What six years of Retina MacBook Pro evolution gets you

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited July 2018
Apple's 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro has come a long way since the first Retina models were unveiled in 2012. AppleInsider looks at all the changes that six years have wrought.

The new 2018 MacBook Pro models


Apple on Thursday unveiled the latest refresh of the MacBook Pro line. The new line features quite a few new features that improve on the most recent MacBook Pro lines, introduced in 2016 and 2017.

The new line includes Apple's True Tone technology, previously only available on the iPad Pro, while also adding "Hey, Siri" functionality and a new version of the butterfly key mechanism. And while the base model 13-inch model is mostly unchanged, the Touch Bar model now uses the T2 Chip.

AppleInsider has already compared the 2018 13-inch MacBook Pro to its immediate predecessor.





While there are significant differences between the 2017 and 2018 13-inch MacBook Pro models, the differences between the new 15-inch MacBook Pro and the 2012 model with Retina Display are much more pronounced.

Birth of the Retina Display Mac

While the Retina Display made its overall debut on the iPhone 4 in 2010, it made its first appearance on a MacBook with the Retina MacBook Pro line that was introduced in 2012.

That line was unveiled at the WWDC in June of that year by Phil Schiller.

"You want a next-generation MacBook Pro to have a killer new display," Schiller said to cheers. "You want it to have an architecture built for the future. You want it to be radically thin and light. And of course you want it to be bold and embrace the newest technologies, to be willing to discard the old legacy things so you can make something unlike any other notebook that's been made to date."





Schiller touted both the display and thinness of the 2012 version, but six years later both have improved, along with other aspects of the Retina MacBook Pro.

Let's look, one by one, at the biggest differences between the original Retina MacBook Pro and the current one, going by the 15-inch models:

Screen

Both the 2012 and 2018 editions offer Apple's Retina Display, but the newest version is more advanced.

The 2012 version offered 2880-by-1800 resolution at 220 pixels per inch, along with around 300 nits brightness. The new version starts at 2880-by-1800 native resolution at 220 pixels per inch and 500 nits brightness.

The new version, meanwhile, offers TrueTone technology, which was not available in any previous model.

As AppleInsider explained on July 12, TrueTone technology is an Apple innovation which maintains the white balance of the display the same in appearance to the user, regardless of the ambient light around the screen. The system works by using the four-channel sensors to detect the ambient light that can affect the perception of the display.

The purpose of the technology is to avoid straining of the eyes or other discomfort, as well as avoiding user exposure to blue-colored light.

The new 2018 MacBook Pro


Graphics-wise, the 2012 edition offered Intel HD Graphics 4000, along with NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of GDDR5 memory, with automatic graphics switching. The new Retina MacBook Pro version offers Intel UHD Graphics 630, with Radeon Pro 555X or 560X with 4GB of GDDR5 memory and also has automatic graphics switching.

Processor

The 2012 Retina MacBook Pro model came equipped with a 2.7GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.7GHz).

The new model, meanwhile, offers 2.2GHz 6-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 4.1GHz, with 9MB shared L3 cache, or a 2.6GHz 6-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 4.3GHz, with 9MB shared L3 cache, depending on the model. The 2018 edition is configurable to 2.9GHz 6-core Intel Core i9, Turbo Boost up to 4.8GHz, with 12MB shared L3 cache.

That's an increased clock speed, but not by a significant amount. That is likely related to Intel's slowing down of their chip innovation cycle, which was expected in 2016 to lead to longer amounts of time between MacBook refreshes. Reports earlier this year stated that Apple is looking to drop Intel in favor of its own chips starting in 2020.

Apple claims "70 percent faster performance" with the 2018 MacBook Pro versus the 2017. Indeed, the initial Geekbench scores for the new 15-inch MacBook Pro show a range of between 4343 and 5317 for single-core and 14375 through 22439 for multicore depending on configuration.

