McDonald's in Chicago is the latest Apple Store copycat - but not the first by far

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 51
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,684member
    cpsro said:
    Oh, yes, we really can pin the blame on the food industry, along with a complicit government. 
    Personally I have very healthy eating habits. My blood pressure, weight, cholesterol and blood sugar all smack dab in the middle of normal. I almost never eat processed foods. I walk about a mile to the market nearly everyday and buy fresh produce and fish. I also grow a lot of things in my back yard including avocados, limes, oranges, plums, as well as vegetables and herbs. The key to a healthy diet, as with everything else, is moderation. Obese people usually consume quite a few thousand more calories than they burn off each day. That is a decision that they make for themselves, but they are often in denial about their obesity with excuses like hormone imbalance or genetics. Both usually false. Eating smaller portions, more vegetables and getting more exercise is the way to go in my opinion.

    You can't expect the US government to ban foods for lack of nutrition. They can regulate which foods are served in the cafeteria at public schools but that is about it. You're not likely to get lawmakers to declare sugar, carbohydrates and alcohol are poisons. In the US at least, people have the right to eat whatever they want, if they can afford it. 

    I always fly first class and I never see any obese people up there, but I pity the person who has to sit next to an obese person in coach. The airlines should make them buy two seats rather than let their blubber overflow onto another passenger.
    StrangeDayskingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 22 of 51
    kestralkestral Posts: 200member
    But McDonald’s had the Mac first.
    Right now between McDonald's and Apple, only one of them has an up-to-date Big Mac.
    edited August 10
  • Reply 23 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,534member
    Interesting but it will NOT solve McDonalds problems.    They have seeming forgotten what started the business in the first place.   That was quality food fast.  

    These days the quality of the food suck.  I made the mistake of buying a burger at a Mc Donalds about a month ago, it was terrible.   Greasy as hell and frankly didn't even taste like ground beef.   Beyond that the service is just extremely bad at most Mc Donalds these days.   Every time I hear about some guy reaching across tho counter to beat the living hell out of the person behind the counter I in a way understand.   A business is pretty clueless if they think putting complete idiots at the cash register is a good thing (Tim Hortons has this problem too).

    So in a nut shell unless they bring up food quality to the point it was in the 1970's and do something about the people working in these establishments they will continue to suffer.    No amount of fancy facilities will fix the problem.

    One thing that Mc Donalds is trying to do is to get people to accept crap food and the new good.   They actually are advertising their new buggers as juicy.   What they are is fat with a bit of meat in them.   I really hope that they fail, I'm just tired of seeing old respectable businesses run into the ground by management that can't think past the next quarter.
  • Reply 24 of 51
    ITT in Chicago has another ripoff of the minimalist architecture style.


    claire1DavidJHupp
  • Reply 25 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,534member
    Soli said:
    But McDonald’s had the Mac first.
    It’s a “towering” sandwich called the Big Mac, and it’s still highly configurable. :smiley: 
    More configurable than the current Mac Pro.   Very serviceable too, when the ""cooks"" forget to delete the pickles you can do it yourself.
  • Reply 26 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,534member
    volcan said:
    cpsro said:
    Oh, yes, we really can pin the blame on the food industry, along with a complicit government. 
    Personally I have very healthy eating habits. My blood pressure, weight, cholesterol and blood sugar all smack dab in the middle of normal. I almost never eat processed foods. I walk about a mile to the market nearly everyday and buy fresh produce and fish. I also grow a lot of things in my back yard including avocados, limes, oranges, plums, as well as vegetables and herbs. The key to a healthy diet, as with everything else, is moderation. Obese people usually consume quite a few thousand more calories than they burn off each day. That is a decision that they make for themselves, but they are often in denial about their obesity with excuses like hormone imbalance or genetics. Both usually false. Eating smaller portions, more vegetables and getting more exercise is the way to go in my opinion.

    You can't expect the US government to ban foods for lack of nutrition. They can regulate which foods are served in the cafeteria at public schools but that is about it. You're not likely to get lawmakers to declare sugar, carbohydrates and alcohol are poisons. In the US at least, people have the right to eat whatever they want, if they can afford it. 

    I always fly first class and I never see any obese people up there, but I pity the person who has to sit next to an obese person in coach. The airlines should make them buy two seats rather than let their blubber overflow onto another passenger.
    ""but they are often in denial about their obesity with excuses like hormone imbalance or genetics.""

