iOS 11 now installed on 76% of compatible devices, up 11% since January

Posted:
in iOS
New adoption statistics for iOS published on Apple's developer website reveal iOS 11 is installed on 76 percent of all compatible iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch models, a share that has increased by 11 percent since the start of this year.

iOS 11 adoption rate chart


The developer website's chart shows 19 percent of iOS 11-compatible devices are still running iOS 10 compared to the 76 percent running iOS 11 itself. Another 5 percent of devices are noted as running earlier versions of iOS, but this figure was not broken down further.

The iOS 11 adoption rate is up from the 65 percent recorded in January, which also counted 28 percent running iOS 10 and 7 percent on previous operating systems. The month before, iOS 11 was sitting at 59 percent, while iOS 10 and the "Earlier" group scored 33 percent and 8 percent respectively.

The latest result indicates a slight slowdown of installations compared to earlier results, with the adoption rising by an average of just under four percent per month since January. At the time of that result, it was noted the adoption rate was gaining about 6 to 7 percent per month.

The reduced installation rate is likely due to the ever-shrinking group of iOS 10 devices that can be updated, with the rate likely to reduce further in the coming months as iOS 11 installations saturate the pool.

Compared to iOS 10, it seems that the time it has taken for iOS 11 to reach three quarters of compatible hardware has increased. Data published in February last year revealed iOS 10 had reached 79 percent of all available devices.

The adoption rate is published by Apple itself, based on App Store tracking data it collects and can analyze. This makes the figures an accurate representation of the iOS marketplace compared to third-party estimates, which may rely on their own apps installed on a smaller subset of devices, rather than being able to monitor all active devices.

android adoption rate chart


Similar analysis of Android reveals only 4.6 percent of compatible devices are running Android "Oreo," with 4.1 percent using version 8.0, and just 0.5 percent on the latest version 8.1, while the majority of devices are spread across version 7.x Nougat, 6.0 Marshmallow, and 5.x Lollipop.

Unlike iOS, where Apple has control over when and how it distributes updates directly to consumers, device vendors are largely the fragmentation weak point for distributing Android, as the operating system is provided to smartphone producers who create their own customized versions before allowing customers to download the software. This can introduce delays of weeks or even months before end users are able to use the latest Android version, which can be an issue when software updates include security changes.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    ...I have to ask how many would revert if they had an easy option... I miss a number of apps that have not been upgraded, especially free ones that probably have little incentive to update their code...
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 2 of 25
    dws-2dws-2 Posts: 204member
    This is a true advantage Apple's iOS has over Android. I think they've damaged their advantage somewhat by the number of bugs in iOS 11, especially early on. I hope that iOS 12 is released with significantly less negative drama. Still, Apple should be commended for this upgrade rate. It's awesome, and part of what makes it so much more secure than Android.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 25
    mavemufcmavemufc Posts: 326member
    I want to know who the 5% are that are still using iOS 9 or earlier..
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 25
    mavemufc said:
    I want to know who the 5% are that are still using iOS 9 or earlier..
    Probably grandparents. 
    racerhomie3jony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 25
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,760member
    My wife only has the latest OS when she gets new phone. Doesn't let me update the OS if it "changes the way it looks".
    I do all the "." updates. So, her SE will stay on 10.whatever until she gets a new phone. Gotta pick your battles.
    edredwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 25
    edrededred Posts: 48member
    mavemufc said:
    I want to know who the 5% are that are still using iOS 9 or earlier..
    People with older iPhones, iPads and iPods not supported by iOS 10 and/or iOS11. And people that do not care about updating or do not want to for whatever reason.
    I personally have an iPad 3 with iOS 9 because it's the highest iOS version I can install on it.
    space2001
  • Reply 7 of 25
    dws-2 said:
    This is a true advantage Apple's iOS has over Android. I think they've damaged their advantage somewhat by the number of bugs in iOS 11, especially early on. I hope that iOS 12 is released with significantly less negative drama. Still, Apple should be commended for this upgrade rate. It's awesome, and part of what makes it so much more secure than Android.
    You realise that it's possible to be on an older version of Android but still have the most recent security patch right? Plus the apps are updated independently of the OS so any exploits in the apps are dealt with no matter which OS or patch you have. I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 8 of 25
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,040member
    mavemufc said:
    I want to know who the 5% are that are still using iOS 9 or earlier..
    It could be iPod's. I have an iPod Touch I haven't updated to iOS 11. I only use it for listening to music so I usually don't bother with updates. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 25
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    dws-2 said:
    This is a true advantage Apple's iOS has over Android. I think they've damaged their advantage somewhat by the number of bugs in iOS 11, especially early on. I hope that iOS 12 is released with significantly less negative drama. Still, Apple should be commended for this upgrade rate. It's awesome, and part of what makes it so much more secure than Android.
    You realise that it's possible to be on an older version of Android but still have the most recent security patch right? Plus the apps are updated independently of the OS so any exploits in the apps are dealt with no matter which OS or patch you have. I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    Right... Give me a break, inform yourself , there is a shitload of bugs in the underneat layer and most of those are never updated past the first release. If there is a bug, they are sunk.

