Apple's UIKit, Xcode among the top 20 fastest growing, in demand skills

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in macOS
Freelancer site Upwork published a listing of the top twenty fastest growing skills of the more than 5,000 it tracks. The list cited Apple's iOS development framework UIKit and its Xcode development tools, both of which took center stage at the company's Worldwide Developer Conference this summer.

Mojave's News app is built using UIKit
Mojave's News app is built using UIKit, but looks and works like other Mac titles. You can dismiss the sidebar to focus on a single, uncluttered view of an article


Upworks regularly publishes a listing of popular skill sets by their percentage of growth, which highlights those currently garnering attention. Across the last year, it noted growing attention for Swift development, for example, along with Augmented Reality and specific competency in Final Cut Pro, as well as general interest in deep and machine learning.

The firm's latest list shines a spotlight on UIKit, the framework that has been used to create iOS apps over the last decade. What's new this year is that Apple announced efforts at WWDC to bring a series of its own UIKit apps to the Mac in macOS Mojave. It also outlined plans to enhance its UIKit frameworks to enable third party developers to bring their iOS apps to the Mac App Store.

Currently, Mojave features four apps created with UIKit that work on the Mac desktop: Apple News (pictured above), Stocks, Home and Voice Memos. During the beta, the company is working through transition issues and optimizations. Next year, third party UIKit developers should have tested tools for adapting their existing apps to work on Macs.

Beyond UIKit, the new Xcode 10 for iOS 12 and macOS 14 Mojave also provides a series of enhancements that include support for Dark Mode, new editor enhancements (including multiple cursors for making parallel code edits), CreateML and Playgrounds built for Machine Learning, new tools for debugging and testing, and a series of performance optimizations.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    Too bad Apple is such a vanilla company with no personality. These poor folks are going to waste their time learning a skill on such a doomed platform. /s

    edited July 2018 Rayz2016
  • Reply 2 of 7
    IreneWIreneW Posts: 175member
    The complete list looks like this:

    1. Blockchain
    2. Google Cloud Platform
    3. Volusion
    4. Risk management
    5. Product photography
    6. Rapid prototyping
    7. Google App Engine API
    8. SCORM
    9. GitLab
    10. Go development
    11. Apple UIKit
    12. Enterprise architecture
    13. Tensorflow
    14. Atlassian Confluence
    15. Apple Xcode
    16. eLearning
    17. Customer retention
    18. Articulate storyline
    19. Node.js
    20. Scala development
    Such a convoluted and mixed bag of skills that it is really hard to take seriously, if you ask me. 70 percent of fastest-growing skills are new to the index, which they claim underscores rapid evolution of skills. I'd say it is a sign of a bad methology.
    rezwitsSpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 7
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,755member
    I don't think it's necessarily a demand for Xcode developers, but a demand for GOOD Xcode developers.  Lets face it, like anything else, you open the floodgates to let anyone and their uncle in, and the pool just gets diluted.  
  • Reply 4 of 7
    Has anyone here ever used Upwork? I have browsed it a few times for projects related to photonics and quantum optics. It amazes me how low the budgets for many technically complex projects are. The job posters seem to want you to design something special for them for the same amount of money you could make in a couple of hours in a normal job.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,790member
    IreneW said:
    The complete list looks like this:

    1. Blockchain
    2. Google Cloud Platform
    3. Volusion
    4. Risk management
    5. Product photography
    6. Rapid prototyping
    7. Google App Engine API
    8. SCORM
    9. GitLab
    10. Go development
    11. Apple UIKit
    12. Enterprise architecture
    13. Tensorflow
    14. Atlassian Confluence
    15. Apple Xcode
    16. eLearning
    17. Customer retention
    18. Articulate storyline
    19. Node.js
    20. Scala development
    Such a convoluted and mixed bag of skills that it is really hard to take seriously, if you ask me. 70 percent of fastest-growing skills are new to the index, which they claim underscores rapid evolution of skills. I'd say it is a sign of a bad methology.
    Mmm. 

    You’re right. This is junk. 

  • Reply 6 of 7
    HyperealityHypereality Posts: 44unconfirmed, member
    Has anyone here ever used Upwork? I have browsed it a few times for projects related to photonics and quantum optics. It amazes me how low the budgets for many technically complex projects are. The job posters seem to want you to design something special for them for the same amount of money you could make in a couple of hours in a normal job.
    Yep, I've hired a couple of developers from there,  not lowballing but their rates are lower than I'd get in my own country.  They were both good. One I'd hire permanently.  As my projects were put at a sensible price so I could get good developers.  You can require that no agencies apply (as they are the worst lowballs trying to bodyshop god knows what kind of people to you),  but the bug*ers still apply and you have to filter them out. 

    I'm not sure I'd offer my services on there though.   Most users seem focused on low prices and that means I wouldn't get work through it, my own work comes via personal recommendation, networking is still the best option. 

    The better route seems to be Toptal, but there I'm not sure if it works out because of the effort to get listed by them (as a provider I mean) and then from a hiring perspective the rates and T&C's are not so attractive as getting someone through networking or recommendation.


  • Reply 7 of 7
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 554member
    sflocal said:
    I don't think it's necessarily a demand for Xcode developers, but a demand for GOOD Xcode developers.  Lets face it, like anything else, you open the floodgates to let anyone and their uncle in, and the pool just gets diluted.  

    Having come from a top software engineering university myself I’ve observed first hand the wide range of software talent out there and I can vouch for Jobs’ statement below.

    Steve Jobs:  “Now, in software, and it used to be the case in hardware, the difference between the average software developer and the best is 50:1; Maybe even 100:1. Very few things in life are like this, but what I was lucky enough to spend my life doing, which is software, is like this. So I’ve built a lot of my success on finding these truly gifted people, and not settling for ‘B’ and ‘C’ players, but really going for the ‘A’ players. And I found something… I found that when you get enough ‘A’ players together; when you go through the incredible work to find these ‘A’ players, they really like working with each other. Because most have never had the chance to do that before. And they don’t work with ‘B’ and ‘C’ players, so its self policing. They only want to hire ‘A’ players. So you build these pockets of ‘A’ players and it just propagates.”

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