    Actually genetics is a big factor with regard to some types of obesity, it is pretty ignorant to suggest otherwise.   Likewise medication prescribed to an individual can be a huge factor.   I'd be the first to admit that a good portion of the population is on the pathway to obesity of their own free will, but it is really dick behavior to say that there is no genetic factor here or that causes out of a persons control are not an issue.
  • Reply 27 of 51
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,268member
    grifmx said:
    hahaha - would be interesting to know how much all these different designers and copycat designers got paid! when everything looks like an Apple Store, then Apple will have to do something different yet again

    Apple is always iterating its designs. Just look back at the original Apple Store design to see how much they have changed! I personally think the earlier designs were more focused on people and less on services or sales pitches.

    Can people sit and try out the computers in today's Apple Stores?


    edited August 10 anantksundaram
  • Reply 28 of 51
    designrdesignr Posts: 352member
    flippysch said:
    ITT in Chicago has another ripoff of the minimalist architecture style.



    :-)

  • Reply 29 of 51
    The original Apple Store designer, Ron Johnson, left Apple and was hired by J.C. Penny then proceeded to completely run the company into the ground by applying Apple boutique concepts to a retailer whose customers relied on coupons, sales & discounts. Have to careful about copying another brands ideas.  Amazon started out as a bookstore then evolved into a retailer and beat Sears at a game Sears invented and mastered in 1893!  Sears made a heck of a lot of terrible mistakes, perhaps the biggest was to buy failing KMart and the second biggest was not to get back into an online catalog with already a strong storefront footprint.  
  • Reply 30 of 51
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 1,825member
    Well now we know what a Apple store looks like if they were a fast food store.

  • Reply 31 of 51
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    jbdragon said:
    Well now we know what a Apple store looks like if they were a fast food store.
    Sometimes I feel like a great chef who has devoted his entire life to monastic study of the art of cooking. I gathered the finest ingredients and built the most advanced kitchen and prepared the most exquisite meal–so perfect, so delicious, so extraordinary; more astounding than any meal ever created. Yet each day I stand in my window and watch 97% percent of the world walk past my restaurant into the McDonald’s across the street. – Fake Steve Jobs
    gatorguy
  • Reply 32 of 51
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,684member
     but it is really dick behavior to say that there is no genetic factor here or that causes out of a persons control are not an issue.
    Perfectly explains how starving populations of humans or other species exhibit  examples of obesity even when exposed to prolonged deprivation of nutrition. Not ever!

    if medication is causing obesity I’d suggest stop taking the medication.
    tallest skilStrangeDays
  • Reply 33 of 51
    claire1claire1 Posts: 350unconfirmed, member
    nytesky said:
    1. This is a modernist aesthetic that exposes structural elements, something referred to as structural honesty. Apple does not employee this type of aesthetic. 
    2. All glass systems were around decades before Apple started using them. This particular McDonald's uses a structural mullion system for the glass, something Apple has not done for a long time since they first went to a structural glass system in New York City at the Cube. 
    3. No one would mistake this interior for Apple.
    It is quite a stretch to say that this McDonald's is copying their aesthetic of Apple Stores. 
    Ah the typical "Apple created nothing and this was the natural way forward for the industry" reply.
    Just like with iPhone, iPod, iPad, App Store, ApplePay etc. etc. etc.
  • Reply 34 of 51
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,314member
    cpsro said:
    volcan said:
    cpsro said:
    There really is no way to gloss over the fact that the Standard American Diet (SAD) is a root cause of nearly half of U.S. healthcare costs. Just as cigarets should cost $25/pack to cover the associated healthcare burden, a Big Mac should cost $25 a pop, too. Slow poison is what McDonald's sells.
    You really can't blame American fast food chains for the poor dietary choices Americans make. There is nothing particularly unhealthy about a Big Mac. The problem starts when a person eats three per day, everyday, along with sodas and fries. If you only ate one McDonald's meal a week and the rest of the time fresh fruits and vegetables, you'd be fine. Obesity, is for the most part, a personal choice.

    As far as cigarette usage is concerned, America is much lower than Eastern Europe and Russia. Nicotine is a difficult addiction to break but at least in the US there are programs that work, so again it is a personal choice. As long as you are talking about unhealthy habits, I would rank alcohol use right up there with the others and the worst countries are again Eastern Europe and Russia.
    Oh, yes, we really can pin the blame on the food industry, along with a complicit government. There is a lot that's unhealthy about a Big Mac. The Big Mac would not be at all popular if its sauce lacked sugar and there was no ketchup to add. The bun is fiberless, nutrition-less junk calories. Take note that sugar is a key ingredient in almost every item on Starbucks' menu and has been added to 3/4ths of the items on shelves in a typical grocery store. Sugar is highly addictive, non-essential, and not satisfying for more than an instant. Should one blame the addict or the pusher? I blame the pusher. Just 10 superfluous calories consumed per day (1 Big Mac every 2 months) adds up to 1 pound of weight gained per year in the form of fat. Our over consumption of sugar and other fiberless carbohydrates are the cause of a plethora of diseases and conditions.  But products based on sugar and carbs are very stable for long-term storage, which permits the food industry to ship and store products world-wide, spreading disease and death along with their commerce (nice tax revenue for governments).

