Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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  • Reply 41 of 289
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,730administrator
    mygig said:
    mygig said:
    They wanted a screen replacement and in my opinion, they should be able to get that done by Apple, no matter how much they charge. I know they don't have do to it, because it's in their terms of service, but it shouldn't be, it's not the right thing to do. This Apple defense you wrote up, is pointless in my opinion. Always had Appleinsider in high regards, but how you tried to discredit them was not OK, lost quite a bit of points by me.
    Why is explaining how the service model works and the facts that make this repair not worth it to “not OK”?
    - "The video starts by showing one employee of the YouTube channel appearing to mount the display while the iMac Pro is vertical" (It was clearly reenacted, so they maybe did work on it like that, maybe they didn't)
    - "Yeah, the YouTubers had an "accident" as they said. But, it appears that they were more interested in generating revenue and having a laugh, rather than portraying any part of the repair process accurately." (They presented what happened to them)
    - "The Apple store likely punted based on Linus Tech Tips bringing in what was essentially a box of parts, plus the clear damage caused by the disassembly and failure of reassembly." (you don't know in what condition the iMac was brought in) 
    - "This is in no way a cost-effective repair -- which the video creators were likely fully aware of before they made their video about the process." (been watching their videos for quite some time, they never pulled anything like this before, not saying they didn't do it this time, just that they didn't do it before)
    - "while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience." (do I need to add anything here?)

    That's what I meant..
    1) Read the sentence again. That is exactly what the video showed. We made no comment on if it was a re-enaction.
    2) Watch the video again. Sure wasn't serious!
    3) I know what condition the iMac Pro was brought in, as they said themselves how they brought it in -- disassembled with a smashed screen.
    4) They said that they're technicians. If they didn't know, then they aren't good technicians, so which is more likely? I didn't say that they had done it before.
    5) Their analogy was crashing into a lamp post. It's a garbage analogy, because it didn't magically break by accident while they were in the course of normal use. They took it apart, willingly, to make a video about it and make money on YouTube and failed to re-assemble it without damage.

    This isn't a news article. It is an editorial, with opinions.
    edited April 18 liquidmarkStrangeDaysradarthekatfastasleepbaconstangwilliamlondonaxcoatl
  • Reply 42 of 289
    Andrew_OSUAndrew_OSU Posts: 193member, editor
    mygig said:
    They wanted a screen replacement and in my opinion, they should be able to get that done by Apple, no matter how much they charge. I know they don't have do to it, because it's in their terms of service, but it shouldn't be, it's not the right thing to do. This Apple defense you wrote up, is pointless in my opinion. Always had Appleinsider in high regards, but how you tried to discredit them was not OK, lost quite a bit of points by me.
    Like others have said, it is pretty cut and dry. Right after a product is released, especially a high-end pro machine, replacement parts are scarce. They take a little bit to get into supply channels. This is understandable.

    Linus, in the video, says he needs a motherboard, a screen replacement, and a new power supply. More more than just a screen. That actually leaves very little of the original machine left not needing replaced. That is basically a shell, plus the ram and SSD intact?

    Those replacement (core) parts, are now widely available. So if he took it into a shop now, chances are it would able to be repaired, though at quite a high cost. More than the machine cost to begin with.

    The repair shop also seemingly lied, as we were able to verify that the certification for repairing the pro has been available since December. The shop most likely didn't have the certification since it was so new and used that as an excuse to get out of performing the repair.

    So really, it is a simple matter of no parts in stock right after a product launch. Apple wasn't trying to screw anyone over.
    liquidmarktmayradarthekatbaconstang
  • Reply 43 of 289
    Ed_RandgadEd_Randgad Posts: 4unconfirmed, member

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Nope.