Geekbench Macbook Pro 2018


Geekbench posted a multi-core score of 3456 single-core and 13484 for the high-end, 2.7 GHz $3400 configuration of the 2012 Retina MacBook Pro.

Battery

At the time of its release, the MacBook Pro of 2012 touted up to seven hours of wireless web browsing, with a built-in 95-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery.

The 2018 edition advertises up to 10 hours of both wireless web and iTunes movie playback, with an 83.6-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery.

Size and weight

The 2012 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro 2012 weighs 4.46 pounds (2.02 kg) and is 0.71 inches (1.8 cm) thick.

MacBook 2018 size


The new version of the 15-inch MacBook Pro is lighter and thinner. It weighs 4.02 pounds (1.83 kg), and is just 0.61 inches (1.55 cm) thick.

In addition, the bezel is much thinner on the 2018 MacBook Pro.

Ports and chargers

Here's one category that illustrates just how much MacBook design has changed over the last six years.

The 2012 Retina 15-inch MacBook used a MagSafe 2 power port, two original Thunderbolt ports, one HDMI port, two 5 gigabit per second USB 3.0 type A ports, and a SD card reader.

USB-C ports


The new 15-inch MacBook Pro offers four 40 gigabit per second Thunderbolt 3 USB-C ports utilizing the USB-C connector. It can also connect to VGA, HDMI, and Thunderbolt 2 via adapters or by USB-C to HDMI or DisplayPort cables.

Apple's use of fast charging USB-C ports, while continuing to use basic 5-watt adapters, has been a matter of much controversy among Apple users. However, adapters for USB-C-to-other cables are widely available, as are Thunderbolt 3 docs.

Audio

The 2012 edition offered stereo speakers with subwoofer, dual microphones and audio line in and out.

The new MacBook Pro offers stereo speakers with high dynamic range, a trio of microphones and a 3.5 mm headphone jack.

Additional features

In addition to all of that, the 2018 MacBook Pro offers a variety of features that didn't exist yet when the 2012 model was unveiled. This includes the Touch Bar, "Hey Siri," and TouchID authentication.

Mojave dark mode


And while the 2012 Retina MacBook Pro was contemporary with OS X Mountain Lion and will support Mojave in the fall, the 2018 edition supports High Sierra now, and Mojave when it's released this fall.

Time to upgrade?

So you've been the owner of a Retina MacBook Pro from the 2012 generation and you're thinking about upgrading. Deciding whether or not now is the time to do so depends on several factors.

If you're not a fan of USB-C, or you're not happy with the speed of Intel's chip innovations, or new features like the TouchBar or "Hey, Siri" don't matter to you, or you're simply happy with what you're getting from the 2012 model, you may be better off holding off for now. But, getting it serviced by Apple might be a problem.

While the 2012 Retina MacBook Pro remains a fine machine that's held up reasonably well over time, the 2012 device is headed for obsolescence, and repairs at Apple's retail stores will likely no longer be possible before the year is up.

On the other hand, the new Retina MacBook Pro is a clear improvement over the original. The display, speed, and battery life are better, and you'll have the advantage of a brand new machine over one that's several years old. And, Thunderbolt 3 with USB-C might be painful at first, but won't kill you.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    rezwitsrezwits Posts: 607member
    I have had a 2017 15" for a year, and I am not kidding, not one crash, unlike my 2011 17" (once or twice a month).  The only thing that has failed is ForkLift, (great program btw), but that was system related and I had to run a terminal command at startup and launch it.

    NOT ONE CRASH.  For over a year...
    edited July 2018 macxpressMisterKitcurtis hannahwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 27
    superk9superk9 Posts: 11member
    Did I miss mentions re: the price differential and keyboard comparisons?
    aylkjeffharrisdysamoriacurtis hannahigohmmm
  • Reply 3 of 27
    seankillseankill Posts: 462member
    Aside from replacing the screen at 15 months for the stupid ghosting issue (was assured it wouldn’t be an issue), my mid-2012 MacBook Pro retina has been a great machine, wish I could have afforded 512Gb at the time as I have windows on it too. 