    Notice the FBI never talks about cracking Android... Why? Because it is TRIVIAL and you don't need 15K and brute forcing passwords to do it either.
    edited April 25 racerhomie3jony0chasmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 25
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,396member
    ...I have to ask how many would revert if they had an easy option... I miss a number of apps that have not been upgraded, especially free ones that probably have little incentive to update their code…
    No idea, but iOS 11's Control Panel is enough to make me stay.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 25
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,396member
    dws-2 said:
    This is a true advantage Apple's iOS has over Android. I think they've damaged their advantage somewhat by the number of bugs in iOS 11, especially early on. I hope that iOS 12 is released with significantly less negative drama. Still, Apple should be commended for this upgrade rate. It's awesome, and part of what makes it so much more secure than Android.
    You realise that it's possible to be on an older version of Android but still have the most recent security patch right? Plus the apps are updated independently of the OS so any exploits in the apps are dealt with no matter which OS or patch you have. I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    So you're saying that regardless of the version of Android you're running you have all the same app APIs as the newest versions and all the same OS and kernel security enhancements of newest versions?
    edited April 25 racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 25
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,920member
    franklinjackcon said:

    I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    How many people would actually know if their phone had been hacked and was part of a botnet or had information taken from it?
    edited April 25 watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 25
    auxio said:
    franklinjackcon said:

    I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    How many people would actually know if their phone had been hacked and was part of a botnet or had information taken from it?
    All of them! Didn’t you see that post about the free Sophos app yesterday?! It uses absolutely no resources and gives full protection of any threats to an Android phone! And it’s free!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 25
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 184member
    mavemufc said:
    I want to know who the 5% are that are still using iOS 9 or earlier..
    Add me to your list on a second gen iPad. I use it for a wall clock. 
  • Reply 15 of 25
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 184member

    Soli said:
    ...I have to ask how many would revert if they had an easy option... I miss a number of apps that have not been upgraded, especially free ones that probably have little incentive to update their code…
    No idea, but iOS 11's Control Panel is enough to make me stay.
    I’m in agreement on that. That and the newest iPad multitasking gestures. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 25
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 184member
    ...I have to ask how many would revert if they had an easy option... I miss a number of apps that have not been upgraded, especially free ones that probably have little incentive to update their code...
    What are they? Do you have a list? I’m looking for something to create, iOS app wise, to learn coding in this environment. I figure my first few apps will be free. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 25
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,633member
    OK,good statistics to be proud of. But, because even you want to revert install older IOS, you can't so it will always be upward upgrade. Good thing Apple supports older iPhone/iPad models with newer IOS unlike Android where you have to pray and hope to receive upgrade. but down side newer IOS feels slightly slower in performance on older iPhones. In some cases, I would not mind to either stay on older IOS and even go back.
    edited April 25
  • Reply 18 of 25
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 184member
    wood1208 said:
    OK. Becuase even you want to install older IOS, you can't so it will always upward upgrade. Good thing Apple supports older iPhone/iPad models but bad thing newer IOS slightly slows down older models performance
    That’s been shown not to be true. 
    racerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 25
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    wood1208 said:
    OK,good statistics to be proud of. But, because even you want to revert install older IOS, you can't so it will always be upward upgrade. Good thing Apple supports older iPhone/iPad models with newer IOS unlike Android where you have to pray and hope to receive upgrade. but down side newer IOS feels slightly slower in performance on older iPhones. In some cases, I would not mind to either stay on older IOS and even go back.
    If you upgrade in the first few days, you can go back say 10 to 11 for a while.
    if you go 10 to 11.3, you can can't obviously but by that time you've had plenty of reviews to tell you if it is a good idea or not.
    It's your choice to do it or not. Security vs a very slight loss of possible usability (which is arguable, most of the losses in performances occur on early major versions that obviously have not been tuned / debugged enough with older phones and usually resolve themselves eventually).

    Only other options would be backporting security fixes accross all previous versions, both expensive (you have to QA all those hardware versions of special builds) and almost certainly introduces new security bugs in those special versions (regression bugs and new bugs).

    There is a reason even MS is moving more and more toward's Apple's way of doing things.
    From a security point of view, allowing people to stay on old versions is a mess.
    edited April 25 Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 25
    foggyhill said:
    dws-2 said:
    This is a true advantage Apple's iOS has over Android. I think they've damaged their advantage somewhat by the number of bugs in iOS 11, especially early on. I hope that iOS 12 is released with significantly less negative drama. Still, Apple should be commended for this upgrade rate. It's awesome, and part of what makes it so much more secure than Android.
    You realise that it's possible to be on an older version of Android but still have the most recent security patch right? Plus the apps are updated independently of the OS so any exploits in the apps are dealt with no matter which OS or patch you have. I've asked this plenty of times, does anyone here know anyone using Android that has had some security problem? I'm sure they are out there just I've never met any of them and I live in Europe where Android has >80% market share.
    Right... Give me a break, inform yourself , there is a shitload of bugs in the underneat layer and most of those are never updated past the first release. If there is a bug, they are sunk.

    Notice the FBI never talks about cracking Android... Why? Because it is TRIVIAL and you don't need 15K and brute forcing passwords to do it either.
    And yet there's still no one that has come forward with even anecdotal evidence that they know someone that has had a real world problem, not just some theoretical exploit. Obviously, I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but to suggest that it's a major advantage over Android is just regurgitating Apple marketing.
    muthuk_vanalingam
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