Verizon 5G Home internet service goes live with free Apple TV offer

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in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
Verizon has launched its 5G Home Internet service in four cities, competing against normal home broadband with a cellular-based version boasting connection speeds of up to 300Mbps, with an Apple TV 4K offered to tempt customers to sign up to the service.




As previously announced by the carrier, Verizon's 5G Home service has gone live in four markets, with limited areas of Sacramento and Los Angeles, CA; Houston, TX; and Indianapolis, IN. able to sign up for in the initial rollout.

Verizon is offering three months for free, then the service will cost $50 per month for existing Verizon subscribers, $70 for everyone else.

Running on Verizon's "proprietary 5G standard," 5G Home is similar to a typical home broadband service, with Internet access provided via a single router, albeit one that uses the carrier's cellular network instead of a physical connection. Speeds of around 300 megabits per second are touted, rising to nearly gigabit speeds in some areas, seemingly with no data caps.

To sweeten the deal for early adopters, customers can request either a free Apple TV 4K or Chromecast Ultra, provided at the time of installation, as well as three free months of YouTube TV access. Those signing up are also to receive "white glove installation" of the service, a 24-hour concierge line, access to the first wave of 5G-capable mobile devices when they become available, and free hardware upgrades when they become available in the first year.

The latter point is likely to be very beneficial to customers, as Verizon is using its own version of 5G for the service, rather than an industry standard variant. As the iteration used will only communicate with specialized devices, in this case 5G Home routers, when the company migrates to standard 3GPP 5G NR technology for future installations in new areas, hardware upgrades are likely to be offered to the earlier customers.

The rollout of the service will also help Verizon in expanding its 5G network in general, which will provide high-speed connectivity for future smartphones and other mobile devices. While Verizon does claim the title as the first of the U.S. operators to produce a commercial 5G network with their 5G Home product, it is likely that subscribers will have to wait until 2019 before they can receive the same speed benefits from their smartphones.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,100member
    In my mind the term "proprietary standard" is an oxymoron. If it's proprietary who cares if the company that is controlling the technology considers it their own internal standard? Secret sausage stuffing is still just sausage stuffing. Nobody other than the company stuffing the sausage has any idea about what goes into it. To add insult to injury throwing "5G" in the recipe further obfuscates the whole deal. If their customers think they are somehow "future proofing" their current investments by buying into a "proprietary 5G standard" that sounds a lot like a real standard, they are in for a rude awakening down the road. Proprietary means closed, proprietary means captive, and proprietary means paying again later to overcome the limitations of the dead-end proprietary technology. These things usually end with a "pay me now" and "pay me later." I'm willing to wait and only pay later.   
    ronnSpamSandwichMuntzderekcurrie
  • Reply 2 of 20
    While I'm wary of the "proprietary" business, too, I think I may be envious of Indianapolis residents for the first time in my life.
    redgeminipaMuntzderekcurrie
  • Reply 3 of 20
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,366member
    This has a lot of promise. I'm a little unclear on the details though. This is essentially a cell based modem that plugs into a router, right? Or is the supplied device both a cell link and a wifi router? I'd kind of line to see it as a modem only kind of thing I can plug into an existing network of airports (or future wifi routers.)
  • Reply 4 of 20
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    I like it. I have no cable at my vacation home, here in California, just Verizon cellular. I get about three bars and that is adequate for my needs. I have OTA TV which is fine since we get like a hundred channels from LA. Faster speed would be good for Apple TV (and Amazon Fire) content. in my other home in Central America I have Apple TV and Amazon running on Safer VPN so the family can watch stateside movies. Personally I don't watch much TV.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,789member
    eightzero said:
    Or is the supplied device both a cell link and a wifi router? 
    Probably but most wifi routers include an ethernet switch with four or five ports.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    monsignor_bloviatemonsignor_bloviate Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    This is a cellular company offering service. Unreliable and overpriced are the watchwords.
    jbdragonronn
  • Reply 7 of 20
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,138member
    This is a cellular company offering service. Unreliable and overpriced are the watchwords.
    If it’s competition to Comcast, great.  Maybe they’ll lower prices and/or stop with the dumb CAPS.

    seanismorrisMplsPredgeminipaderekcurrie
  • Reply 8 of 20
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 452member
    Here out in the boondocks of the Sonoran desert high speed cable internet is nowhere to be found.  We’re lucky just to have basic telephone lines, as if we still needed a land line in this day and age.  Instead we live with an underwhelming satellite broadband experience that, if we’re lucky and it’s the right time of the day, will provide low res Netflix without stuttering.

    Bring on 5G!!!

    (Yea, I know.  We’ll probably be waiting years for that too...)
    redgeminipa
  • Reply 9 of 20
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,366member
    volcan said:
    eightzero said:
    Or is the supplied device both a cell link and a wifi router? 
    Probably but most wifi routers include an ethernet switch with four or five ports.
    Kewl. So you could connect it up to another base station, maybe even one that operates a VPN?
  • Reply 10 of 20
    claire1claire1 Posts: 510unconfirmed, member
    Love the Apple TV bait these companies use. Shows how awesome Apple TV is.
    Muntzderekcurrie
  • Reply 11 of 20
    KskreiderKskreider Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    We live on the east side of Sacramento and while 5G isn't available yet Comcast had fiber to our house within three days of Verizon announcing 5G.  
    ronnderekcurrie
  • Reply 12 of 20
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,458member
    Kskreider said:
    We live on the east side of Sacramento and while 5G isn't available yet Comcast had fiber to our house within three days of Verizon announcing 5G.  
    Funny what a little competition can do. I really don't give a rip about 5G on my iPhone; LTE is plenty fast enough for me. Breaking the Comcast monopoly is where 5G will really matter. 