    I just noticed yesterday it was added to the list of retired devices while checking the warranty coverage of my AppleTV gen 4 because it wouldn’t power on. Ordered a 20$ fire stick instead of $119 replacement.

    Anyway, in regards to the MacBook, the battery is original and it seems to be hanging around 88-91% of its original capacity. I have a question to the community, should I try to get the battery replaced now if I want it to last another 3 years as my main device before it becomes my wife’s? The battery has about 300 cycles on it, made a habit of plugging it in at school because the battery didn’t last long when running engineering software anyway. 
    The 2018 MacBook is the first one that even makes me think about upgrading but holding off due to the lack of HDMI and USB 3.0. Plus the Touch Bar is a solution without a problem. More of a marketing differentiator, seems like it will require the user to look at the keyboard, something most 30 and younger never need to do. 
    edited July 2018 curtis hannah
  • Reply 4 of 27
    Torn between Airs and MBs and MBPs, I'm still rocking my mid-2009 13" MBP with blazing fast, rock-solid 10.6. It can get hot and heavy while covering meetings, but maybe some day it will be dead, cold and alone.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 27
    AppleishAppleish Posts: 111member
    My 2016 MBP Touch Bar is rock solid. Keyboard and all.
  • Reply 6 of 27
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    dysamoriaigohmmm
  • Reply 7 of 27
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,433administrator
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Not more money.

    FTA: "Geekbench posted a multi-core score of 3456 single-core and 13484 for the high-end, 2.7 GHz $3400 configuration of the 2012 Retina MacBook Pro."

    Less functionality is a matter of opinion, workflow, and imagination. Thunderbolt 3 speeds and universality is a game changer, and not in a bad way.

    They're both great machines, for different reasons. 
    edited July 2018 king editor the gratemacxpressracerhomie3watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 27
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,828member
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Oh boy here we go with the dongle BS. You don't need a dongle, just a different cable 99.9% of the time. Honestly with Thunderbolt/USB-C, its more versatile than any other MacBook Pro because you can connect nearly ANYTHING to it with the correct cable (NOT A DONGLE). 

    So I guess Apple is just supposed to sit there and continuously support older technology. If you want continuous support of old technology then go buy an HP Sphincter. 

    If this was really an issue, the laptop wouldn't be as successful as it is today. 
    edited July 2018 jeffharrisracerhomie3watto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 9 of 27
    henrybayhenrybay Posts: 79member
    You forgot to mention that the 2012 MacBook Pro has a fabulous keyboard. The new keyboard is terrible by comparison, with hardly any key travel. 
    superk9
  • Reply 10 of 27
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,647member
    macxpress said:
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Oh boy here we go with the dongle BS. You don't need a dongle, just a different cable 99.9% of the time. Honestly with Thunderbolt/USB-C, its more versatile than any other MacBook Pro because you can connect nearly ANYTHING to it with the correct cable (NOT A DONGLE). 

    So I guess Apple is just supposed to sit there and continuously support older technology. If you want continuous support of old technology then go buy an HP Sphincter. 

    If this was really an issue, the laptop wouldn't be as successful as it is today. 
    Then you have to carry the cables instead of a dongle. You can’t just rock up to somewhere and expect to be able to just grab the correct cable lying around. Especially in say, a school situation.
    markovich
  • Reply 11 of 27
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,828member
    entropys said:
    macxpress said:
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Oh boy here we go with the dongle BS. You don't need a dongle, just a different cable 99.9% of the time. Honestly with Thunderbolt/USB-C, its more versatile than any other MacBook Pro because you can connect nearly ANYTHING to it with the correct cable (NOT A DONGLE). 

    So I guess Apple is just supposed to sit there and continuously support older technology. If you want continuous support of old technology then go buy an HP Sphincter. 

