Watch 5 great new features in macOS Mojave

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    randywaltersrandywalters Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    My 2011 iMac won't be able to run Mojave despite being a very capable machine. This sucks! 
    You never know… there may be a workaround. I’m running High Sierra on my mid-2009 MacBook Pro that Apple EOLed at El Capitan, and it works perfectly – including seamless system updates. I installed this guy’s system patcher, no muss, no fuss… http://dosdude1.com/highsierra/ I’m hoping he’ll keep up this great work when Mojave comes out; we’ll see.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 29
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,748member
    Also, will the current screenshot keyboard shortcuts (e.g. entire screen = Shift-Command (⌘)-3... selected portion = Shift-Command-4... selected window = Shift-Command-4-spacebar... selected window without shadow = Shift-Command-4-spacebar-option) continue to work?
    They work fine, which is why Apple is using the number 5 instead of replacing this new feature with number 3. I didn't even know this new option existed until this article.

    Screenshots

    The new Screenshots Utility can be brought up by pressing Command-Shift-5, with it able to be moved around the screen. You have 3 screenshot options: Capture Entire Screen, Capture selected window, or capture selected portion.
    As someone who uses screenshots often I have remapped the keyboard shortcuts to make it easier and more natural to execute. I've made them Command-3 and Command-4. Neither interfere with any other pre-mapped keyboard shortcut so why also be forced to add the Shift key when it's not needed?

    I assume I'll be doing the same for this new screenshot option, but right now System Preferences » Keyboard pane » Shortcuts tab is not accessible on my Mojave installation. Even if Command-5 is mapped to something else, I'll probably just remap or disable that shortcut so that this new screenshot feature can be inline with the others for fast access.
  • Reply 23 of 29
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,748member
    Would someone please explain to me the deal with “Quick View?”  Why is Apple obsessed with trying to do things in a file without actually “opening” it?  Is it really that hard to doubleclick on a file, do your edits, and close it?  

    Im asking genuinely.  Apple makes such a big deal out of it and it doesn’t really look like it saves any effort to me.  
    I often have to go through a lot of files to find something specific and since they all enough similar text it had to done by site, not by doing a text search. QuickView makes this easier.

    However, I usually never have to add markup to a file in QuickView, but as fate would have it, on Thursday I had a bunch of files that were missing signatures—which is saved in Preview digitally—so I was able to quickly scour all the files quickly in QuickView add the signature, position and size it, and then move on to scour the next one with a single click.

    I didn't even know that was an option until I was using QuickView to do my first step or trying to locate the files that needed the signature added. Sure, I could've done all this in Preview, but it would've taken more time. to open up around 50 documents with multiple pages that needed to be manually checked.
    ttollertonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 29
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,285member
    lkrupp said:
    My 2011 iMac won't be able to run Mojave despite being a very capable machine. This sucks! 
    It may suck for you but time marches on. Your 2011 iMac doesn’t have the hardware to support the newer frameworks and features, and providing legacy support just causes bloat. The line has to be drawn somewhere and Apple has drawn that line. A friend of mine has a 9 year old HP laptop. When he checked if he could install Windows 10 it the answer was no. Finally, your 2011 iMac will continue to work just fine for years to come if you are now on High Sierra.
    Yep, I’m in the same boat with a loaded 2011 and it’s been a fine machine. But sometimes the new sexy requires...new sexy. 
    Ditto. I have a Mid 2011 MacBook Air that's still going strong. It's not winning any speed or battery races at this point, but the fact that it is as functional as is after several OS upgrades is a testament and one of the reasons I find Macs superior to windows machines.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 29
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,748member
    MplsP said:
    lkrupp said:
    My 2011 iMac won't be able to run Mojave despite being a very capable machine. This sucks! 
    It may suck for you but time marches on. Your 2011 iMac doesn’t have the hardware to support the newer frameworks and features, and providing legacy support just causes bloat. The line has to be drawn somewhere and Apple has drawn that line. A friend of mine has a 9 year old HP laptop. When he checked if he could install Windows 10 it the answer was no. Finally, your 2011 iMac will continue to work just fine for years to come if you are now on High Sierra.
    Yep, I’m in the same boat with a loaded 2011 and it’s been a fine machine. But sometimes the new sexy requires...new sexy. 
    Ditto. I have a Mid 2011 MacBook Air that's still going strong. It's not winning any speed or battery races at this point, but the fact that it is as functional as is after several OS upgrades is a testament and one of the reasons I find Macs superior to windows machines.
    Think back to when Apple would charge $129 for a macOS update. While they weren't annual releases, if the same pattern was still in play everyone with older Macs would've still paid a lot of extra money to keep their Macs running on the most modern version of macOS.