    I live in a new neighborhood - all the houses and utilities are less than 10 years old and all of the utilities were installed when the houses were installed. our only option for broadband is Comcast. I have no idea why they didn't bother to put the infrastructure in when they installed the lines for their phone service, but for whatever reason we're dealing with a Comcast monopoly.
  • Reply 13 of 20
     My son’s like to game.  Will this be a good option for gamers or not? I am trying to If I should replace our current provider.  
  • Reply 14 of 20
    Considering I pay my cable company $85 per month for 120 Mbps service now, I'll jump on this if/when it ever comes to my area. 
  • Reply 15 of 20
    dewme said:
    In my mind the term "proprietary standard" is an oxymoron. If it's proprietary who cares if the company that is controlling the technology considers it their own internal standard? Secret sausage stuffing is still just sausage stuffing. Nobody other than the company stuffing the sausage has any idea about what goes into it. To add insult to injury throwing "5G" in the recipe further obfuscates the whole deal. If their customers think they are somehow "future proofing" their current investments by buying into a "proprietary 5G standard" that sounds a lot like a real standard, they are in for a rude awakening down the road. Proprietary means closed, proprietary means captive, and proprietary means paying again later to overcome the limitations of the dead-end proprietary technology. These things usually end with a "pay me now" and "pay me later." I'm willing to wait and only pay later.   
    I guess you missed the part that says Verizon will upgrade to new equipment for no charge when the standard it's using changes... 
  • Reply 16 of 20
    REAL 5G is now a necessary term. Verizon's "proprietary 5G standard" only qualifies as 4G in bandwidth. REAL 5G will not be proprietary.

    Here's where you can keep up with news about REAL 5G:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5G
    https://www.sdxcentral.com/5g/definitions/5g-standards/
    https://www.sdxcentral.com/5g/definitions/imt-2020/

    When it's available, which it currently is not, REAL 5G will have maximum download bandwidth of up to 20,000 megabits per second, versus Verizon's '5G' bandwidth of 300 to ~1,000 megabits per second. Obviously, that's a profound difference. The maximum upload bandwidth of REAL 5G will be 10,000 megabits per second.

    Question: Will hardware capable of running Verizon's "5G" be able to run REAL 5G.
    Answer: No. REAL 5G continues to evolve. There is only hardware available is for testing purposes.

    Conclusion: It's a marketing game. This isn't about science. It isn't about actual technology standards. Whether we want to play this marketing game is up to each of us. But Verizon's 'proprietary 5G standard' is not REAL 5G. We are likely to see REAL 5G starting to be available in hardware and services in maybe 2019, probably 2020.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,201member
    JWSC said:
    Here out in the boondocks of the Sonoran desert high speed cable internet is nowhere to be found.  We’re lucky just to have basic telephone lines, as if we still needed a land line in this day and age.  Instead we live with an underwhelming satellite broadband experience that, if we’re lucky and it’s the right time of the day, will provide low res Netflix without stuttering.

    Bring on 5G!!!

    (Yea, I know.  We’ll probably be waiting years for that too...)
    You’ll probably see Elon Musk’s new high-speed Internet via satellite service first.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/how-spacex-brings-starlink-broadband-satellite-internet-to-low-earth-orbit/
  • Reply 18 of 20
     What’s this a new fast and cost competiitive internet service, how did this happen when net neutrality was revoked?  Oh yeah maybe net neutrality actually harmed competition and a free and open internet, as it always was, is still the best solution.  Let the 5G competition begin and we will all win. 
  • Reply 19 of 20
     What’s this a new fast and cost competiitive internet service, how did this happen when net neutrality was revoked?  Oh yeah maybe net neutrality actually harmed competition and a free and open internet, as it always was, is still the best solution.  Let the 5G competition begin and we will all win. 
    (0_o) Huh? What ISP do you work for? The last thing these companies want is real competition. And no, this isn't REAL 5G. It's merely a variation on REAL 4G, the non-proprietary standard for which was finished in 2013, five years ago. Kind of sad actually.

    Where I live, Verizon and what was Time Warner Cable entered into an illegal, under-the-table non-compete agreement. If you live in a zone with Time Warner Cable (temporarily under the name of 'Spectrum' until Charter is booted out of New York this month), it's impossible to get Verizon FIOS to connect to your house. So much for competition benefitting my community. :-P These companies are disgusting, having destroyed the integrity of the FCC, run by proven liar Ajit Pai. This is corporatocracy. This is idiocracy.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    REAL 5G is now a necessary term. Verizon's "proprietary 5G standard" only qualifies as 4G in bandwidth. REAL 5G will not be proprietary.

    Here's where you can keep up with news about REAL 5G:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5G
    https://www.sdxcentral.com/5g/definitions/5g-standards/
    https://www.sdxcentral.com/5g/definitions/imt-2020/

    When it's available, which it currently is not, REAL 5G will have maximum download bandwidth of up to 20,000 megabits per second, versus Verizon's '5G' bandwidth of 300 to ~1,000 megabits per second. Obviously, that's a profound difference. The maximum upload bandwidth of REAL 5G will be 10,000 megabits per second.

    Question: Will hardware capable of running Verizon's "5G" be able to run REAL 5G.
    Answer: No. REAL 5G continues to evolve. There is only hardware available is for testing purposes.

    Conclusion: It's a marketing game. This isn't about science. It isn't about actual technology standards. Whether we want to play this marketing game is up to each of us. But Verizon's 'proprietary 5G standard' is not REAL 5G. We are likely to see REAL 5G starting to be available in hardware and services in maybe 2019, probably 2020.
    A lot of people brought this up when 4G came out. Of course it’s marketing. No, no one saw the speed set by the standards, BUT, it was a hell of a lot better than 3G. 
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