Apple's Tim Cook drops to 96th place on list of CEOs most popular with workers

135

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 86
    Soli said:
    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because 
    I don't get why anyone is loyal to a company. My use of their products is based on my experience of their products. If they fail me or something better emerges I stop using them without question or hesitation. They owe me nothing else and I owe them nothing besides what is agreed upon ay the time of sale.
    Again with yet another negative-nancy take. Of all the dozens of points I made, which I feel have significant validity and salience, you chose to criticize (albeit lightly) something that's not even difficult to understand. I don't understand your pattern of engagement, but it is what it is, I suppose.

    I'm loyal based on not just my current experience of their products at this specific point in time, but also my past experience with Apple as a whole, my gratitude for that experience, my desire for that experience to continue, and my respect for Apple's values, which, 1) can partly compensate for things I dislike, and 2) leads me to hold Apple in higher esteem than other companies that don't uphold those values, or at least not to Apple's degree of rigor.
    propod
  • Reply 42 of 86
    Atomic77Atomic77 Posts: 64member
    Apple is what Apple is. I’m not really loyal to anyone but I like what i like and that’s that.
    Soli
  • Reply 43 of 86
    FolioFolio Posts: 698member
    Although I'm only an outsider, it seems pretty clear what's likely affecting the perception of Tim's performance and/or his popularity (and as Rogifan is pointing out, it doesn't seem to be anything catastraphic, given the glassdoor rating, Apple's ongoing success, etc.).

    Politics (maybe a little, but not in the way most think):
    As I said in a previous post (that was deleted because apparently people are a bit sensitive), although I think Tim is pushing it a bit much with the virtue signaling (he's a bit eager at times, and although he seems to pick his topics thoughtfully, they do happen to fall on one partisan side every time), I think he's overall doing a really good job with that stuff, particularly given the EXTREMELY one-sided nature of politics in silicon valley (is that ok to say??). If I had to guess, I think Tim's relative *lack* of virtue signaling (e.g. taking a very logical, reasonable stance of working with Trump), is actually hurting his rapport with one particular side of the political spectrum that tends to be.. very vocal, and which tends to deeply personalize political views in general.

    Apple performance:
    Apple has done amazingly well under his leadership.

    Work environment:
    Can't comment much on that. While sunday conference calls sounds a bit demanding, I'd kill to be working at the spaceship, and for the worlds best company, if I was in the technology field.

    Products:
    -hardware seems to be doing great, still miles ahead of any competition (if you can call them that). Focus on iOS is logical and necessary (and preferred as a general consumer). There's a few annoyances, but I don't think that affects many people (where the hell is AirPower and the inductive Air Pod case?).
    -core software: seems like that's gone along great, with the exception of this last keynote. This is the first keynote I've *ever* been bored with (since I started watching religiously in 2007/2008). Sill miles ahead of the so-called competition.

    SERVICES:
    I have to think that the stagnation and relative lack of improvement of so, so many of Apples services, which Apple consumers and employees depend on (and have/want to defend to others), must be the biggest morale killer. I'm sure I'm not the only one that's tried to be understanding and patient.. but we're almost 7 years out from siri's release, almost 6 years out from Maps release, and were still dealing with so many of the frustrations with basic functionality that should have been there, and was even promised, on day 1. Apple seems content to bury its head in the sand, consoling themselves with however many billions of siri queries they get (I wonder how many of those "queries" are: ""no, you dumb b____, I said ____ not ____"), or that that 50% of merchants use Apple Pay (that's why a coffee app, used at a place that accepts apple pay, beats them in transaction numbers, huh?), or think along the lines of "how hard could [Maps] be?" (cue) (yes, turns out they are difficult, and you've had nearly 7 years to fix it!). And am I not supposed to point out that the failures of carpool karaoke and planet of the apps doesn't bode well for Apple's future media ambitions? Also, a huge factor that no one seems to understand (absence does not mean it's not needed), is the lack of social integration in Apple's services: it was easy to predict animoji would't make much of a dent (lack of expression plus lack of personalization plus not very practical to use for social engagement), and I'm afraid mimoji (although finally getting to the personal expression part), may also be a failure due to impracticality (no one wants a goofy cartoon head on their real-life body, and sending video messages is impractical for 99% of social engagement); what Apple needs to do to make this work is to be able to 'freeze' and save your mimoji expressions to send on-the-fly during text messages (but, Apple never understands social, no matter what, for some reason). The lack of social is most glaring on apple's most social app: Apple Music (this would be a huge success if people were given the ability to create personal pages to express themselves and share with friends and family (currently, after nearly 3 years, all you can do is have a name, small circular profile pic, and share playlists; no other personalization, no ability to add commentary, no ability to customize layout or organize playlists.. on and on..).