    This isn't about warranty repair. This is about a repair after customer abuse -- which LTT admits to.
    Then why are they even responding about not able to obtain parts?  Just be straight and say "Apple won't repair your iMac Pro."  
  • Reply 44 of 289
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 329member

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    That has been proposed, but as far as I know not  passed. 
  • Reply 45 of 289
    mygigmygig Posts: 24member
    mygig said:
    mygig said:
    They wanted a screen replacement and in my opinion, they should be able to get that done by Apple, no matter how much they charge. I know they don't have do to it, because it's in their terms of service, but it shouldn't be, it's not the right thing to do. This Apple defense you wrote up, is pointless in my opinion. Always had Appleinsider in high regards, but how you tried to discredit them was not OK, lost quite a bit of points by me.
    Read the whole article. At the least, it's a motherboard and screen replacement. At the most, it needed a new power supply too in addition to the motherboard and screen.
    I did, even watched their video again, thought I missed something. But they didn't say it was broken beyond repair, they didn't even try.

    Nope. The Apple store replaced the power supply. They then stopped, and told LTT to go to a third party.
    when do they say that? or in which email does it say that? the only thing I saw was, that they got a short, but could confirm, that the PSU is still outputting power, so their best case scenario is replacing the screen.
  • Reply 46 of 289
    andrusoidandrusoid Posts: 2unconfirmed, member

    Watch the beginning of the video carefully. That flash is the display arcing to ground. Hear the loud buzzing sound? That's not special efx. If you look at the lower right of the iMac, you can see that it is still plugged into AC power! So, yeah, a short to ground could blow the PSU, and motherboard. (Also not helpful was the vertical position, no esd mat or grounding...) 

    I'm a certified Mac technician and no AASP would sell the parts to me either.

    liquidmarkMike WuertheleGG1radarthekatfastasleeppscooter63baconstangmacseeker
  • Reply 47 of 289
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,730administrator

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Nope.

    This isn't about warranty repair. This is about a repair after customer abuse -- which LTT admits to.
    Then why are they even responding about not able to obtain parts?  Just be straight and say "Apple won't repair your iMac Pro."  
    Would have been good. Apple itself did say so. The third-party spun the song and dance about training not available for some reason.
  • Reply 48 of 289
    mygigmygig Posts: 24member
    mygig said:
    mygig said:
    They wanted a screen replacement and in my opinion, they should be able to get that done by Apple, no matter how much they charge. I know they don't have do to it, because it's in their terms of service, but it shouldn't be, it's not the right thing to do. This Apple defense you wrote up, is pointless in my opinion. Always had Appleinsider in high regards, but how you tried to discredit them was not OK, lost quite a bit of points by me.
    Why is explaining how the service model works and the facts that make this repair not worth it to “not OK”?
    - "The video starts by showing one employee of the YouTube channel appearing to mount the display while the iMac Pro is vertical" (It was clearly reenacted, so they maybe did work on it like that, maybe they didn't)
    - "Yeah, the YouTubers had an "accident" as they said. But, it appears that they were more interested in generating revenue and having a laugh, rather than portraying any part of the repair process accurately." (They presented what happened to them)
    - "The Apple store likely punted based on Linus Tech Tips bringing in what was essentially a box of parts, plus the clear damage caused by the disassembly and failure of reassembly." (you don't know in what condition the iMac was brought in) 
    - "This is in no way a cost-effective repair -- which the video creators were likely fully aware of before they made their video about the process." (been watching their videos for quite some time, they never pulled anything like this before, not saying they didn't do it this time, just that they didn't do it before)
    - "while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience." (do I need to add anything here?)

    That's what I meant..
    1) Read the sentence again. That is exactly what the video showed. We made no comment on if it was a re-enaction.
    2) Watch the video again. Sure wasn't serious!
    3) I know what condition the iMac Pro was brought in, as they said themselves how they brought it in -- disassembled with a smashed screen.
    4) They said that they're technicians. If they didn't know, then they aren't good technicians, so which is more likely? I didn't say that they had done it before.
    5) Their analogy was crashing into a lamp post. It's a garbage analogy, because it didn't magically break by accident while they were in the course of normal use. They took it apart, willingly, to make a video about it and make money on YouTube and failed to re-assemble it without damage.