    And then there's macOS Server, which was far top high for most people, but more importantly has had all the most useful consumer-focused features folded into the standard macOS. I still have an old iMac with the round base that wouldn't act as a Time Machine server for all the other Macs in the house without having macOS server nee OS X Server nee Mac OS X Server installed. Even then, I never would've set up that old iMac that way if I wasn't able to find an old install for it for free on Apple's developer site because I wasn't going to fork over $999 for that one service. There are even macOS features I never thought would come over from macOS Server. Like Content Caching under System Preferences » Sharing.
    edited June 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 29
    mac'em xmac'em x Posts: 98member
    "Stacks brings the file organization option from the Dock to the desktop, by instantly organizing files into different stacks...."

    No. Mojave's Desktop Stacks don't bring any "organization option from the Dock" whatsoever.

    A "Stack" in the Dock is simply easy access to a folder (and its content) from the Dock, just as an app or a document icon in the Dock is simply an easy way to access that app or document. A Stack in the Dock doesn't do anything different from what a folder does (something the author of the above linked article, too, doesn't get). It's just a folder (or the Dock's representation of the folder); "i
    nstantly organizing files" is something that a Stack in the Dock expressly doesn't do.

    The new Stacks on the Desktop are not folders. They appear to be essentially a clean-up method, a way to automatically pile icons on top of each other, into groups based on file type (or some other criteria; haven't played with it yet). As far as I can see, Stacks are still just icons on the Desktop, though nicely "tidied up"; they do "instantly organize files" in that they'll dynamically incorporate new files added to the Desktop.

    Desktop Stacks and Dock Stacks are very different things, and I think it's odd for Apple to use the same term for both. As the name for what Mojave is doing on the Desktop, I like "Stacks". For folders in the Dock, I think the perfect term is simply "folders (in the Dock)".

    Hmm, question: What happens when you show the contents of the Desktop folder in a finder window, or in an Open/Save dialog, or in the window of a Desktop "Stack" in the Dock? Do the Desktop Stacks appear as Stacks in those windows, too?
  • Reply 27 of 29
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,663member
    Soli said:
    As someone who uses screenshots often I have remapped the keyboard shortcuts to make it easier and more natural to execute. I've made them Command-3 and Command-4. Neither interfere with any other pre-mapped keyboard shortcut so why also be forced to add the Shift key when it's not needed?
    CMD+(digit) jumps between tabs. CMD+1 opens the first tab, CMD+2 opens the second, etc.
  • Reply 28 of 29
    pakittpakitt Posts: 154member
    The new features are nice, but I don't think they call for a 10.x release. Rather a 10.x.x update.
    What are the really big changes (under the hood) that warrant a 10.x release? Dark mode?
  • Reply 29 of 29
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,663member
    pakitt said:
    The new features are nice, but I don't think they call for a 10.x release. Rather a 10.x.x update.
    What are the really big changes (under the hood) that warrant a 10.x release? Dark mode?
    Reports from a few months ago said Apple's focus at the moment is cleaning up code and fixing bugs, making new features a lower priority. If that's true, there may be improvements in performance and/or reliability/stability that are not apparent through casual observation.
Sign In or Register to comment.