    If this was really an issue, the laptop wouldn't be as successful as it is today. 
    Then you have to carry the cables instead of a dongle. You can’t just rock up to somewhere and expect to be able to just grab the correct cable lying around. Especially in say, a school situation.
    Um we have the older (and apparently better) MacBook Pro's and we've never used the USB ports or really any port on them and we've been using Macs for 10yrs! I see this as a non-issue. Who the hell buys a laptop, and then needs to constantly connect things to it when being remote? You buy a laptop to be portable...to be wireless in most cases, not to be constantly tethered. Its not like you didn't need to carry around a mini-display port to VGA/DVI/HDMI adapter for video, or a thunderbolt to ethernet adapter with the older (and apparently better) models. 

    This is a non-issue and again I'll reiterate, if it this was as big of an issue as people make it out to be, Apple wouldn't be selling these in the numbers they do. 
    edited July 2018 watto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 12 of 27
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,828member

    henrybay said:
    You forgot to mention that the 2012 MacBook Pro has a fabulous keyboard. The new keyboard is terrible by comparison, with hardly any key travel. 
    And yet it gets praises by some and others don't like it. There were also others who hated the "old" keyboard. It goes both ways bud. 
    racerhomie3watto_cobrajeffharris
  • Reply 13 of 27
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,433administrator
    entropys said:
    macxpress said:
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Oh boy here we go with the dongle BS. You don't need a dongle, just a different cable 99.9% of the time. Honestly with Thunderbolt/USB-C, its more versatile than any other MacBook Pro because you can connect nearly ANYTHING to it with the correct cable (NOT A DONGLE). 

    So I guess Apple is just supposed to sit there and continuously support older technology. If you want continuous support of old technology then go buy an HP Sphincter. 

    If this was really an issue, the laptop wouldn't be as successful as it is today. 
    Then you have to carry the cables instead of a dongle. You can’t just rock up to somewhere and expect to be able to just grab the correct cable lying around. Especially in say, a school situation.
    Going anyplace that you know you'll have to connect, expecting you can "rock up" with cables on the premises has always been a super-bad idea, and an invitation for failure.
    bonobobwooliemarkovichwatto_cobramacxpressjeffharrisfastasleep
  • Reply 14 of 27
    macxpress said:
    entropys said:
    macxpress said:
    markovich said:
    So, more $ for less functionality.

    My 2013 MBPr has 16 GB RAM, 500GB SSD , MagSafe, plenty of USB ports ( USB 3), SD slot, 2 Thunderbolt ports ( rarely used) and HDMI.
     Its a complete self contained system with no need to lug around stupid dongles. I recently also bought my son a refurbed 2015 version as its the last model to not be crippled by only Apple's mindless use of ONLY USB C.



    Oh boy here we go with the dongle BS. You don't need a dongle, just a different cable 99.9% of the time. Honestly with Thunderbolt/USB-C, its more versatile than any other MacBook Pro because you can connect nearly ANYTHING to it with the correct cable (NOT A DONGLE). 

    So I guess Apple is just supposed to sit there and continuously support older technology. If you want continuous support of old technology then go buy an HP Sphincter. 

    If this was really an issue, the laptop wouldn't be as successful as it is today. 
    Then you have to carry the cables instead of a dongle. You can’t just rock up to somewhere and expect to be able to just grab the correct cable lying around. Especially in say, a school situation.
    Um we have the older (and apparently better) MacBook Pro's and we've never used the USB ports or really any port on them and we've been using Macs for 10yrs! I see this as a non-issue. Who the hell buys a laptop, and then needs to constantly connect things to it when being remote? You buy a laptop to be portable...to be wireless in most cases, not to be constantly tethered. Its not like you didn't need to carry around a mini-display port to VGA/DVI/HDMI adapter for video, or a thunderbolt to ethernet adapter with the older (and apparently better) models. 