    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because of Apple's amazing hardware and core software, Apple's focus on privacy and security, and because of Apple's general (and impressive) integrity as a company. However, the ongoing issues with services are incredibly frustrating.
    Especially like your idea to give social aspect to Apple Music.
    patchythepirate
  • Reply 44 of 86
    ElCapitan said:

    No wonder Tim Cook falls in staff ranking as under his “leadership” Apple has for all practical purposes

    • Gutted the Mac Pro product line
    • Gutted the Mac mini product line
    • Gutted the Displays product line
    • Gutted the Networking peripherals product line
    • Gutted macOS server
    • Crippled iWorks to the extent the 09 version still have more features
    • Handled the MacBook Pro product mix particularly bad in terms of performance vs thinness.
    • Increased the pressure on staff to deliver yearly major releases of not one operating system like under Steve Jobs, but now 4. This has both lead to an increase in issues and reduced quality, but it also draining on the developer community where particularly Indie developers with limited resources struggle to keep up. 

    It must be very discouraging to for long term staff to see the very foundation the company was built on, being decimated in this manner. It is also not a very encouraging picture for long term customers. 


    At the same time he and the company is spending a lot of time virtue signaling climate change, GLBT, internal US politics and this fantastic building they are working so hard on. 

    Particularly the consequence of the virtue signaling can be draining on staff both because staff may not necessarily at the personal level subscribe to the views of Tim Cook, yet they are being put in a position to defend them on behalf of the company. 

    For international staff company virtue signaling may be even more draining because the employee could work in a country that largely have resolved these issues up to decades ago, or they are completely taboo at the other end of the scale. They also can make the company seem fruity and less serious in the eyes of many customers and potential customers. Yet the employee is forced to front the official company profile.

    What hole have you been living in? "Gutted MacPro"……new one coming in 2019 for certain! "Gutted Mac Mini"……no one outside of Apple knows the future of the Mini, but I've read more stories about it's eventual revision. "Gutted Displays"……except they have at least one new one coming out with the MacPro, not to mention the fact that there are many great 4 & 5k displays that are compatible, excellent quality, and often a real bargain! Cook's hands-on approach to national and international problems is impressive, particularly when you consider that Cook is the ONLY Fortune 500 CEO with the guts to come out as gay. What are the odds that he's the only one! Answer: NONE! Finally, while Jobs was CEO, the company grew nicely, very much in part thanks to Cook. During Cook's tenure as CEO, he has turned Apple in the to most valuable company in history of the world.
    propod
  • Reply 45 of 86
    FolioFolio Posts: 698member
    I wonder what mix was on this survey-- Apple retail vs creatives etc. In any event, it's still a decent rating to me. Enjoyed seeing Tim Cook on recent Bloomberg show by Carlyle cofounder David Rubenstein, witty back and forth, heightened my respect.
  • Reply 46 of 86
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    Soli said:
    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because 
    I don't get why anyone is loyal to a company. My use of their products is based on my experience of their products. If they fail me or something better emerges I stop using them without question or hesitation. They owe me nothing else and I owe them nothing besides what is agreed upon ay the time of sale.
    Again with yet another negative-nancy take.
    Why do you think it's negative for me to not pledge allegiance to a corporation or brand?

    If you want an actual negative take on it, I could say that those that focus on brands names over functionality (which includes apparel and stickers with band logos on them) are people that tend to be insecure and lack personality, but my original comment was about your use of loyalty to a company, not people who care only about being associated with a certain brand, like when people complained that the Mac logo was no logo lit up which reduced the ability for others to see that they are using a Mac.
    edited June 2018
  • Reply 47 of 86
    sabonsabon Posts: 133member
    Apple is focusing on what makes them the most money, and what they THINK will make them the most money in the future. 

    For some reason mojies seem to be something they think will draw a lot of customers to their products. Or they think the lack of them will drive people away. Personally I couldn’t care less either way. But then I’m 57 and OLD beyond what anyone in their teens and twenties can comprehend. 

