New MacBook Air threatens both MacBook and MacBook Pro with Function Keys

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 56
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,876member
    scartart said:
    The new MBA has such a weak CPU compared to the nTB Pro that I don't see it taking too many sales away.
    Wait for the benchmarks. The 1.6 GHz vs 2.3 GHz clock difference may be already offset by 7 W vs 15 W TDP difference. 8th gen. vs 7th gen. difference may not be such easily ignored.

    There is also the T2 chip. With its lack of T2 security features nTB Pro is not suited to mission critical applications/jobs.
    Benchmark/passmark of new 13" 2018 Macbook Air vs 13" 2018 Macbook Pro will be depressing as the new Macbook Air will show severely under-powered to even consider replacing equivalent Function Keys Macbook Pro.
  • Reply 22 of 56
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 827member
    I'm surprised Apple didn't keep the old Air and bump the price up $100, like they bumped the 2015 MBP by $200 when they introduced the 2017 MBP.
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 23 of 56
    CSpace6CSpace6 Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    Does anyone else see the next MacBook refresh re-positioning itself as the entry-level model within the notebook Mac lineup? I'm surprised they didn't drop the price of the current MacBook to $999, but Apple may be waiting to make changes to that machine for the time being as to not cannibalize sales of the newly released MacBook Air. Give it until next year, my guess is the second-generation MacBook Air will be out the door and the MacBook will likely either follow suit or re-position itself as the entry-level Mac.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 24 of 56
    CSpace6CSpace6 Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    CSpace6 said:
    Does anyone else see the next MacBook refresh re-positioning itself as the entry-level model within the notebook Mac lineup? I'm surprised they didn't drop the price of the current MacBook to $999, but Apple may be waiting to make changes to that machine for the time being as to not cannibalize sales of the newly released MacBook Air. Give it until next year, my guess is the second-generation MacBook Air will be out the door and the MacBook will likely either follow suit or re-position itself as the entry-level Mac.
    I’m hoping the MacBook is the model they use to introduce an ARM Mac.
    I could see that happening, albeit I cannot say for sure that I see Apple going there before the end of the decade. Though, they've got a little over a year to do it, so we'll see. But I definitely see that happening in the near-future.
  • Reply 25 of 56
    The new Air and the current non-Touchbar Pro run at 3.6 GHz in turboboost.  They have the same speed and type of memory.  If they are plugged in and tested in an air conditioned room, most benchmarks you see will have their CPU performance almost equal.  Hopefully someone will do a thorough test that includes unplugged benchmarks, but don't expect to see that in geekbench or most other reviews.
  • Reply 26 of 56
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,622member
    The rMB is a failure of a product for Apple.  I think I have only ever seen one outside an Apple Store. Just too expensive for a machine crippled with one port, and could not compete with the MBA, even though the screen was so much better in the rMB.  

    I can can see the rMB repositioned with an A series chip. Would it run Mac OS, and how to price between MBA and iPad Pro?

    Thing is, Apple’s laptop strategy has become quite confused. I suspect because at a very high level in Apple some executive reckons ipads will replace them, without first giving iPads the functionality of a laptop. Look at the introduction of the USB C port on the new iPad Pro: why no expansion of peripheral support, full file management etc? It like the hardware feature was added, and then just left there hanging with no cooll software features to take advantage of it. The Apple of ten years ago wouldn’t have done that.
    edited October 2018 likethesky
  • Reply 27 of 56
    The new MBA is essentially a 12” MB with a 13” display, an extra port, a more current & faster processor, and a fingerprint reader.  And the Air branding.  

    It will cannibalize sales of the 12” MB.

    I hope Apple keeps the 12” in the lineup, but with a lower price and a spec bump.  It is a nice option for people who travel a lot and need extreme portability.  
    mpw_amherstrandominternetpersontht
  • Reply 28 of 56
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,345administrator
    entropys said:
    The rMB is a failure of a product for Apple.  I think I have only ever seen one outside an Apple Store. Just too expensive for a machine crippled with one port, and could not compete with the MBA, even though the screen was so much better in the rMB.  

