iOS 11.3 upgrade fatal for some repaired iPhone 8 screens done by third-party shops

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 49
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    mazda 3s said:
    I suppose people forget a time (not so long ago) when you'd have to mail your product back to the manufacturer and it could take 6-8 weeks for them to do something about it!
    And my 5-year-old didn't know what a house phone was, or a cassette tape -- times change ;)

    My wife and I nearly had a heart attack a few weeks back from laughter. We were at my wife's grandfather's house (he just turned 93) and his house phone rang. My son genuinely looked shocked and dumbfounded. He said, "What IS that? What's that noise?". Great-grand -- as he calls him -- pointed to the phone and showed it to him; you would have thought that he was looking at an alien :)
    Haha!  :D
  • Reply 22 of 49
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
     Here we go here we go again.  I can't imagine why any self-respecting iPhone owner would take it to some disreputable place to have something as important as the screen worked upon.

    Would you bring your Ferrari to Joe's Garage and have it repaired with third-party parts?
    glee217watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 49
    mazda 3smazda 3s Posts: 1,612member
    nunzy said:
     Here we go here we go again.  I can't imagine why any self-respecting iPhone owner would take it to some disreputable place to have something as important as the screen worked upon.

    Would you bring your Ferrari to Joe's Garage and have it repaired with third-party parts?
    I wouldn't compare an iPhone to a Ferrari. It would be more like taking your BMW to an independent shop in town that works on European brands like Mercedes, Audi, BMW, and Volvo instead of your certified BMW dealership. To that end, I was in Pep Boys today getting an oil change/tire rotation when a guy in a first generation BMW Z3 came in saying that his car battery wasn't holding a charge. They took it in the shop and confirmed that the battery was dead. They ended up charging him $209 for a Bosch battery (including installation). He told them that the BMW dealership wanted $325 plus $75 to install it.

    So what's my point? I wouldn't consider replacing a display on an iPhone to be rocket science (just like it's not rocket science to change a car battery). I've done it numerous times on an iPhone 5 and an iPhone 6 (my wife is a klutz). Independent repair shops can do it without an issue. In fact, these iPhone 8s that were fixed were working perfectly fine -- as they should -- until the Apple update was pushed out. I don't see that as a knock again a third-party for installing the display -- their work was sound. It was just that Apple decided to flip the switch and decertify the work.
    muthuk_vanalingamairnerdgatorguy
  • Reply 24 of 49
    rnaderpornaderpo Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    We repair a lot of iPhone and iPads and we have been doing it for the last 9 years. There are two reasons for this issue. One is the recent garbage quality control from Apple when it comes to iOS updates. iOS 11 has been one of the worst major update from Apple so far. The whole problem started when they released iOS 9. It has gotten worse and worse over time. The second issue is with Apple trying to push 3rd party repair shops out of business so they create updates that are incompatible on purpose or they don't check to make sure they are compatible. This has been very obvious since the release of iOS 11. This is the second time since iOS 11 release that phones are becoming unresponsive. After a lot of complaints from iOS 11, Apple released multiple patches to fix their horrible iOS 11 so the problem went away. Now AGAIN iOS 11.3 is causing problems. We have had these kind of issues in earlier iOS updates. But now, not only iOS 11 is causing problems with thired party screens, it is actually causing ton of problem with phones that were never fixed before. Issues like battery drainage, slowing older phones badly, home button issues, iPhone 10 freezing completely after being dropped to name a few.
  • Reply 25 of 49
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,707member
    MplsP said:
    Assuming this is due to an incompatibility with a chip used in 3rd party repairs, I wouldn't necessarily expect Apple to be aware of it before releasing an iOS or firmware update. I would expect them to look into the issue if it is widespread, though.

    It would be nice if Apple made it easier to 'downgrade' to a previous version after updating iOS. There have been several times over the years where iOS upgrades either made my older device unbearably slow, or there were unknown bugs or other issues that actually made the new version less functional than the old one. While technically feasible to restore an older version, it's never easy or straightforward.
    You can, but it's tricky and you have a short window to do it. Apple stops signing the older iOS images within a few weeks after they release an update.  Here is a good guide to give you a reference on how to do it. 

    https://m.wikihow.com/Downgrade-iOS

    That's the problem - you wait a week to upgrade your phone, it takes a couple days to figure out what's going and discover the bug and by then Apple has stopped signing the older images. :/
    mazda 3s said:
    nunzy said:
     Here we go here we go again.  I can't imagine why any self-respecting iPhone owner would take it to some disreputable place to have something as important as the screen worked upon.

