Apple's new US campus most likely to spring up in northeast, report argues

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With the company having ruled out California and Texas, Apple's next big U.S. campus is most likely to pop up in a northeastern state, a report argued on Wednesday.




Those candidates include the likes of New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C., Bloomberg said. In choosing those states, the business publication considered cities where Apple already has a corporate presence, and the 15 top cities in terms of tax handouts and strong local business environments, as judged by Moody's Analytics.

There are potential states further afield, among them Florida, Illinois, Washington, and Wisconsin. The northeast would have extra advantages however, particularly the ability to take tech support calls before the company's existing support centers open in Austin, Tex. and Elk Grove, Calif. Apple has said that the new campus will initially focus on AppleCare.

The northeast also has plentiful public transporation networks, and large concentrations of domestic suppliers -- 804 in New York, 379 in Massachusetts, and 253 in Pennsylvania. Illinois (493) and Ohio (194) also have significant supplier networks.

The campus is part of an Apple pledge to pump $350 billion into the U.S. economy during the next five years, other contributions including a $38 billion tax payment on repatriated foreign reserves, and manufacturing and data center investments.

The list is very similar, but not identical, to Amazon's declared second headquarters candidates.

Unlike Amazon's HQ2, Apple has said it will avoid any auction-like process. The company has already narrowed down its list of cities without making the list public -- a formal announcement should be made later this year.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 605member
    I truly hope Apple has no plans on coming to New York City. Facebook and Google's is destroying my neighborhood, raising rents like crazy, festering chain stores and restaurants like Shake Shack which tech nerds apparently can't live without. Corporate welfare as in big tax incentives just mean citizens pay more in taxes, rents and cost of living expenses so the richest companies in the world get richer. 
  • Reply 2 of 20
    netmagenetmage Posts: 220member
    Tax incentives bring in tax revenue that wouldn't otherwise be available from New job creation, they don't cost anyone at all. If taxes are raised in a locality due to an influx of new citizens than that is local government failing to fund itself properly and would happen regardless of the reason for the influx.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 3 of 20
    netmagenetmage Posts: 220member
    Disappointed that Southern VA / Northern NC isn't in consideration like for Amazon. 
  • Reply 4 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,064member
    spice-boy said:
    I truly hope Apple has no plans on coming to New York City. Facebook and Google's is destroying my neighborhood, raising rents like crazy, festering chain stores and restaurants like Shake Shack which tech nerds apparently can't live without. Corporate welfare as in big tax incentives just mean citizens pay more in taxes, rents and cost of living expenses so the richest companies in the world get richer. 
    I disagree. I would really like to see it here in NYC. You don’t know much about business, apparently. With your thinking, all big businesses should leave the city. Then everything would be really cheap because no one would want to live here.
    edited March 7 jony0bshank
  • Reply 5 of 20
    Funny use of language in the headline and teaser.  I don't think an Apple campus is going to "spring up" or "pop up" anywhere.  I expect it will be a much more deliberative and active process.  But perhaps I'm wrong and 3 months from now a campus will appear out of nowhere.  I suppose that would be exciting.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    payecopayeco Posts: 158member
    spice-boy said:
    I truly hope Apple has no plans on coming to New York City. Facebook and Google's is destroying my neighborhood, raising rents like crazy, festering chain stores and restaurants like Shake Shack which tech nerds apparently can't live without. Corporate welfare as in big tax incentives just mean citizens pay more in taxes, rents and cost of living expenses so the richest companies in the world get richer. 
    These are phone/internet support jobs, not your typical tech jobs that pay huge salaries like you’re thinking of. These would be more average salaries. That would also probably rule NYC out though because they’d have to pay higher salaries here to compensate for the higher cost of living compared to another Northeast city like, say, Boston, Pittsburgh or Philly.
  • Reply 7 of 20
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 29,909member
    It’s a nor’easter!
  • Reply 8 of 20
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,629member
    netmage said:
    Tax incentives bring in tax revenue that wouldn't otherwise be available from New job creation, they don't cost anyone at all. If taxes are raised in a locality due to an influx of new citizens than that is local government failing to fund itself properly and would happen regardless of the reason for the influx.
    Not so. After some years of running a film tax credit here in LA (not L.A.) the state determined we were losing money in the deal and couldn’t offer our citizens needed services while the film studios prospered. Program was ended. 

