Apple's Tim Cook to be deposed June 27 as part of Qualcomm countersuit

Posted:
in iPhone edited April 2018
Apple CEO Tim Cook will be deposed on June 27 as a part of a Qualcomm countersuit against the tech giant, accusing Apple of lying to regulators in order to spark government investigations.




A deposition was originally supposed to happen before May 11, but the two companies couldn't find a convenient date, according to a court filing seen by AppleInsider. The motion was signed by parties involved in the suit, including Apple suppliers Compal, Hon Hai/Foxconn, Pegatron, and Wistron.

It's rare for Cook himself to become involved in the company's legal battles, which are normally fought by the general counsel and hired attorneys.

The legal battle between Apple and Qualcomm kicked off in earnest in January of last year, with Apple launching a lawsuit charging that Qualcomm withheld $1 billion in payments as retaliation for cooperating with antitrust investigations. The situation gradually escalated into a number of suits and countersuits worldwide, as well as actions by national governments.

Apple and governments alike have accused Qualcomm of forcing companies buying its chips to also sign patent license agreements, and allegedly charging excessive amounts on standards-essential patents. For years, up until the release of the iPhone 7, Qualcomm was Apple's exclusive supplier for cellular modems -- it had expected rebates in return, which it says were unfairly denied.

Another core Apple argument is that it's unfair to charge royalties based on the price of a complete device versus what Qualcomm's parts contribute to the whole. In the case of the $999-plus iPhone X, that can amount to substantial sums.

Starting with iPhone 7, Apple began diversifying its modem supply, adding Intel to the mix. That proved controversial after tests showed Intel's initial modems were slower than their Qualcomm counterparts, and that Apple was deliberately limiting the latter to equalize performance between the models. The situation is set to change, however, as Intel's technology catches up with the competition.

Cook Deposition Motion by Mikey Campbell on Scribd

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    What is he looking at...?
  • Reply 2 of 18
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    dysamoria said:
    What is he looking at...?
    A floating iPad.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    Qualcomm is playing dirty.
  • Reply 4 of 18
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    dysamoria said:
    What is he looking at...?
    A floating iPad.
    It’s not floating; it’s balanced on top of his bonus. 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 5 of 18
    dysamoria said:
    What is he looking at...?

    The Future!
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 18
    dysamoria said:
    What is he looking at...?
    Apple's cash pile.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 7 of 18
    dysamoria said:
    What is he looking at...?
    Steve...
  • Reply 8 of 18
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,707member
    A bloody huge huntsman spider on the corniche!
    Rayz2016
  • Reply 9 of 18
    hentaiboyhentaiboy Posts: 1,249member
    Interesting use of the word “depose”. 

    Normally: 1. remove from office suddenly and forcefully.
    beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 10 of 18
    hentaiboy said:
    Interesting use of the word “depose”. 

    Normally: 1. remove from office suddenly and forcefully.

    Indeed.  As an avid reader of historical fiction and non-fiction, along with medieval style fantasy, that was the first meaning that popped into my head. :)
  • Reply 11 of 18
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,469member
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
    The editor's usage of "deposed" was absolutely proper. It's very commonly used in a legal setting and somewhat surprised so many seem to be unaware of it. In this event Mr. Cook becomes a deponent, having been deposed in accordance with a deposition. 
    :)

    https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/who-is-deposed-first--plaintiff--defendant--or-who-3070834.html
  • Reply 13 of 18
    gatorguy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
    The editor's usage of "deposed" was absolutely proper. It's very commonly used in a legal setting and somewhat surprised so many seem to be unaware of it. In this event Mr. Cook becomes a deponent, having been deposed in accordance with a deposition. 
    :)

    https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/who-is-deposed-first--plaintiff--defendant--or-who-3070834.html
    I'm aware of the dual meaning, it just wasn't the first one that popped into my head. :)
  • Reply 14 of 18
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,469member
    gatorguy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
    The editor's usage of "deposed" was absolutely proper. It's very commonly used in a legal setting and somewhat surprised so many seem to be unaware of it. In this event Mr. Cook becomes a deponent, having been deposed in accordance with a deposition. 
    :)

    https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/who-is-deposed-first--plaintiff--defendant--or-who-3070834.html
    I'm aware of the dual meaning, it just wasn't the first one that popped into my head. :)
    I figured you were. You seem fairly savvy in legal issues.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    mnbob1mnbob1 Posts: 269member
    hentaiboy said:
    Interesting use of the word “depose”. 

    Normally: 1. remove from office suddenly and forcefully.
    There's a chance you are being snarky against who I'm not quite sure. But in any case:

    Since you must have looked up the word depose you might have added the additional definitions that are listed on http://dictionary.com
    verb (used with object), deposed, deposing.
    1.
    to remove from office or position, especially high office:
    The people deposed the dictator.
    2.
    to testify or affirm under oath, especially in a written statement:
    to depose that it was true.
    3.
    Law. to take the deposition of; examine under oath:
    Two lawyers deposed the witness.
    verb (used without object), deposed, deposing.
    4.
    to give sworn testimony, especially in writing.

  • Reply 16 of 18
    mnbob1mnbob1 Posts: 269member
    gatorguy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
    The editor's usage of "deposed" was absolutely proper. It's very commonly used in a legal setting and somewhat surprised so many seem to be unaware of it. In this event Mr. Cook becomes a deponent, having been deposed in accordance with a deposition. 
    :)

    https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/who-is-deposed-first--plaintiff--defendant--or-who-3070834.html
    I'm aware of the dual meaning, it just wasn't the first one that popped into my head. :)
    Thanks for sharing for whatever reason. Political or whatever.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    mnbob1mnbob1 Posts: 269member
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" defini

    depose

    [dih-pohz]
    verb (used with object), deposed, deposing.
    1.
    to remove from office or position, especially high office:
    The people deposed the dictator.
    2.
    to testify or affirm under oath, especially in a written statement:
    to depose that it was true.
    3.
    Law. to take the deposition of; examine under oath:
    Two lawyers deposed the witness.
    verb (used without object), deposed, deposing.
    4.
    to give sworn testimony, especially in writing.

  • Reply 18 of 18
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,707member
    gatorguy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Same here. Normally the word "deposition" is used somehow in legal proceedings, and "deposed" tends to be used more often as the "removed from power" definition.
    The editor's usage of "deposed" was absolutely proper. It's very commonly used in a legal setting and somewhat surprised so many seem to be unaware of it. In this event Mr. Cook becomes a deponent, having been deposed in accordance with a deposition. 
    :)

    https://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/who-is-deposed-first--plaintiff--defendant--or-who-3070834.html
    True. However, I did take the alternative meaning at first and did a double take about what was meant until I looked at the article. In any case it then also brought to mind that little bit of Shakespearean wisdom: “The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers”.
    ZRyser
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