    Would you bring your Ferrari to Joe's Garage and have it repaired with third-party parts?
    I wouldn't compare an iPhone to a Ferrari. It would be more like taking your BMW to an independent shop in town that works on European brands like Mercedes, Audi, BMW, and Volvo instead of your certified BMW dealership. To that end, I was in Pep Boys today getting an oil change/tire rotation when a guy in a first generation BMW Z3 came in saying that his car battery wasn't holding a charge. They took it in the shop and confirmed that the battery was dead. They ended up charging him $209 for a Bosch battery (including installation). He told them that the BMW dealership wanted $325 plus $75 to install it.

    So what's my point? I wouldn't consider replacing a display on an iPhone to be rocket science (just like it's not rocket science to change a car battery). I've done it numerous times on an iPhone 5 and an iPhone 6 (my wife is a klutz). Independent repair shops can do it without an issue. In fact, these iPhone 8s that were fixed were working perfectly fine -- as they should -- until the Apple update was pushed out. I don't see that as a knock again a third-party for installing the display -- their work was sound. It was just that Apple decided to flip the switch and decertify the work.
    This. 

    Many people buy iPhones from other retailers besides Apple and Apple Stores are not convenient for everyone who has purchased an iPhone. Furthermore, given the number of Apple devices in circulation, if everyone who needed repairs were to bring them to an Apple Store, the wait would be several weeks long. There are many independent repair shops that can do a fine job of repairing devices, frequently faster cheaper and more conveniently than going to an Apple Authorized repair shop. I'm not sure where people get off criticizing others for going this route. 

    It's not clear that Apple intentionally crippled these components. I think it's more likely they were an unintended casualty, but to fault consumers for it is absurd.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 26 of 49
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,184member
    MplsP said:

    It's not clear that Apple intentionally crippled these components. I think it's more likely they were an unintended casualty, but to fault consumers for it is absurd.
    No fault to the customers. The fault lies with the third party repair shops. As for the claim of Apple intentionally crippling these repairs that’s even absurd. The repair shops know what caused the problem, the chips. In the most likely scenario Apple decided to use a feature/function of the newer chips that was not available or implemented on the older chips. End of story but I’m sure accusations of skullduggery will be thrown around.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 27 of 49
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,259member
    mazda 3s said:
    Not everybody lives near an Apple store. Heck there aren’t even Apple Stores in all 50 states.
    jcs2305 said:
    Are these folks unable to mail a device to Apple for repair?  

    Like rogifan said, not everyone lives within earshot of an Apple Store. The closest one to me is 35 mins away. The next closest one is 50 mins away. Some others don't have that luxury. Now, there's a third-party repair shop about 5 mins dow the road, but I've never had to use them (fortunately).

    My only problem with this whole thing is that the phones were working perfectly fine beforehand, and then an update kills them out of the blue.
    But it’s not out of the blue, there’s a technical reason even if don’t know it. One likely due to the use of similar but different chips. 
    cornchip
  • Reply 28 of 49
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,259member
    rnaderpo said:
    We repair a lot of iPhone and iPads and we have been doing it for the last 9 years. There are two reasons for this issue. One is the recent garbage quality control from Apple when it comes to iOS updates. iOS 11 has been one of the worst major update from Apple so far. The whole problem started when they released iOS 9. It has gotten worse and worse over time. The second issue is with Apple trying to push 3rd party repair shops out of business so they create updates that are incompatible on purpose 
    That’s sounds like paranoia on your part. Got any evidence that’s why? Otherwise...meh. 
  • Reply 29 of 49
    foggyhill said:
    kruegdude said:
    My iPad Air 2 is bricked after installing 11.3. Touch screen does not work anymore. Same for my iPhone 6s Plus. Smh. 
    Problems with two devices in the same household? Something serious wrong with that. 
    Or serious amount of throlling, I'm going for throlling.
    Somehow it also bricked his Samsung Galaxy S9+ and his dog started meowing, all because of the iOS 11.3 update. Apple has some serious explaining to do.
  • Reply 30 of 49
    Meanwhile, Apple's $29 price tag for an iPhone 8 repair, for those with AppleCare+, does not apply to the back glass, which costs $99.

    Apple never claimed that it did. 

    According to Apple's page explaining Applecare + it says:

    AppleCare+ for iPhone extends your coverage to two years from the original purchase date of your iPhone and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $29 for screen damage, or $99 for any other damage, plus applicable tax. In addition, you’ll get 24/7 priority access to Apple experts via chat or phone.