    All welfare comes from somewhere, corporate welfare is no exception. 
    JWSC
  • Reply 9 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,064member
    netmage said:
    Tax incentives bring in tax revenue that wouldn't otherwise be available from New job creation, they don't cost anyone at all. If taxes are raised in a locality due to an influx of new citizens than that is local government failing to fund itself properly and would happen regardless of the reason for the influx.
    Not so. After some years of running a film tax credit here in LA (not L.A.) the state determined we were losing money in the deal and couldn’t offer our citizens needed services while the film studios prospered. Program was ended. 

    All welfare comes from somewhere, corporate welfare is no exception. 
    It’s not that simple either. Apple now has over 10,000 people in their Texas help line center. I think their expansion is supposed to get to 16,000, or so. So if they put another one here, there could be another 5,000, or even double that. That’s a fair number of Jobs. Then there are higher paid personnel, such as management, technical staff and such. Local businesses in the area will perk up, and new ones will open. In the long run the city will benefit. Maybe for some programs where just a few hires are made, the math doesn’t work out, but otherwise it does.
  • Reply 10 of 20
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 605member
    melgross said:
    spice-boy said:
    I truly hope Apple has no plans on coming to New York City. Facebook and Google's is destroying my neighborhood, raising rents like crazy, festering chain stores and restaurants like Shake Shack which tech nerds apparently can't live without. Corporate welfare as in big tax incentives just mean citizens pay more in taxes, rents and cost of living expenses so the richest companies in the world get richer. 
    I disagree. I would really like to see it here in NYC. You don’t know much about business, apparently. With your thinking, all big businesses should leave the city. Then everything would be really cheap because no one would want to live here.
    I have run my own business for nearly 20 years. I know something about big cities having lived in NY for nearly 40. To sustain a city like my town the answer is not just have large corporations, it is about diversity of small and mid size which actually make a city a vial place. The working and middle class make up most cities however we are being forced out with property taxes, commercial rents which commonly now double and triple and landlords refusing to renew leases. Small business employ more Americans than these shiny big international corporations but the general public believes the exact opposite. 

    City and state officials get to brag during campaigns about all those jobs they created by making deals with these giants while in reality the working class is losing out. 
    If you don't live in a city experiencing hyper gentrification than nothing I say will mean anything to you. To give you an example of how bad sucking up to huge corporations promising great jobs look at the destruction Walmart has done to small cities in the USA. With big tax breaks they set up shop, undercut every small business in town which employs locals. Small business soon close and the only option for employment or shopping is Walmart. Once the tax incentives have expired Walmart will ditch that store and move to the next town offering them a tax break. 
  • Reply 11 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,064member
    spice-boy said:
    melgross said:
    spice-boy said:
    I truly hope Apple has no plans on coming to New York City. Facebook and Google's is destroying my neighborhood, raising rents like crazy, festering chain stores and restaurants like Shake Shack which tech nerds apparently can't live without. Corporate welfare as in big tax incentives just mean citizens pay more in taxes, rents and cost of living expenses so the richest companies in the world get richer. 
    I disagree. I would really like to see it here in NYC. You don’t know much about business, apparently. With your thinking, all big businesses should leave the city. Then everything would be really cheap because no one would want to live here.
    I have run my own business for nearly 20 years. I know something about big cities having lived in NY for nearly 40. To sustain a city like my town the answer is not just have large corporations, it is about diversity of small and mid size which actually make a city a vial place. The working and middle class make up most cities however we are being forced out with property taxes, commercial rents which commonly now double and triple and landlords refusing to renew leases. Small business employ more Americans than these shiny big international corporations but the general public believes the exact opposite. 