    This isn't a news article. It is an editorial, with opinions.
    This doesn't undermine what I've said. I'm saying you were representing them like idiots, to get your opinion better across. Which you can obviously do, It's your editorial (and Malcolms). Well I'm standing by what I've said and you stand by what you've said. So no point on continuing this any further.
  • Reply 49 of 289
    netroxnetrox Posts: 681member
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    MDChops
  • Reply 50 of 289
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,730administrator
    mygig said:
    mygig said:
    mygig said:
    They wanted a screen replacement and in my opinion, they should be able to get that done by Apple, no matter how much they charge. I know they don't have do to it, because it's in their terms of service, but it shouldn't be, it's not the right thing to do. This Apple defense you wrote up, is pointless in my opinion. Always had Appleinsider in high regards, but how you tried to discredit them was not OK, lost quite a bit of points by me.
    Why is explaining how the service model works and the facts that make this repair not worth it to “not OK”?
    - "The video starts by showing one employee of the YouTube channel appearing to mount the display while the iMac Pro is vertical" (It was clearly reenacted, so they maybe did work on it like that, maybe they didn't)
    - "Yeah, the YouTubers had an "accident" as they said. But, it appears that they were more interested in generating revenue and having a laugh, rather than portraying any part of the repair process accurately." (They presented what happened to them)
    - "The Apple store likely punted based on Linus Tech Tips bringing in what was essentially a box of parts, plus the clear damage caused by the disassembly and failure of reassembly." (you don't know in what condition the iMac was brought in) 
    - "This is in no way a cost-effective repair -- which the video creators were likely fully aware of before they made their video about the process." (been watching their videos for quite some time, they never pulled anything like this before, not saying they didn't do it this time, just that they didn't do it before)
    - "while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience." (do I need to add anything here?)

    That's what I meant..
    1) Read the sentence again. That is exactly what the video showed. We made no comment on if it was a re-enaction.
    2) Watch the video again. Sure wasn't serious!
    3) I know what condition the iMac Pro was brought in, as they said themselves how they brought it in -- disassembled with a smashed screen.
    4) They said that they're technicians. If they didn't know, then they aren't good technicians, so which is more likely? I didn't say that they had done it before.
    5) Their analogy was crashing into a lamp post. It's a garbage analogy, because it didn't magically break by accident while they were in the course of normal use. They took it apart, willingly, to make a video about it and make money on YouTube and failed to re-assemble it without damage.

    This isn't a news article. It is an editorial, with opinions.
    This doesn't undermine what I've said. I'm saying you were representing them like idiots, to get your opinion better across. Which you can obviously do, It's your editorial (and Malcolms). Well I'm standing by what I've said and you stand by what you've said. So no point on continuing this any further.
    Agree... 

    One more thing, though. If I think somebody is an idiot, I'm not afraid to directly say that -- and I didn't in this case. I have a lot of issues with how they presented the content, though.
    edited April 18
  • Reply 51 of 289
    anomeanome Posts: 1,180member
    The video compares the incident to crashing a car into a street light, with the dealer and insurance company denying the repair because there aren't parts or repair manuals. The analogy is inappropriate, because an iMac Pro isn't a car, and this wasn't an incident generated by normal use.

    Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience.

    This is an odd analogy to use. After all, if you drive into a street light, first of all, the insurance company will determine whether you drove into it deliberately, and probably refuse to pay out. Otherwise, they will assess whether the repair cost is less than the agreed value of the car, and then either pay out for the repairs, or give you a cheque for the agreed value and take possession of the remains of the car - which they then dispose of in whatever way is appropriate, and generates the most money for them.

    The insurance makes the comparison awkward, since it doesn't really come into it in the Apple case. I mean, AppleCare is a kind of insurance, but I don't believe it works the same way as car insurance.

    I do wonder why they're so hung up on getting the machine repaired, rather than buying a new one and having Apple (or an enterprising third party) copy their data off the SSD of the old one. Given that repairing that one will involve replacing almost everything anyway, I just can't see why they won't cut their losses.