    So what was the point of that paragraph?  The back glass should be covered under screen damage?

    The reason why it costs $99 is that the back glass is part of the enclosure which Apple does not repair, they replace the whole unit. Why? Because they would have to gut the phone to do it and they won't do that in their retail stores. 
    Where are you getting that we're implying anything? We're aware that it's part of the case.

    If we wanted to say that we think it should be a $29 repair, we'd say that specific thing.
    I was asking what was the point of saying the $29 repair which is for screen replacements does not apply to the back?

    If you were aware that it's part of the case then you know already that a $29 repair is only for the screen as do most people who buy Applecare +. 






  • Reply 31 of 49
    Meanwhile, Apple's $29 price tag for an iPhone 8 repair, for those with AppleCare+, does not apply to the back glass, which costs $99.

    Apple never claimed that it did. 

    According to Apple's page explaining Applecare + it says:

    AppleCare+ for iPhone extends your coverage to two years from the original purchase date of your iPhone and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $29 for screen damage, or $99 for any other damage, plus applicable tax. In addition, you’ll get 24/7 priority access to Apple experts via chat or phone.

    So what was the point of that paragraph?  The back glass should be covered under screen damage?

    The reason why it costs $99 is that the back glass is part of the enclosure which Apple does not repair, they replace the whole unit. Why? Because they would have to gut the phone to do it and they won't do that in their retail stores. 
    If a person doesn’t treat these devices as very costly consumer electronics and protect them with appropriate covers and cases, they’re just being foolish.
    Thank you. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 32 of 49
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,076member
    Meanwhile, Apple's $29 price tag for an iPhone 8 repair, for those with AppleCare+, does not apply to the back glass, which costs $99.

    Apple never claimed that it did. 

    According to Apple's page explaining Applecare + it says:

    AppleCare+ for iPhone extends your coverage to two years from the original purchase date of your iPhone and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $29 for screen damage, or $99 for any other damage, plus applicable tax. In addition, you’ll get 24/7 priority access to Apple experts via chat or phone.

    So what was the point of that paragraph?  The back glass should be covered under screen damage?

    The reason why it costs $99 is that the back glass is part of the enclosure which Apple does not repair, they replace the whole unit. Why? Because they would have to gut the phone to do it and they won't do that in their retail stores. 
    If a person doesn’t treat these devices as very costly consumer electronics and protect them with appropriate covers and cases, they’re just being foolish.
    Agreed 100%. The only phones I see with smashed screens, Apple or otherwise, are not in a case. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 33 of 49
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,076member
    rnaderpo said:
    We repair a lot of iPhone and iPads and we have been doing it for the last 9 years. There are two reasons for this issue. One is the recent garbage quality control from Apple when it comes to iOS updates. iOS 11 has been one of the worst major update from Apple so far. The whole problem started when they released iOS 9. It has gotten worse and worse over time. The second issue is with Apple trying to push 3rd party repair shops out of business so they create updates that are incompatible on purpose or they don't check to make sure they are compatible. This has been very obvious since the release of iOS 11. This is the second time since iOS 11 release that phones are becoming unresponsive. After a lot of complaints from iOS 11, Apple released multiple patches to fix their horrible iOS 11 so the problem went away. Now AGAIN iOS 11.3 is causing problems. We have had these kind of issues in earlier iOS updates. But now, not only iOS 11 is causing problems with thired party screens, it is actually causing ton of problem with phones that were never fixed before. Issues like battery drainage, slowing older phones badly, home button issues, iPhone 10 freezing completely after being dropped to name a few.
    With all due respect, why should Apple test to see if an update works with non-Apple OEM parts? It’s still buyer beware, after all. 
    bonobobSpamSandwich
  • Reply 34 of 49
    I replace the iPhone screen. Never replaced the iPad screen.
  • Reply 35 of 49
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    Assuming this is due to an incompatibility with a chip used in 3rd party repairs, I wouldn't necessarily expect Apple to be aware of it before releasing an iOS or firmware update. I would expect them to look into the issue if it is widespread, though.