    City and state officials get to brag during campaigns about all those jobs they created by making deals with these giants while in reality the working class is losing out. 
    If you don't live in a city experiencing hyper gentrification than nothing I say will mean anything to you. To give you an example of how bad sucking up to huge corporations promising great jobs look at the destruction Walmart has done to small cities in the USA. With big tax breaks they set up shop, undercut every small business in town which employs locals. Small business soon close and the only option for employment or shopping is Walmart. Once the tax incentives have expired Walmart will ditch that store and move to the next town offering them a tax break. 
    I know about running businesses. I had two. The first had 43 people, and the second, 85. I still disagree with you.  One thing has nothing to do with the other, unless, specifically, that big business would drive out small businesses with more workers than the big business would add. It’s more than that, of course, but that’s a major part of the math.

    i did mention that I live in NYC. Maybe you didn’t read that. I’ve lived here my entire 68 years, so I know the city pretty well.

    when a large company decides to come in, as Apple may, they have good reasons. If Apple could employ 10,000 people in another major call center, that would be a very good thing. A large number of these employees would be those with qualifications who are out of work. Some could be on unemployment, costing the system. Others could be off unemployment, costing the system, including, possibly, family and friends. The majority could come from other Jobs. Possibly they would like to work for a large company with healthcare, other benefits, and a good pension. Many of the things a large company offers, small companies can’t, or just don’t.

    people leaving those other jobs would cause a vacuum, with those employers now required to hire replacements. This would be in the same situation, some unemployed, some employed. Down the line is a large net increase in employment, with the resulting taxes paid, additional business springing up, and current businesses enjoying higher sales.

    you seem to have some hate for large corporations that is clouding your judgement. While some of those companies aren’t the best, others are very good. There is always reason to be happy about opportunity for increased employment in an area, which is why companies are wined and dined to get them to come.

    i can give you one situation that I personally know of. My friends own a hardware store in lower Manhattan. They service individuals, conpanies and building managements. When Home Depot opened their store, not far away, on 23rd st, there was concern from a number of small businesses in the area, and, yes, some were hurt. That’s to be expected with any increased competition, even another small business opening up nearby. They were told that as a hardware store, they could be put out of business, and for several months, business was down.

    but an amazing thing occurred. Business picked up again, even to levels above what it was before. Why? Because they offered product and services Home Depot didn’t. Once customers realized that, they got more business than before. What did they do? They reoriented their inventory, and their services to best fit the new situation, and it worked. 

    Instead of crying about it, they analyzed the situation, and came up with a response.

    while not every business can do that, many can, and do.

    i don’t even understand what Apple has to do with this, as what they do isn’t done by any other business here, and so they will be a net asset, not a detriment.
    edited March 7 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 12 of 20
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 605member
    Are you aware of NY's Mayor's plans to re-zone area's of the East and Greenwich Village neighborhoods to accommodate his vision of a "Silicon Alley" extension from Union Sq to Astor Place? This is an important historic area along Broadway and 4th Ave. Office buildings are planned for 3rd Avenue which will be occupied by tech companies which will forever change this area and force more small businesses and working class residents out of homes many have lived in their entire lives. The people coming to work for Google and Facebook do not support small businesses, they in most part are not native New Yorkers and like sterile corporate looking place to eat and buy their toothpaste. The city is looking more like a mid-wester shopping mall everyday, bland storefronts of glass with slick logos, and endless repeat of Starbucks spaced 4 blocks apart and always next to a Chipotle. What you might be forgetting it that a city is not a for profit organization but a living place for those with the desire to make it their home. There must be a place for culture to grow along with industry however rents are far above what artist, musicians, writers, performers can afford. 

