think the HomePod does so again if you were to switch furniture around in the room or even stuff it full of pillows while leaving the HomePod unmoved. To get it to re-evaluate the listening space requires at least a little shake of the HomePod to "wake" the function.

    We disagree.  In my experiments, I placed the HomePod on a coffee table in the family room more towards the back of the room.  It was closer to the fireplace, TV bookcase... Further away are 2 couches, 2 easy chairs, 2 windows, firewood and it is open to the kitchen area (about the same size room).  I walked around the HomePod stopping at various positions -- I was obviously standing in front of walls, fireplace, furniture, etc. that were considered for adjustment settings when the  HomePod was placed on the coffee table. I didn't move furniture or pillows around -- I moved me around and changed the characteristics of the space.  The HomePod sounded the same wherever I stood -- If it's not dynamically the space, it's doing something.

    If you can get your hands on a HomePod for evaluation, a little experimentation might convince you.

    Now with that said I do think that like the Home Max it's monitoring the low-end with that microphone, the "woofer" so to speak, to better control and minimize bass distortion. I've not seen any substantiated claim anywhere that HomePod is doing the same in real time for the tweeters. But sure it's possible I suppose even if Apple doesn't mention it. Knowing Apple as well as you do tho wouldn't you expect Apple to clearly say so? They don't miss many marketing opportunities. 

    Not really!  Apple tends to under promise and over deliver -- and go light (or nebulous) on specs -- especially in the iPhone era.  It is obvious that the HomePod was released before the audio software/firmware was complete. Knowing Apple, they would be pretty cryptic with some tech definitions that are yet to be realized.

    FWIW, on the developer site there is no sample code or up-to-date docs for Airplay 2.   There is a WWDC 2017 video that shows how to perform various Airplay 2 functions...  But they skip over a lot, saying it will be covered in the sample code -- which, AFAICT, has yet to be released.

    https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2017/509/
    Dick I 100% agree with you that the sound may be very consistent as you move about the room. That's what the initialization phase is supposed to do, get a phonic lay of the land. That does not mean that the HomePod then continues to do so dynamically in real time. In fact that the HomePod is described by Apple as remapping the room when it is moved would indicate just the opposite: It is NOT continuously doing so. 

    Anyway there's a link right here at AI that says pretty much the same as I've said. I'll use that one for now since I'm sure the site leadership would prefer I link their own resources first. I'll give you another if need be tho. 
    https://appleinsider.com/futures/homepod
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