    It would be nice if Apple made it easier to 'downgrade' to a previous version after updating iOS. There have been several times over the years where iOS upgrades either made my older device unbearably slow, or there were unknown bugs or other issues that actually made the new version less functional than the old one. While technically feasible to restore an older version, it's never easy or straightforward.
    You can, but it's tricky and you have a short window to do it. Apple stops signing the older iOS images within a few weeks after they release an update.  Here is a good guide to give you a reference on how to do it. 

    https://m.wikihow.com/Downgrade-iOS

    That's the problem - you wait a week to upgrade your phone, it takes a couple days to figure out what's going and discover the bug and by then Apple has stopped signing the older images. :/
    mazda 3s said:
    nunzy said:
     Here we go here we go again.  I can't imagine why any self-respecting iPhone owner would take it to some disreputable place to have something as important as the screen worked upon.

    Would you bring your Ferrari to Joe's Garage and have it repaired with third-party parts?
    I wouldn't compare an iPhone to a Ferrari. It would be more like taking your BMW to an independent shop in town that works on European brands like Mercedes, Audi, BMW, and Volvo instead of your certified BMW dealership. To that end, I was in Pep Boys today getting an oil change/tire rotation when a guy in a first generation BMW Z3 came in saying that his car battery wasn't holding a charge. They took it in the shop and confirmed that the battery was dead. They ended up charging him $209 for a Bosch battery (including installation). He told them that the BMW dealership wanted $325 plus $75 to install it.

    So what's my point? I wouldn't consider replacing a display on an iPhone to be rocket science (just like it's not rocket science to change a car battery). I've done it numerous times on an iPhone 5 and an iPhone 6 (my wife is a klutz). Independent repair shops can do it without an issue. In fact, these iPhone 8s that were fixed were working perfectly fine -- as they should -- until the Apple update was pushed out. I don't see that as a knock again a third-party for installing the display -- their work was sound. It was just that Apple decided to flip the switch and decertify the work.
    This. 

    Many people buy iPhones from other retailers besides Apple and Apple Stores are not convenient for everyone who has purchased an iPhone. Furthermore, given the number of Apple devices in circulation, if everyone who needed repairs were to bring them to an Apple Store, the wait would be several weeks long. There are many independent repair shops that can do a fine job of repairing devices, frequently faster cheaper and more conveniently than going to an Apple Authorized repair shop. I'm not sure where people get off criticizing others for going this route. 

    It's not clear that Apple intentionally crippled these components. I think it's more likely they were an unintended casualty, but to fault consumers for it is absurd.
    I hear you about waiting too long to update then wish you hadn't. I learned my lesson. Unless there is a compelling reason to update, I'll wait. 

    I also agree that I don't think that Apple intentionally crippled chips, unless they were running Apple firmware inside those chips illegally.  If a DFU update fixes those issues, then it's not hardware. My friends at the local Apple Store haven't mentioned anything about 3rd party screens getting bricked. 

    BTW, some Apple stores will replace your 3rd party iPhone display for the cost of a display as long as it didn't cause any other damage to your device. One of the problems they have seen is poor quality repairs that damage the logic board making a screen replacement impossible. 
  • Reply 36 of 49
    rnaderpo said:  iPhone 10 freezing completely after being dropped to name a few.
    That can happen with any phone. Not just iPhones. If you run a repair shop you know this. 

    If you wanted to make more of an impact to prove that third party repair shops are just as good as going to an Apple Store, then you need to police yourselves in how you perform your repairs. Some places don't care about electrostatic discharge while working on open devices and cause issues that will appear later. Some places use crappy parts that don't fit correctly, don't color match and feel cheap. 
    For the price that people pay for these repairs, you could have Apple do it and have them stand behind their work. 

    I do understand that some people don't live near an Apple Store and need to get their phone repaired. I totally agree with that. The problem I have is people get their phones fixed at the mall and end up with a broken device because the kid who fixed your phone knows nothing about ESD safety and how to be careful when working on someone's phone. It's not like they have a replacement if things go south.


    edited April 2018
  • Reply 37 of 49
    FranculesFrancules Posts: 122member
    A possible glimpse of poetic justice at it’s finest. 
  • Reply 38 of 49
    kruegdude said:
    An iOS upgrade is causing deaths? 
    Must be the suicides of the die-hard Android apologists.


    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 39 of 49
    wonkothesanewonkothesane Posts: 1,634member
    Welcome your “right to repair”. Consequently, Apple should be taken to court for not taking sufficiently all “updates” imaginable that cheap third party repairers put into the phones and iPads....  
    scnr. 
    airnerd
  • Reply 40 of 49
    MplsP said:
    It's not clear that Apple intentionally crippled these components. I think it's more likely they were an unintended casualty, but to fault consumers for it is absurd.

    What you said.

    Especially when the phone works fine after the repair, and only breaks when updating the OS.

    airnerd
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