    The combination of corporate money and government complicity are changing who can live downtown now. I don't hate large corporations per se I believe they are having too big an impact of on how cities have worked and it's citizens have lived. 

    I know the Home Depot on 23rd street and I did live in Chelsea for some time and most of the small hardware stores have shut with the exception of Kove on 7th Ave. I suspect that business owns that building or they would be gone too. As a small business owner and long time resident of NY I have never seen such a rapid change in the city in regards to empty storefronts, the invasion of chain stores and the obliteration of family run businesses. 


    edited March 7
  • Reply 13 of 20
    bshankbshank Posts: 140member
    Massachusetts would be awesome. I could understand if they choose Pennsylvania 
    JWSC
  • Reply 14 of 20
    steveausteveau Posts: 190member
    Funny use of language in the headline and teaser.  I don't think an Apple campus is going to "spring up" or "pop up" anywhere.  I expect it will be a much more deliberative and active process.  But perhaps I'm wrong and 3 months from now a campus will appear out of nowhere.  I suppose that would be exciting.
    This is my game, it takes around five years to do anything, much less less if you buy an existing building and rent, but much longer if site amalgamation, zoning changes and exotic new architecture are required. Apple Park took 12 years (they bought the land in 2006 and it's just about fully operational now).
  • Reply 15 of 20
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,353member
    They need a Siri development and support center with at least 6,000 people along with big regional centers in Europe and Asia.
  • Reply 16 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,064member
    spice-boy said:
    Are you aware of NY's Mayor's plans to re-zone area's of the East and Greenwich Village neighborhoods to accommodate his vision of a "Silicon Alley" extension from Union Sq to Astor Place? This is an important historic area along Broadway and 4th Ave. Office buildings are planned for 3rd Avenue which will be occupied by tech companies which will forever change this area and force more small businesses and working class residents out of homes many have lived in their entire lives. The people coming to work for Google and Facebook do not support small businesses, they in most part are not native New Yorkers and like sterile corporate looking place to eat and buy their toothpaste. The city is looking more like a mid-wester shopping mall everyday, bland storefronts of glass with slick logos, and endless repeat of Starbucks spaced 4 blocks apart and always next to a Chipotle. What you might be forgetting it that a city is not a for profit organization but a living place for those with the desire to make it their home. There must be a place for culture to grow along with industry however rents are far above what artist, musicians, writers, performers can afford. 

    The combination of corporate money and government complicity are changing who can live downtown now. I don't hate large corporations per se I believe they are having too big an impact of on how cities have worked and it's citizens have lived. 

    I know the Home Depot on 23rd street and I did live in Chelsea for some time and most of the small hardware stores have shut with the exception of Kove on 7th Ave. I suspect that business owns that building or they would be gone too. As a small business owner and long time resident of NY I have never seen such a rapid change in the city in regards to empty storefronts, the invasion of chain stores and the obliteration of family run businesses. 


    That area has been changing for decades. My business was on 21st and Broadway, so I know the area well. My previous was on 19 West 17th st, so I know that well, and I went to the old /Stuyvesant HS, further down, in the mid 1960’s. So most of my life has been in that area, in one way or the other.

    when I was in HS, Union Square park was a hangout for drug addicts and dealers, and worse. Most of the buildings were either empty, or housed small trade schools, or cheap clothing distributors. Klein’s department store was there. Now, most of the areas is home for small higher end businesses, and plenty of condo’s and co-ops. The area is filled with younger people, and entertainment. Apple has two stores in the general area.

    and again, I do t agree with you. You are apparently looking at different things than I am. But when I was a kid, NYC had 7 million people, now we have over 8.5 million. Small companies can’t provide all the Jobs needed.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,293member
    IMO if Apple is looking more for a call-center operation rather than a tech incubator I believe they'll end up in Florida.