  • Reply 52 of 289
    majorslmajorsl Posts: 56unconfirmed, member
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    This. This is why so many professionals are running Hackintoshes.  They want expandability on their terms.  They want modular equipment.

    2K display obsolete? Buy a 5k and new video card (if necessary) for a fraction of the price of a new machine.  Expand RAM as needed. eGPU may fix some of that, but it's not a magic bullet.

    Apple hates this as the control freaks that they are.  They think everyone is going to blow up their equipment with a RAM upgrade, or that's the excuse.  The real reason is profit. Non-expandability and upgradability results in more unit sales when the widget they sold goes obsolete.  Mark my words: it is only a matter of time before the only software you can install on your Mac will be via the App Store.  A complete walled garden in the name of security, but really that's more profit too when you get a precent of sales!  I guess, in a way, you can't blame them for this.

    If they switch fully away from Intel and Hackintoshes are no longer possible, many of those Pro users will just go to another platform and to hell with Apple's software. Maybe Apple doesn't care.  They've long since tilted towards users who consume media and not create it because their obsession with the iOS is proof enough for this.

    edited April 18 bitmodmuthuk_vanalingamMDChops
  • Reply 53 of 289
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,730administrator
    anome said:
    The video compares the incident to crashing a car into a street light, with the dealer and insurance company denying the repair because there aren't parts or repair manuals. The analogy is inappropriate, because an iMac Pro isn't a car, and this wasn't an incident generated by normal use.

    Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience.

    This is an odd analogy to use. After all, if you drive into a street light, first of all, the insurance company will determine whether you drove into it deliberately, and probably refuse to pay out. Otherwise, they will assess whether the repair cost is less than the agreed value of the car, and then either pay out for the repairs, or give you a cheque for the agreed value and take possession of the remains of the car - which they then dispose of in whatever way is appropriate, and generates the most money for them.

    The insurance makes the comparison awkward, since it doesn't really come into it in the Apple case. I mean, AppleCare is a kind of insurance, but I don't believe it works the same way as car insurance.

    I do wonder why they're so hung up on getting the machine repaired, rather than buying a new one and having Apple (or an enterprising third party) copy their data off the SSD of the old one. Given that repairing that one will involve replacing almost everything anyway, I just can't see why they won't cut their losses.

    No real argument, mine is clumsy too. Compare cars to computers at your own peril, I guess.
    edited April 18
  • Reply 54 of 289
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,070member
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Ah look, he’s an armchair electrical engineer and armchair logistics expert too. Impressive. 
    I’ve repaired & upgraded many many hundreds of machines over a decade (including servers).
    So have I. But that doesn’t change the fact that the cost of repair was higher than replacement. Doing it makes no sense. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 55 of 289
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    Why do you think anyone has grounds to sue Apple here at all? The machine would operate properly if you don’t open it up.

    the ‘trash-can’ Mac Pro is modular and easy to repair. They give full access to the internals by design, What’s your problem?

    you know, professionals have different needs. There’s no catch-all need that all professionals care about. Personally, I just want something that works, has little down time and can handle heavy tasks without crashing. The iMac Pro can do all that. 

    I have professional clients that run their businesses on Macs because they work and are reliable. 

    The whole idea of an imac is that it’s supposed to be a reliable machine, so you don’t NEED to open it up constantly for maintenance. I have a 2010 27” iMac on a table right in front of me. You know how many times I needed to fix it in all that time? 0. 


    edited April 18 StrangeDaysradarthekatlamboaudi4
  • Reply 56 of 289
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,070member

    jwestveer said:
    You took your machine apart and broke it in the process?

    Awww, thats too bad.  Buy another one.  It is not the manufacture's problem.
    Real Pro users upgrade their machines.
    Absolutely false. DIY tinkerers and enthusiasts upgrade their machines. Enterprise money-makers replace them. You’re confusing yourself as a pro when you’re really a DIY enthusiast. Common mistake on these forums. 

