Tested: Apple's patch fixes the thermal slowdowns in the 2018 i9 MacBook Pro

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 98
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,541member
    Sorry, but I don't believe it.  I read on the Internet that Apple's MBP design isn't capable of reaching the target clock speeds, and that is all I need to know.  A YouTube blogger clearly knows more about this than Apple.  No doubt Apple has already silenced him....
    pk22901andrewj5790williamlondonnetmagelamboaudi4randominternetpersonsteven n.
  • Reply 22 of 98
    Just guess:
    the new CPU has the different speed up curve, depends on the workload input, temperature..etc., and 2018 MBP recognize it is as the old one (missing digital key),
    then, Apple fix it, the cpu speed up curve run smoothly and pull up the average speed, and it regulate the generation of heat too, so the fan doesn't kick in earlier or higher speed, if my guessing is correct,
    there should be some benchmark software to showing this in graphically.
    edited July 2018 cgWerks
  • Reply 23 of 98
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,516administrator
    Mike, what's your (hot) take on the temperature of the i9 MBP under load?
    The chip itself will periodically surge to just below 100C which is fine. However, the fans and heat pipes bring it down by 20F very rapidly when the clock speed decreases to around the rated speed.

    This is a solid patch. In all likelihood, this will be the last standalone article about this until we publish the full reviews of our gear later this week.


    (edit, not F, C)
    edited July 2018 cgWerksroundaboutnowchiaAlex1Nwilliamlondondws-2fastasleep
  • Reply 24 of 98
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,516administrator

    mindwaves said:
    I hate synthetic benchmarks. What happened to Macworld events where "actual" performance numbers were given using real world applications like PS, Quake, etc? (not to say that Appleinsider and that Youtube guy didn't have real benchmarks)
    We agree. They never tell the whole story.

    This is why we had times to render actual jobs we've done here at AI in this piece.
    roundaboutnowchiaAlex1Nwilliamlondonnetmagebb-15
  • Reply 25 of 98
    auseause Posts: 2member
    This isn't just an Apple problem, I'm seeing a very similar issue on a brand new Dell XPS 15 with the i9-8950HK. The CPU won't go above the 2.9Ghz base clock speed unless it is under-volted using the Intel Extreme Tuning utility. Once under-volted it can sit at around 3.4Ghz but still never gets anywhere near the advertised 4.8Ghz burst speed that's advertised. There's a good chance that manufacturers have designed systems around the 45W TDP claim before having access to the i9 chips, now that the chips are available they're finding out that TDP figure isn't entirely truthful.
    Alex1Nbb-15
  • Reply 26 of 98
    Wait... this can’t be... I thought, no, I KNEW, that Apple’s “obsession” with thinness was causing this problem. After all, sooooo many commenters here (less so than other sites), at 9to5, and macrumors said so. /s

    They stated it with such emphatic belief, like it was just an accepted fact. They didn’t wait for more information, they didn’t hesitate, they just repeated the narrative propagated by a few influential pundits. I find it quite annoying that so much nonsense spreads so fast, and those of us who call for cool heads always get accused of being fanboys. No, actually we just like to have all the facts before jumping to a conclusion. 
    smiffy31Alex1Nnetmagelamboaudi4randominternetpersonsteven n.
  • Reply 27 of 98
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    So will people finally calm down now?!?
    williamlondonlamboaudi4randominternetpersonbb-15
  • Reply 28 of 98
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,674member

     ...to just below 100F, which is fine. However, the fans and heat pipes bring it down by 20F ...
    F or C? The article states C.

    Thanks!
  • Reply 29 of 98
    So will people finally calm down now?!?
    No, no and thrice No. Those that love to 'bitch' about things will always find fault.

    I'm sure that many of us have experienced people like that in our lives... They are never satisfied.
    smiffy31lamboaudi4
  • Reply 30 of 98
    jameskatt2jameskatt2 Posts: 720member
    Here is a BEST solution that fixed throttling in addition to Apple's Software Fix: 


    1) Get a spare bottom case cover. This you can modify to improve function. Then return to the original bottom case cover when you need service.