    I have an iPhone X. Not because I care or because I’m rich (I’m neither of those) but because of what I like for myself. I don’t care because my nieces and nephews already know I’m “old but cool” regardless if I have an iPhone X or not. I’m cool because I actually understand computers in general and I play multiple musical instruments and I actually care about THEM and not if they use mojies or not. I care about who and what they are as a whole including things that have absolutely nothing to do with computers. One of my nephews leads two different bands with two different styles of music. I think THAT is really cool. And he actually likes to jam on guitar and keyboard with me. COOL! 

    But we are talking about Apple. I like the iPhone X because of Face ID. That’s really the killer feature of the device and that it is faster than my iPhone 6 Plus. I love Face ID because of security when I’m buying things with my iPhone X like at McDonalds and nicer restaurants ($40-$80 for dinner) and any store (Starbucks) that lets me use it. Much faster than cash or credit cards. What is cash or credit cards? Does anyone still use those? lol

    I also have a 12.9” iPad Pro. I wish it had Face ID too and will buy a new one when they are selling that because it will “just work” and I don’t have to keep putting my thumb on my iPad all the time.

    FaceTime with up to 32 people? I’ll use up to maybe six but definitely 2 to 4 instead of that crappy Skype. Good riddance to that for multi-person audio/video calls.

    Apple sees that they and their developers are making less than 10% of what is being made on iPhone/iPad apps. It frustrates me that I can only afford an iMac Pro if I give up vacations and they aren’t updating the rest of the desktop line where I could afford both. Mac Mini cough cough. I get it though.

    As for having Sunday business calls if I’m already working Monday through Friday. I don’t work for Apple and I can FULLY understand why underlings aren’t as vested in Apple when I make less than 3% of what Tim Cook makes. Or that my yearly salary is the same that he makes in less than an hour. And he wonders why I’d rather do things with my wife and my nieces and nephews than be part of a business call on Sundays when I’m already putting in twelve hour days developing hardware/software? 

    Sorry if Tim Cook has no life outside of Apple as he doesn’t appear to. Why bother having a significant other if they are only around to see for an hour a day and maybe four hours on Saturday or maybe while/if they are traveling with you for Apple events and *might* get to talk to Tim Cook on the plane. If I saw my spouse and got to do that little with them I would kick them to the curb. But I’m not desperate to make millions let alone 10s of millions for myself. Sure I’d love to be able to spend 4 billion USD to buy a submarine with cameras all over the outside so I can have lots and lots of screens inside my sub so it looks like I’m swimming in the ocean and not in a sub (my personal wish list, probably not Tim Cook’s).

    When I see top executives making that much money and I’m not and they wonder why I don’t want to spend as much time at work as they do? That’s when I know they have their head up their own back side.
  • Reply 48 of 86
    nunzynunzy Posts: 662member
    Soli said:
    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because 
    I don't get why anyone is loyal to a company. My use of their products is based on my experience of their products. If they fail me or something better emerges I stop using them without question or hesitation. They owe me nothing else and I owe them nothing besides what is agreed upon ay the time of sale.
    But Apple products are different. By using Apple products, we are telling everybody something about ourselves. If Apple goes down, that aspect of us goes down, and we are no longer what we used to be. If people say bad things about Apple, they are saying bad things about us personally, because our purchases of Apple products defines who we are as people.
  • Reply 49 of 86
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    jdgaz said:
    You can please some of the people some of the time.
    Exactly. 
  • Reply 50 of 86
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member

    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    The folk who aren’t happy will complain. 
    Tbe folk who are happy will just be happy. 
    That general rule would be the same for all companies, so why has Cook fallen while others have risen?
    Because folk like to complain about Apple, even Apple employees. 
    edited June 2018 ericthehalfbee
  • Reply 51 of 86
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,174member
    I think he is economically a conservative, while a liberal in other issues. A good enough balance for me.
    Solipatchythepirate
  • Reply 52 of 86
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    nunzy said:
    Soli said:
    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because 
    I don't get why anyone is loyal to a company. My use of their products is based on my experience of their products. If they fail me or something better emerges I stop using them without question or hesitation. They owe me nothing else and I owe them nothing besides what is agreed upon ay the time of sale.
    But Apple products are different. By using Apple products, we are telling everybody something about ourselves. If Apple goes down, that aspect of us goes down, and we are no longer what we used to be. If people say bad things about Apple, they are saying bad things about us personally, because our purchases of Apple products defines who we are as people.
    Really? What people says about Apple products is tied to your self-esteem?