    This is a non-issue and again I'll reiterate, if it this was as big of an issue as people make it out to be, Apple wouldn't be selling these in the numbers they do. 
    Yes you do actually in many work environments. Im an IT contractor and I frequently have to connect to customer older projectors, and sometimes a ethernet connection to be inside production networks. I work in customer environments and have to adapt to them. My kit includes a Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapter and a VGA adapter for those older projectors. Many newer ones are wireless, but many require the projector vendor's app to be installed for access. All newer ones tho have an HDMI port those so THATS my connection. 
    While my clients MAY have a public wifi, they also limit access to core systems from the public wifi ( rightly so!). Not everything is wireless, nor should it be. Thunderbolt accessories are expensive and not as ubiquitous as needed to be market friendly. Ive always enjoyed the MagSafe power connector as it also has been a lifesaver a few times.

    My kids use USB jump drives all the time for school and are required to have them by our schools. I also shoot photography for the local HS marching band and use the SD slot out in the field all the time with my Nikon DSLR. Yes it has a wifi/BT option to transfer files, however, Nikon's implementation is slow, unreliable and a huge battery drain on the camera so its a no. I'm thankful for that SD slot as its saved my arse on a few occasions, and the fact I didnt need to carry around some adapter.  So, while YOU may have rarely used the extra ports that does not mean other don't as well. 

    No one is asking Apple to support outdated technology, just current technology until such time the market changes appreciably. I bought the first Gen iMac and never missed a floppy drive, and enjoyed the new USB technology. I honestly think Apple moved before the market did and could easily continue one model with the multiple USB and SD ports without compromising updated designs. 

    Oh and Ive been using Macs since my first one, a new SE/30 in 1990 right out of college.. Ive had Powerbooks, Quadras, PowerMacs, iMacs, Mac Pros, so your 10 year experience doesn't really care much weight.
    edited July 2018 jeffharris
  • Reply 15 of 27
    adybadyb Posts: 184member
    Still loving my mid 2012 rMBP which is the best computer I have ever owned. Day to day usage is less than when I bought it due to using my iPad, but I love the fact I can just close the lid, go back to it a week or so later & after approx 6 seconds it is ready to be used (with only 5/6% battery loss).

    The only thing I have changed is fitting a 480GB SSD in place of the original 256GB drive it came with (which is now used as a USB drive).

    A quality piece of kit!
  • Reply 16 of 27
    wooliewoolie Posts: 34member
    I agree with entropy's comments, and as usual apple fanboys defend every bad decision Apple makes...  I've been living with an Apple USB-C laptop for almost 4 years & the first 2 years one could hardly find any USB-3 product anywhere & when you did, the product was 20 to 30 per cent higher to comparable products...  I use my laptop almost exclusively & travel a lot & carry over 10 various cords to hook up to variety of other products because of the Apple's solo USB-C connectivity issues & I am not remotely a power user...  Apple genius's call it advancing technology, but fails to use USB-C with their other products creating for the user a giant snake pit of wires & that is the REAL world...  Apple has totally abandoned Mac customers...   Apple spends their money on Hollywood trying to make tv programs/movies & other money losing projects, while giving Mac user's a few crumbs...   90% of the Mac improvements in this article have been due to Intel's speed bumps, while Apple increased the screen nits from 300 to 500 & refining keyboards to make them work...  This article shows how bad Apple has totally lost its way... 
  • Reply 17 of 27
    superk9superk9 Posts: 11member
    henrybay said:
    You forgot to mention that the 2012 MacBook Pro has a fabulous keyboard. The new keyboard is terrible by comparison, with hardly any key travel. 
    My mid-2012 MBPro Retina has 16g, 250g memory six ports has been a champion. Price: $2,399. With the exception of a system crash earlier this year (2017) and earlier screen replacement, it has served me very, very well. Thankfully the crash was not a hardware crash, but it took three+ weeks and lots of time to recover. Love the keyboard I'm typing on right now, and don't mind its weight and size, just hope it can last until something better comes along -- at a reasonable price. Are you listening, Apple?
  • Reply 18 of 27
    Like Adyb my 2012 rMBP was my favourite computer to use. It still has the ghosting screen issue, as it never bothered me enough to get it replaced under the repair program. And after upgrading the drive to a 1TB drive it was a tremendously great machine for my work use-case.