    Yup, alcohol is a carbohydrate, too, in the same class of slow poisons as table sugar and corn syrup and even fruit juice. Even moderate drinking is unhealthy.

    Sure, sugar consumption is a choice, but just try to cut out sugar. It takes tremendous willpower in the face of widespread prevalence of sugary products, flashy advertising, and a populace that is all just as hooked as you are and will look at you like you're crazy when there's so much fun to be had by consuming sugar in so many creative ways.  There's a reason obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, fatty liver disease, possibly dementia (type 3 diabetes?), etc. have risen dramatically since fat was demonized in the '70s. Due to "evidence" promoted by the sugar industry, sugar and other carbs replaced much of the fat in our diet. But people don't know how to properly regulate their sugar intake, and sugar causes more health problems than fat.

    Knowledge is power.
    Sorry, I still disagree.   Yes, McDonald's is terrible food and I personally do not eat chain fast food and I also no longer drink juice or soda.  But in the end, you don't have to eat in McDonald's to eat high-carb food.    Orange juice has just as many carbs as soda.   As you state yourself, most of the foods in  a grocery store have added sugar.    And one can go to a fancy restaurant and eat  food that is aesthetically better and somewhat fresher, but still has as many calories, fat and carbs and it may be even worse for you because the portions are larger.   Eating is a personal choice.  As someone else posted, if you have fast food occasionally,  you'll be fine.   If you have it everyday or if you go to a $200 steakhouse every day, you probably won't be.   
    marklark
  • Reply 35 of 51
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,296member
    How about you spend some money training your employees to say “thank you” and “you’re welcome” and to remember to put napkins in the bag and not look at me like I asked for their first born when I ask for ketchup? Maybe that would be a good place to start.
    edited August 11
  • Reply 36 of 51
    aknabiaknabi Posts: 116member
    Soli said:
    But McDonald’s had the Mac first.
    It’s a “towering” sandwich called the Big Mac, and it’s still highly configurable. :smiley: 
    Yeah and it will throttle your heart, severely reducing performance
  • Reply 37 of 51
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,607member
    Copycat design is kind of the norm in the building industry, both at the commercial and residential level. That's what trendy is all about. I bet you didn't realize you needed a barn door in your house. Now every major homebuilder has multiple plans that each incorporate barn doors, often multiple of them in a full-on barndoorgasm. 

    At least the end result of copying Apple's building aesthetic is a general improvement in the outward appearance of several retailers. I don't miss driving by the old bright yellow and red (Hot Dog Theme from Windows 3.0) McDonalds buildings. This may be a bad marketing move for McDonalds because very young children probably imprint more readily on the garish themes that McDonalds used to employ. Now these brain altered kiddies are going to want a Happy Meal (yeah, kind of an ironic name when all things are considered...) when mom or dad drives by an Apple store. 
  • Reply 38 of 51
    cpsro said:
    Slow poison is what McDonald's sells.
    I am sure those who can less afford a filet mignon and farmers’ markets have taken your deep concerns for them under advisement. 


    marklark
  • Reply 39 of 51

    But McDonald’s had the Mac first.
    Not just a Mac, but the Big one!
  • Reply 40 of 51
    grifmx said:
    hahaha - would be interesting to know how much all these different designers and copycat designers got paid! when everything looks like an Apple Store, then Apple will have to do something different yet again

    Apple is always iterating its designs. Just look back at the original Apple Store design to see how much they have changed! I personally think the earlier designs were more focused on people and less on services or sales pitches.

    Can people sit and try out the computers in today's Apple Stores?


    Excellent point. That was the era of “I am Mac...” ads, when Apple was still trying hard to gain ‘mind’space. There is less of a need to do so now, but things are definitely not interactive anymore as they used to be. 

    In fact, I find most Apple stores to be too crowded, with officious (albeit helpful) staff, and basically places that you walk into, get what you want, and get out of quickly. Definitely not places to linger. 
    philboogie
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