    How does that work?
    patchythepiratenunzy
  • Reply 53 of 86
    Soli said:
    Soli said:
    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because 
    I don't get why anyone is loyal to a company. My use of their products is based on my experience of their products. If they fail me or something better emerges I stop using them without question or hesitation. They owe me nothing else and I owe them nothing besides what is agreed upon ay the time of sale.
    Again with yet another negative-nancy take.
    Why do you think it's negative for me to not pledge allegiance to a corporation or brand?

    If you want an actual negative take on it, I could say that those that focus on brands names over functionality (which includes apparel and stickers with band logos on them) are people that tend to be insecure and lack personality, but my original comment was about your use of loyalty to a company, not people who care only about being associated with a certain brand, like when people complained that the Mac logo was no logo lit up which reduced the ability for others to see that they are using a Mac.
    Huh? That's not what I said. Not at all. You seem to make a few assumptions just with that first sentence:

    1) I was not talking about you in any way. You were referring to me in you previous post, and I was discussing my views about myself in my reply.

    2) Even if you made the inference that I was somehow indirectly referring to you, I was:
    -a) talking about loyalty, not "pledging allegiance" (false equivalence and/or straw-man on your part), and
    -b) regarding loyalty, I was just stating my reasons why I am loyal, not placing a value judgement on whether it is good or bad.

    3) You voiced criticism that I described myself as loyal to Apple. That is negative. It's not a big deal, as I mentioned when I said "albeit lightly", but negative nonetheless, and fitting with a pattern you seem to have with replying to my posts. I'm not even asking you not to do that, just pointing it out is all.


    I hope you're not making the assumption that I focus on brand name over functionality (a common myth that contributes to the false perception that apple fans are a 'cult'. I never said, or even insinuated that. As you may be able to tell from my original post, my self-professed loyalty does not dissuade me from criticizing Apple. I think we both agree that loyalty to a brand for the sake of it or for the 'look' of it is silly at best.

    My loyalty is based on Apple's pattern of very positive qualities that I personally value and which I also believe are universal qualities as well. I thought that was clear in my original post, but perhaps not.
    edited June 2018 propod
  • Reply 54 of 86
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,119member

    Soli said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    The folk who aren’t happy will complain. 
    Tbe folk who are happy will just be happy. 
    That general rule would be the same for all companies, so why has Cook fallen while others have risen?
    Numbers are probably down due to Apple’s push for inclusion and diversity.
    No, that’s probably just some bullshit you made up on the spot. 
    No.  Just an observation.  Perhaps u should open ur eyes and pay attention to what’s going on around you. 
    Happy to read your sources that suggest diversity and inclusion is why Cook is less popular. 

    What? No links? OK, then my point stands — that’s just some bullshit you made up. Cool. 

  • Reply 55 of 86
    Folio said:

    SERVICES:
    I have to think that the stagnation and relative lack of improvement of so, so many of Apples services, which Apple consumers and employees depend on (and have/want to defend to others), must be the biggest morale killer. I'm sure I'm not the only one that's tried to be understanding and patient.. but we're almost 7 years out from siri's release, almost 6 years out from Maps release, and were still dealing with so many of the frustrations with basic functionality that should have been there, and was even promised, on day 1. Apple seems content to bury its head in the sand, consoling themselves with however many billions of siri queries they get (I wonder how many of those "queries" are: ""no, you dumb b____, I said ____ not ____"), or that that 50% of merchants use Apple Pay (that's why a coffee app, used at a place that accepts apple pay, beats them in transaction numbers, huh?), or think along the lines of "how hard could [Maps] be?" (cue) (yes, turns out they are difficult, and you've had nearly 7 years to fix it!). And am I not supposed to point out that the failures of carpool karaoke and planet of the apps doesn't bode well for Apple's future media ambitions? Also, a huge factor that no one seems to understand (absence does not mean it's not needed), is the lack of social integration in Apple's services: it was easy to predict animoji would't make much of a dent (lack of expression plus lack of personalization plus not very practical to use for social engagement), and I'm afraid mimoji (although finally getting to the personal expression part), may also be a failure due to impracticality (no one wants a goofy cartoon head on their real-life body, and sending video messages is impractical for 99% of social engagement); what Apple needs to do to make this work is to be able to 'freeze' and save your mimoji expressions to send on-the-fly during text messages (but, Apple never understands social, no matter what, for some reason). The lack of social is most glaring on apple's most social app: Apple Music (this would be a huge success if people were given the ability to create personal pages to express themselves and share with friends and family (currently, after nearly 3 years, all you can do is have a name, small circular profile pic, and share playlists; no other personalization, no ability to add commentary, no ability to customize layout or organize playlists.. on and on..).