    When I was contemplating the upgrade to the 2017, I truely struggled with the notion about how little seems to have changed in 5 years. Sure, faster processor, faster SSD but in general terms the machine was more or less the same. In my case, my hand was forced by the company's IT department moving to support Macs (previously unless you were part of a special club all Macs were BYOD) and the chosen model and specification was a true travesty for my work use-case. [Think 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD]

    So, I purchased the top model 2017 rMBP with a 1TB drive. If I could have waited for the 2018 I would have but it is was it is. 

    The machine is like a refreshed model of what I already had, but it's a nice refresh. 

    The keyboard takes some getting used to, and is still a little nosier than I would like but with a silicon cover in place from day one, hopefully my habit of eating lunch over my machine will not result in an issue.

    The USB-C "issue" was really a non-issue from the start. Most data I host on the machine or access via one Cloud / Online Storage Mechanism or another. I bought a dongle so I can connect to Ethernet or Projectors when the need arises and an adapter for USB Drives and Keys etc when I don't want to bother with the dongle.

    I would have no issue recommending the MBP to anybody but would suggest if they are getting a 2016 or 2017 they put a keyboard cover in place from the beginning to reduce the chance of an issue due to dust or crumbs.
  • Reply 19 of 27
    seankillseankill Posts: 462member
    superk9 said:
    henrybay said:
    You forgot to mention that the 2012 MacBook Pro has a fabulous keyboard. The new keyboard is terrible by comparison, with hardly any key travel. 
    My mid-2012 MBPro Retina has 16g, 250g memory six ports has been a champion. Price: $2,399. With the exception of a system crash earlier this year (2017) and earlier screen replacement, it has served me very, very well. Thankfully the crash was not a hardware crash, but it took three+ weeks and lots of time to recover. Love the keyboard I'm typing on right now, and don't mind its weight and size, just hope it can last until something better comes along -- at a reasonable price. Are you listening, Apple?
    I noticed you replaced the screen on your mid-2012. Was it for the “very isolated” LG monitor ghosting issue? I know it was for me. 

    Like Adyb my 2012 rMBP was my favourite computer to use. It still has the ghosting screen issue, as it never bothered me enough to get it replaced under the repair program. And after upgrading the drive to a 1TB drive it was a tremendously great machine for my work use-case.

    When I was contemplating the upgrade to the 2017, I truely struggled with the notion about how little seems to have changed in 5 years. Sure, faster processor, faster SSD but in general terms the machine was more or less the same. In my case, my hand was forced by the company's IT department moving to support Macs (previously unless you were part of a special club all Macs were BYOD) and the chosen model and specification was a true travesty for my work use-case. [Think 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD]

    So, I purchased the top model 2017 rMBP with a 1TB drive. If I could have waited for the 2018 I would have but it is was it is. 

    The machine is like a refreshed model of what I already had, but it's a nice refresh. 

    The keyboard takes some getting used to, and is still a little nosier than I would like but with a silicon cover in place from day one, hopefully my habit of eating lunch over my machine will not result in an issue.

    The USB-C "issue" was really a non-issue from the start. Most data I host on the machine or access via one Cloud / Online Storage Mechanism or another. I bought a dongle so I can connect to Ethernet or Projectors when the need arises and an adapter for USB Drives and Keys etc when I don't want to bother with the dongle.

    I would have no issue recommending the MBP to anybody but would suggest if they are getting a 2016 or 2017 they put a keyboard cover in place from the beginning to reduce the chance of an issue due to dust or crumbs.

    I had the same ghosting issue. Along with 3 laptops at bestbuy. “Isolated issue” my a$$. I don’t think there was a repair program for this, was there? If so, can you provide a source?
    superk9
  • Reply 20 of 27
    superk9superk9 Posts: 11member
    Never had a ghosting issue.  Apple replaced it because of some pixel concerns.  Haven't had an issue with the screen since....
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