App Limits in iOS 12 lets users manage device time & parents set allowances

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 25
    nhtnht Posts: 4,496member
    arlomedia said:
    Looks good so far. I've used a couple third-party parental controls apps and they don't offer the app-level time allowances shown in the screen shots. The only thing better would be a parental controls API so third-party developers could offer more functionality in their products. I expect some of the third-party developers to step up their game now, to offer additional benefits compared to what's built into iOS, but their ability to override basic iOS functions like launching apps is pretty limited.
    Amusingly the ScreenTimeLabs app does that but only on Android.  The kids hate ScreenTime and some kids are mad at my kids because I told their parents about it.

    On iOS is just locks out all the apps during certain times so the trustworthy kid gets the iPhone she wanted with no limits and the other kid gets a beater android phone with screentime.  iOS12 will allow more fine grained control because the trustworthy one is pushing the limits as most teens will do.
  • Reply 22 of 25
    nhtnht Posts: 4,496member

    nht said:
    Screen Time will be a great help for parents in managing usage.  Judgmental jerks with no kids of their own or raised teens before 2010 need not comment on how modern parents don't need more effective tools because you have no clue.

    If this works well then it is the best new feature in iOS 12 for many many families.

    Fortunately, I'm the primary account so my wife can't use it on me.

    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!

    Rayz2016 said:
    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!
    Now their kids are only out of control before bedtime. 

    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!
    These are tools for weak parents, not capable ones. Capable parents manage their kids, they don't let the kids manage them.

    NHT:   Boy did you call that one!   ROFL....

    It amazes me that Apple provides a tool for parents to use -- or not -- as they choose and need.   And the crazies crawl out of the wood work screaming, crying and whining...

    If you don't want it, then don't use it!  But quit whining and complaining about those parents who DO care about their kids.
    Yah, because they simply don't get that some school systems use twitter, google docs, google hangouts, khan academy, IXL, canvas, etc for actual school work and kids use their phones and iPads for actual work as well as play.  Some kids you can trust to be responsible and others need more hard limits.

    Asshats assume that they are/were great parents when they simply won the genetic lottery.  I know many good parents that struggle with one sibling that is addicted to games or social media while the others are fine.  What?  They are both simulatenously capable and weak parents?  Setting both good and bad examples at the same time, in the same house with the same behaviors?

    Or maybe each kid is an individual and parents need different tools to set effective boundaries beyond just "take it away" and judgmental know-it-alls should just go pound sand.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 23 of 25
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,305member
    nht said:
    Screen Time will be a great help for parents in managing usage.  Judgmental jerks with no kids of their own or raised teens before 2010 need not comment on how modern parents don't need more effective tools because you have no clue.

    If this works well then it is the best new feature in iOS 12 for many many families.

    Fortunately, I'm the primary account so my wife can't use it on me.

    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!

    Rayz2016 said:
    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!
    Now their kids are only out of control before bedtime. 

    Not for me, but this is what parents say they've been clamoring for. Let the improved child rearing begin!
    These are tools for weak parents, not capable ones. Capable parents manage their kids, they don't let the kids manage them.

    NHT:   Boy did you call that one!   ROFL....

    It amazes me that Apple provides a tool for parents to use -- or not -- as they choose and need.   And the crazies crawl out of the wood work screaming, crying and whining...

    If you don't want it, then don't use it!  But quit whining and complaining about those parents who DO care about their kids.
    I think that group is among those who opined (one of them vehemently IIRC) that Apple wouldn't offer a feature like this as "others" have. Perhaps that's why they now ridicule the usefulness of what Apple chose to do despite their argument against it? 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 24 of 25
    nhtnht Posts: 4,496member
    jungmark said:
    It surprises me the people that does not understand how the brain works and how that is related to addictions and addictive behavior and why humans are so weak about addictions in general and of course why children should be protected from technology that’s what this feature is about.
    Amazing, to say the least.
    https://theconversation.com/debunking-the-6-biggest-myths-about-technology-addiction-95850

    People work out all the time. Are they addicted to the gym?
    From that article the dopamine chart would indicate that tech generates the same "addiction rate" as food and sex. Know any kids that eat too much sugar?  Or eat too little?  Is there a term for that?  Hmmm?

    3% of gamers having a problem sounds about right to me.  I've played games all my life (and I'm 50) from the early games like Wizardry on the Apple ][ to the latest apps in the iPhone.  Burned many hours in MMORPGs in guilds and clans and there were a few players that ended up playing so much they lost jobs, girlfriends or dropped out of school because of bad grades.  Before kids, I've taken vacation hours to play a new title...just because.

    3% sounds like a small number until it's your kid.  And yes, most are mild and you grow out of it but just like with eating disorders some folks need more help.  Both may be linked to depression or other underlying causes but they are a real thing.
  • Reply 25 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,310member
    nht said:
    jungmark said:
    It surprises me the people that does not understand how the brain works and how that is related to addictions and addictive behavior and why humans are so weak about addictions in general and of course why children should be protected from technology that’s what this feature is about.
    Amazing, to say the least.
    https://theconversation.com/debunking-the-6-biggest-myths-about-technology-addiction-95850

    People work out all the time. Are they addicted to the gym?
    From that article the dopamine chart would indicate that tech generates the same "addiction rate" as food and sex. Know any kids that eat too much sugar?  Or eat too little?  Is there a term for that?  Hmmm?

    3% of gamers having a problem sounds about right to me.  I've played games all my life (and I'm 50) from the early games like Wizardry on the Apple ][ to the latest apps in the iPhone.  Burned many hours in MMORPGs in guilds and clans and there were a few players that ended up playing so much they lost jobs, girlfriends or dropped out of school because of bad grades.  Before kids, I've taken vacation hours to play a new title...just because.

    3% sounds like a small number until it's your kid.  And yes, most are mild and you grow out of it but just like with eating disorders some folks need more help.  Both may be linked to depression or other underlying causes but they are a real thing.
    The word "addiction" is a clinical term with a very specific definition and criteria and no, gamers, would not meet that criteria. 
    But it is also a general use term to indicate that somebody is trapped by something and has (great) difficulty staying away from it.  And, anybody who consistently and knowingly puts gaming ahead of responsibilities like school, work or family has an addiction -- but in the general use sense of the term.
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