    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because of Apple's amazing hardware and core software, Apple's focus on privacy and security, and because of Apple's general (and impressive) integrity as a company. However, the ongoing issues with services are incredibly frustrating.
    Especially like your idea to give social aspect to Apple Music.
    Thanks, it really is strange just how difficult it is for Apple to understand the basic needs and functional dynamics of online social engagement.

    I actually just thought of a plausible explanation for Apple's persistent social blind spot (beyond just indifference). It's a wild guess, but maybe there's some truth to this:

    I'd bet that Apple execs rely a lot on their family, and for social in particular, kids/nieces/nephews/etc, for feedback on social apps and features  ->  Apple execs all seem like fantastic, nice, people, which I assume leads to the kids that are in their families also being very nice, agreeable, and even obsequious (I was like that as a kid)  ->  those kids are not going to want to say 'mean' things, even if it's productive, constructive criticism, so  ->  Apple execs get almost all positive feedback, even if the social aspects are extremely lacking.
  • Reply 56 of 86
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    Soli said:

    ... That may be good for the company, but it's not good for employees. If Apple wants to treat personnel as being highly expendable, that's fine, as those employees have the option to get jobs elsewhere...
    No, it's not fine to abuse employees. Why do you expect they can just get jobs elsewhere? Just because someone works at Apple doesn't mean they are in huge demand as an individual. Also, how could anyone ever trust that the next employer won't be similarly abusive, or worse?

    Employee abuse is never "fine". Also not "fine" is the mentality of treating employees like a commodity.

    Interesting (and disgusting) the article you shared regarding Amazon's employee treatment. Thanks for sharing that.
  • Reply 57 of 86
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    ElCapitan said:
    mike54 said:
    Totally agree as well.

    If the rating was done across staff, customers and shareholders, all three would very be different.
    My guess is that ratings from low to high would be:  customer, staff, shareholder

    You are probably right except it would depend on which customer segment you asked. The iPhone customers IMO have little reason to be unsatisfied, which I believe also is the case for Apple Watch customers. Apple TV is most likely more of a mixed bag, but the Macintosh customers have no reason to be happy. 
    Agreed, mostly. I'm not happy with where iPhone has gone since 2013 (iOS 7 started a long term reduction in OS quality). It's just not as bad as the alternatives, so here I stay for now.

    I've also been waiting since before 2013 to see Apple get serious about the Mac Pro again, so I definitely fit into your scale there.
  • Reply 58 of 86
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    So, is "divisive" the new euphemism to throw at people who stand for humane and ethical positions, just because they anger the status quo socially conservative/hostile corporatists?... or is that term also applied to the "world leaders" who are overtly hostile to humanitarian social issues?

    How are Cook's social politics negatively impacting Apple's bottom line? I'll tell you: not at all. I don't think we or Apple should walk on eggshells to appease the indignation of people turned off by a CEO who supports ethics and humane ideologies. Such people are on the wrong side of history... repeatedly. One would think that looking at the [slow and incomplete] progress on social equity, a business-minded individual would want to support a company who's leadership is aligned with inevitable progress, not those aligned with callous disregard or active opposition to social equity. If they think social equity is a threat to capitalism, they're likely doing capitalism wrongly and are part of the problem.

    Tim Cook's social politics are the only thing I like about him at this point. I don't like anything he's doing with Apple's business. I don't care about stock market gambling or profit margins. As a customer of their product, I only care about the quality of the product and it is not where it was years ago.

    I think Cook is driving Apple into a path of deep self-injury by focusing all efforts on feeding shareholder lust / Wall Street pathology.