    I’m an enterprise pro software dev, as an employee and contractor I’ve worked for many household name brands over decades. Never have any of these IT depts upgraded our machines. They have a useful lifespan and are replaced. That’s how business works. As a one-man shop or enthusiast you may do upgrades, but it’s atypical. 
    liquidmarkGG1kruegduderadarthekatmacxpressanomepscooter63baconstangsteven n.Tuubor
  • Reply 57 of 289
    anomeanome Posts: 1,180member
    anome said:
    The video compares the incident to crashing a car into a street light, with the dealer and insurance company denying the repair because there aren't parts or repair manuals. The analogy is inappropriate, because an iMac Pro isn't a car, and this wasn't an incident generated by normal use.

    Driving into a lamp post isn't the same as cracking open the engine block and breaking something, while explaining how internal combustion works to a rapt YouTube audience.

    This is an odd analogy to use. After all, if you drive into a street light, first of all, the insurance company will determine whether you drove into it deliberately, and probably refuse to pay out. Otherwise, they will assess whether the repair cost is less than the agreed value of the car, and then either pay out for the repairs, or give you a cheque for the agreed value and take possession of the remains of the car - which they then dispose of in whatever way is appropriate, and generates the most money for them.

    The insurance makes the comparison awkward, since it doesn't really come into it in the Apple case. I mean, AppleCare is a kind of insurance, but I don't believe it works the same way as car insurance.

    I do wonder why they're so hung up on getting the machine repaired, rather than buying a new one and having Apple (or an enterprising third party) copy their data off the SSD of the old one. Given that repairing that one will involve replacing almost everything anyway, I just can't see why they won't cut their losses.

    No real argument, mine is clumsy too. Compare cars to computers at your own peril, I guess.

    That's the problem with analogies. They're like instant coffee.

    My point was just that this particular analogy doesn't serve their argument at all. If they have a valid complaint, and I'm still not convinced they really do, they'd have been better off trying to express it some other way.

  • Reply 58 of 289
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,070member
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages.
    What on earth are you talking about? Sue Apple for what? It’s like if you got drunk and totaled your car and the shop said “It’s totaled man, find a new car.” You can’t sue the mechanic.

    I have tons of shit in my house I can’t repair, and I can’t sue the old TV repair guy if he says it’s not worth it to try (try) and fix a ruined flat panel. Same thing. 
    radarthekatanomepscooter63baconstang
  • Reply 59 of 289
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,744moderator
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    In which case a third party would begin building shells, buying the components from Apple and offering iMac Pro knockoffs.  
    baconstang
  • Reply 60 of 289
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,070member

    majorsl said:
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    This. This is why so many professionals are running Hackintoshes.  They want expandability on their terms.  They want modular equipment.

    2K display obsolete? Buy a 5k and new video card (if necessary) for a fraction of the price of a new machine.  Expand RAM as needed. eGPU may fix some of that, but it's not a magic bullet.

    Apple hates this as the control freaks that they are.  They think everyone is going to blow up their equipment with a RAM upgrade, or that's the excuse.  The real reason is profit. Non-expandability and upgradability results in more unit sales when the widget they sold goes obsolete.  Mark my words: it is only a matter of time before the only software you can install on your Mac will be via the App Store.  A complete walled garden in the name of security, but really that's more profit too when you get a precent of sales!  I guess, in a way, you can't blame them for this.

    If they switch fully away from Intel and Hackintoshes are no longer possible, many of those Pro users will just go to another platform and to hell with Apple's software. Maybe Apple doesn't care.  They've long since tilted towards users who consume media and not create it because their obsession with the iOS is proof enough for this.

    Delusional nonsense. Pros aren’t running Hackintoshes. Neck beard enthusiasts are. These two groups are not the same. 

    As a pro, we buy new machines when needed. I load it up, get good use out of the machine until it’s done, then replace. This isn’t my opinion, it’s fact as stated by Apple and AppleInsider. 

    Being a DIY tinkerer is fine (I am one too) but don’t confuse yourself for an enterprise user or typical pro. 
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