    2) Create strategic holes over the CPU and GPU fans. to further improve airflow. 

    3) Use thermal tape to connect the heat sink to the aluminum bottom case cover. This allows the MacBook Pro’s unibody aluminum case to act like a real heat sink. Currently it does not since it has no contact with the motherboard.

    The author’s MacBook Pro 2012 has been able to run without throttling at all with his mod. And his MacBook Pro has run without a glitch the past six years since he modded it despite frequent trips and n his backpack

    4) Attach fans to the two bottom case holes to push air into the MacBook Pro. This will accelerate cooling, allowing even higher stable frequencies under heavy load.

  • Reply 31 of 98
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,205member
    Here is a BEST solution that fixed throttling in addition to Apple's Software Fix: 


    1) Get a spare bottom case cover. This you can modify to improve function. Then return to the original bottom case cover when you need service.

    2) Create strategic holes over the CPU and GPU fans. to further improve airflow. 

    3) Use thermal tape to connect the heat sink to the aluminum bottom case cover. This allows the MacBook Pro’s unibody aluminum case to act like a real heat sink. Currently it does not since it has no contact with the motherboard.

    The author’s MacBook Pro 2012 has been able to run without throttling at all with his mod. And his MacBook Pro has run without a glitch the past six years since he modded it despite frequent trips and n his backpack

    4) Attach fans to the two bottom case holes to push air into the MacBook Pro. This will accelerate cooling, allowing even higher stable frequencies under heavy load.
    Yeah have fun with that. 
    MisterKitchiaRayz2016williamlondonnetmagerandominternetpersoncgWerksfastasleep
  • Reply 32 of 98
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    Here is a BEST solution that fixed throttling in addition to Apple's Software Fix: 


    1) Get a spare bottom case cover. This you can modify to improve function. Then return to the original bottom case cover when you need service.

    2) Create strategic holes over the CPU and GPU fans. to further improve airflow. 

    3) Use thermal tape to connect the heat sink to the aluminum bottom case cover. This allows the MacBook Pro’s unibody aluminum case to act like a real heat sink. Currently it does not since it has no contact with the motherboard.

    The author’s MacBook Pro 2012 has been able to run without throttling at all with his mod. And his MacBook Pro has run without a glitch the past six years since he modded it despite frequent trips and n his backpack

    4) Attach fans to the two bottom case holes to push air into the MacBook Pro. This will accelerate cooling, allowing even higher stable frequencies under heavy load.


    🤦🏾‍♂️


    lamboaudi4fastasleep
  • Reply 33 of 98
    aknabiaknabi Posts: 211member
    So will people finally calm down now?!?
    No, no and thrice No. Those that love to 'bitch' about things will always find fault.

    I'm sure that many of us have experienced people like that in our lives... They are never satisfied.
    How dare people who pay premiums expecting the best performance possible for a "pro" machine demand what's promised by the brand.

    Those that love to 'bitch fanboy' about things will always never find fault.
    I'm sure that many of us have experienced people like that in our lives... They are never satisfied critical regardless of evidence.
    williamlondoncgWerks
  • Reply 34 of 98
    Here is a BEST solution that fixed throttling in addition to Apple's Software Fix: 


    1) Get a spare bottom case cover. This you can modify to improve function. Then return to the original bottom case cover when you need service.

    2) Create strategic holes over the CPU and GPU fans. to further improve airflow. 

    3) Use thermal tape to connect the heat sink to the aluminum bottom case cover. This allows the MacBook Pro’s unibody aluminum case to act like a real heat sink. Currently it does not since it has no contact with the motherboard.

    The author’s MacBook Pro 2012 has been able to run without throttling at all with his mod. And his MacBook Pro has run without a glitch the past six years since he modded it despite frequent trips and n his backpack

    4) Attach fans to the two bottom case holes to push air into the MacBook Pro. This will accelerate cooling, allowing even higher stable frequencies under heavy load.