    I'm not in any position to benefit from Cook's social politics; I just respect him using his position to promote humanitarian and ethical ideologies, rather than being callously "neutral" like most corporations. I find it hard to support the notion of kicking him out, even with his poor product leadership, because I value society over my own personal product usage experiences.
  • Reply 59 of 86
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    Soli said:
    You said it. You said they gutted macOS Server… which they did by putting the most used features into macOS for all customers to use and repeatedly dropped the price as they moved features into macOS
    Not exactly. Back in the days up to Lion, Mac certified server management training insisted on using the Server Admin Utility for everything, which has been discontinued for quite a few years now. Sure you can administer any UNIX based OS through the command line but that is not how Apple used to do it. So yeah they gutted it mostly because it sucked and since the demise of Xserve almost no one was interested in OS X server. Web servers are currently about 50/50 between Linux and Windows but office servers are about 90%+ Windows. So just like their other discontinued products Server was a money loser.
  • Reply 60 of 86
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    Although I'm only an outsider, it seems pretty clear what's likely affecting the perception of Tim's performance and/or his popularity (and as Rogifan is pointing out, it doesn't seem to be anything catastraphic, given the glassdoor rating, Apple's ongoing success, etc.).

    Politics (maybe a little, but not in the way most think):
    As I said in a previous post (that was deleted because apparently people are a bit sensitive), although I think Tim is pushing it a bit much with the virtue signaling (he's a bit eager at times, and although he seems to pick his topics thoughtfully, they do happen to fall on one partisan side every time), I think he's overall doing a really good job with that stuff, particularly given the EXTREMELY one-sided nature of politics in silicon valley (is that ok to say??). If I had to guess, I think Tim's relative *lack* of virtue signaling (e.g. taking a very logical, reasonable stance of working with Trump), is actually hurting his rapport with one particular side of the political spectrum that tends to be.. very vocal, and which tends to deeply personalize political views in general.

    Apple performance:
    Apple has done amazingly well under his leadership.

    Work environment:
    Can't comment much on that. While sunday conference calls sounds a bit demanding, I'd kill to be working at the spaceship, and for the worlds best company, if I was in the technology field.

    Products:
    -hardware seems to be doing great, still miles ahead of any competition (if you can call them that). Focus on iOS is logical and necessary (and preferred as a general consumer). There's a few annoyances, but I don't think that affects many people (where the hell is AirPower and the inductive Air Pod case?).
    -core software: seems like that's gone along great, with the exception of this last keynote. This is the first keynote I've *ever* been bored with (since I started watching religiously in 2007/2008). Sill miles ahead of the so-called competition.

    SERVICES:
    I have to think that the stagnation and relative lack of improvement of so, so many of Apples services, which Apple consumers and employees depend on (and have/want to defend to others), must be the biggest morale killer. I'm sure I'm not the only one that's tried to be understanding and patient.. but we're almost 7 years out from siri's release, almost 6 years out from Maps release, and were still dealing with so many of the frustrations with basic functionality that should have been there, and was even promised, on day 1. Apple seems content to bury its head in the sand, consoling themselves with however many billions of siri queries they get (I wonder how many of those "queries" are: ""no, you dumb b____, I said ____ not ____"), or that that 50% of merchants use Apple Pay (that's why a coffee app, used at a place that accepts apple pay, beats them in transaction numbers, huh?), or think along the lines of "how hard could [Maps] be?" (cue) (yes, turns out they are difficult, and you've had nearly 7 years to fix it!). And am I not supposed to point out that the failures of carpool karaoke and planet of the apps doesn't bode well for Apple's future media ambitions? Also, a huge factor that no one seems to understand (absence does not mean it's not needed), is the lack of social integration in Apple's services: it was easy to predict animoji would't make much of a dent (lack of expression plus lack of personalization plus not very practical to use for social engagement), and I'm afraid mimoji (although finally getting to the personal expression part), may also be a failure due to impracticality (no one wants a goofy cartoon head on their real-life body, and sending video messages is impractical for 99% of social engagement); what Apple needs to do to make this work is to be able to 'freeze' and save your mimoji expressions to send on-the-fly during text messages (but, Apple never understands social, no matter what, for some reason). The lack of social is most glaring on apple's most social app: Apple Music (this would be a huge success if people were given the ability to create personal pages to express themselves and share with friends and family (currently, after nearly 3 years, all you can do is have a name, small circular profile pic, and share playlists; no other personalization, no ability to add commentary, no ability to customize layout or organize playlists.. on and on..).

    As a fan and customer I'm still very loyal to Apple because of Apple's amazing hardware and core software, Apple's focus on privacy and security, and because of Apple's general (and impressive) integrity as a company. However, the ongoing issues with services are incredibly frustrating.
    A bold move Cook could make would be to promote that new Google hire to a SVP and strip Eddy Cue of all non content duties. Move Cue to LA and have him focus 100% on Apple’s content businesses.
    patchythepirate
Sign In or Register to comment.