    Otherwise New York is trying to become the East Coast equivalent of the valley, and with some success from the likes of Amazon, Spotify, Microsoft and dozens of other smaller players. Google for instance was recently reported as investing $B there to further develop their existing East Coast tech center. If it's meant as anything more than an Apple support center New York does make a lot of sense. 
    edited March 8
  • Reply 18 of 20
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,336administrator
    steveau said:
    Funny use of language in the headline and teaser.  I don't think an Apple campus is going to "spring up" or "pop up" anywhere.  I expect it will be a much more deliberative and active process.  But perhaps I'm wrong and 3 months from now a campus will appear out of nowhere.  I suppose that would be exciting.
    This is my game, it takes around five years to do anything, much less less if you buy an existing building and rent, but much longer if site amalgamation, zoning changes and exotic new architecture are required. Apple Park took 12 years (they bought the land in 2006 and it's just about fully operational now).
    This headline is too long:

    "Apple's new US campus most likely to endure endless debates by governmental agencies, interminable slogs with architects, delays with contractors, and a horde of other problems in northeast, report argues"


    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 19 of 20
    steveausteveau Posts: 190member
    steveau said:
    Funny use of language in the headline and teaser.  I don't think an Apple campus is going to "spring up" or "pop up" anywhere.  I expect it will be a much more deliberative and active process.  But perhaps I'm wrong and 3 months from now a campus will appear out of nowhere.  I suppose that would be exciting.
    This is my game, it takes around five years to do anything, much less less if you buy an existing building and rent, but much longer if site amalgamation, zoning changes and exotic new architecture are required. Apple Park took 12 years (they bought the land in 2006 and it's just about fully operational now).
    This headline is too long:

    "Apple's new US campus most likely to endure endless debates by governmental agencies, interminable slogs with architects, delays with contractors, and a horde of other problems in northeast, report argues"


    Yes, that's how it looks from the outside, but it's like anything: there's legislation, stakeholders and process and its mostly necessary in order to protect the various interests (including the public) and produce, hopefully, the best outcome. Each and every Apple Store probably takes two to three years, so a new campus will take a bit longer. Not to say that this process couldn't be massively improved - which is one of the things I'm working on, but a breakthrough will be a little while yet. BTW how long does it take to design, tool up for, test and start production on a new chip?
  • Reply 20 of 20
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,064member
    spice-boy said:
    Are you aware of NY's Mayor's plans to re-zone area's of the East and Greenwich Village neighborhoods to accommodate his vision of a "Silicon Alley" extension from Union Sq to Astor Place? This is an important historic area along Broadway and 4th Ave. Office buildings are planned for 3rd Avenue which will be occupied by tech companies which will forever change this area and force more small businesses and working class residents out of homes many have lived in their entire lives. The people coming to work for Google and Facebook do not support small businesses, they in most part are not native New Yorkers and like sterile corporate looking place to eat and buy their toothpaste. The city is looking more like a mid-wester shopping mall everyday, bland storefronts of glass with slick logos, and endless repeat of Starbucks spaced 4 blocks apart and always next to a Chipotle. What you might be forgetting it that a city is not a for profit organization but a living place for those with the desire to make it their home. There must be a place for culture to grow along with industry however rents are far above what artist, musicians, writers, performers can afford. 

    The combination of corporate money and government complicity are changing who can live downtown now. I don't hate large corporations per se I believe they are having too big an impact of on how cities have worked and it's citizens have lived. 

    I know the Home Depot on 23rd street and I did live in Chelsea for some time and most of the small hardware stores have shut with the exception of Kove on 7th Ave. I suspect that business owns that building or they would be gone too. As a small business owner and long time resident of NY I have never seen such a rapid change in the city in regards to empty storefronts, the invasion of chain stores and the obliteration of family run businesses. 


    That area has been changing for decades. My business was on 21st and Broadway, so I know the area well. My previous was on 19 West 17th st, so I know that well, and I went to the old /Stuyvesant HS, further down, in the mid 1960’s. So most of my life has been in that area, in one way or the other.
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