    Or place MBP on a towel that is covering 2 small icepacks when rendering....
  • Reply 35 of 98
    Why didn't Apple test rendering videos in Adobe to find this bug before release?
  • Reply 36 of 98
    shevshev Posts: 84member
    brucemc said:
    Sorry, but I don't believe it.  I read on the Internet that Apple's MBP design isn't capable of reaching the target clock speeds, and that is all I need to know.  A YouTube blogger clearly knows more about this than Apple.  No doubt Apple has already silenced him....
    Ha only on this deluded board will you find a guy getting criticised for finding fault with an Apple product, managing to garner enough attention and negative press that the company scrambled to release a fix within a week for an issue that should’ve been spotted before the product was let out the door. So Dave Lee is the ‘bad guy’ in this story for finding fault with his $6700 machine and apple are the good guys for fixing the fault they didn’t spot initially riigghttt?
    avon b7LatkorandominternetpersoncgWerks
  • Reply 37 of 98
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    roake said:
    The digital key issue makes sense, as it would work during testing by the engineering team, but was somehow rendered invalid upon final launch of the hardware.  This does seem to represent a significant quality-control issue, but nothing fatal, as it could easily be fixed by a software update issued a just few days after the computers delivered.
    That's what I was thinking. Disabling checking of signatures is something you would do in dev/test because you're making little changes all the time and you don't want to have to re-sign the code each time. So I find Apple's explanation completely plausible.
  • Reply 38 of 98
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 1,394member
    dewme said: This is another black eye on Apple’s quality process and needs to be fixed immediately. 
    Unfortunately, this is the case. This was a major "oversight" and one that clearly indicates a lack of testing by Apple QC.

    Either that or they knew of the issue, but released anyway, with a desire to remedy post-launch (which would be troubling). 

    But it sounds like they were inexplicably unaware as some rando was able to identify a major issue by simple running. couple tests that represented what a huge portion of Mac customers would be doing on a daily basis.

    This is pretty bad negligence. There is no way around it. Would be great to see this kind of thing improve in the coming year. 

    They are human beings, so mistakes happen. But this one in particular was entirely avoidable.

    And the whole idea of Apple "working with Lee" is really lame. As if they needed his testing to identify the issue. They could just test themselves.

    I have the 2106 MBP 15 fully upgraded. And I love it. No keyboard issues, no nothing. The Touch Bar DID lock up and crash on me a few times when I first bought it - but that was remedied by a patch that came out shortly after I made the purchase. 

    But if you upgrade to the fastest CPU possible and it throttles that severely from doing some work on a very popular app and it go unnoticed by Apple prior to release... I am not feeling the love. 
  • Reply 39 of 98
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,339member
    dewme said: This is another black eye on Apple’s quality process and needs to be fixed immediately. 
    Unfortunately, this is the case. This was a major "oversight" and one that clearly indicates a lack of testing by Apple QC.

    Either that or they knew of the issue, but released anyway, with a desire to remedy post-launch (which would be troubling). 

    But it sounds like they were inexplicably unaware as some rando was able to identify a major issue by simple running. couple tests that represented what a huge portion of Mac customers would be doing on a daily basis.

    This is pretty bad negligence. There is no way around it. Would be great to see this kind of thing improve in the coming year. 

    They are human beings, so mistakes happen. But this one in particular was entirely avoidable.

    And the whole idea of Apple "working with Lee" is really lame. As if they needed his testing to identify the issue. They could just test themselves.

    I have the 2106 MBP 15 fully upgraded. And I love it. No keyboard issues, no nothing. The Touch Bar DID lock up and crash on me a few times when I first bought it - but that was remedied by a patch that came out shortly after I made the purchase. 

    But if you upgrade to the fastest CPU possible and it throttles that severely from doing some work on a very popular app and it go unnoticed by Apple prior to release... I am not feeling the love. 
    Glad they finally fixed the keyboard issue for 2106 :-)  but it was probably some legacy Ive protocol that kept them from fixing it earlier. That, or Ive lives on as a head in a bottle somewhere and finally 'let go' of his obsession for thin.

    Just kidding. You are very right IMO. This one should never have got out the door. Now to really fix those keyboard issues!
  • Reply 40 of 98
    leighrleighr Posts: 237member
    The real question here is why on earth does Premiere Pro take 8 times longer to render the same 5 minute video?
    sennen
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