    I can can see the rMB repositioned with an A series chip. Would it run Mac OS, and how to price between MBA and iPad Pro?

    Thing is, Apple’s laptop strategy has become quite confused. I suspect because at a very high level in Apple some executive reckons ipads will replace them, without first giving iPads the functionality of a laptop. Look at the introduction of the USB C port on the new iPad Pro: why no expansion of peripheral support, full file management etc? It like the hardware feature was added, and then just left there hanging with no cooll software features to take advantage of it. The Apple of ten years ago wouldn’t have done that.
    This may vary by region. I see more Retina MacBooks than any other Mac portable in my travels.
    urashidliketheskyaknabi
  • Reply 29 of 56
    xgmanxgman Posts: 150member
    endangered? Who cares.. Its a sale to Apple either way. More choices for the customer.
    edited October 2018 randominternetperson
  • Reply 30 of 56
    Personally, I think the 12" MacBook should become the new entry level one.  Start it at 128GB if you must for SSD, but smaller screen, fewer ports, slower processor and no Touch ID seems to make it a prime candidate to take over the sub $1000 slot once the only MBA goes away.  They could even just offer it in one color to make it cheaper to make.  Ideally, I'd like to see the 12" MacBook come in at $899.  Then the MBA at $1099 if they're going to insist on 128GB SSDs for the base model, or keep it at $1199 and start with 256GB SSDs.  Ditch the lowest end MBP without TouchBar and maybe keep the step up one that's $1499, and then of course keep the rest of the MBP line up above that.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 31 of 56
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,687member
    Personally, I think the 12" MacBook should become the new entry level one.  Start it at 128GB if you must for SSD, but smaller screen, fewer ports, slower processor and no Touch ID seems to make it a prime candidate to take over the sub $1000 slot once the only MBA goes away.  They could even just offer it in one color to make it cheaper to make.  Ideally, I'd like to see the 12" MacBook come in at $899.  Then the MBA at $1099 if they're going to insist on 128GB SSDs for the base model, or keep it at $1199 and start with 256GB SSDs.  Ditch the lowest end MBP without TouchBar and maybe keep the step up one that's $1499, and then of course keep the rest of the MBP line up above that.
    I can see it becoming the new low-entry (with ARM), but I'd hope that it comes with Touch ID (and eventually Face ID after the higher-end Macs get it). I think Apple is going to keep pushing their T-series chip on their Macs.
  • Reply 32 of 56
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,147member
    Help push up AAPL and buy one of each will ya!  ;)
  • Reply 33 of 56
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,027member
    Kinda thinking the opposite, if the 13" function keys Pro gets an update soon it'll be the one making the Air look awkward. The Air has no P3 display, 500 nits display, Iris Plus, and is a class below on processors (albeit with a fan), the Pro is a better machine for not that much more. nTB just needs T2 and Butterfly 3 to already be ahead on just about everything, if they put a quad core in 15W that would be the icing on top. 


    It's the 12" that definitely looks to be on death row. 100 dollars more for doing much less, all for 0.75 pounds. 
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 34 of 56
    It seems like a lot of commenters here think 12" MacBook should be cheaper because they give more importance to specs, computing power, expansion options, etc.

    But there is another category of people who choose MB because it is smaller, lighter, cooler, quieter, and frankly, "cuter."  They actually prefer a computer that is less computer-y and more a work of art.  And they don't mind paying more for that.

    As Andy Rooney once said, "It has recently come to my attention that when you don't want something in something, it costs extra." :)
    dewmemacplusplusrandominternetperson
  • Reply 35 of 56
    urashid said:
    It seems like a lot of commenters here think 12" MacBook should be cheaper because they give more importance to specs, computing power, expansion options, etc.

    But there is another category of people who choose MB because it is smaller, lighter, cooler, quieter, and frankly, "cuter."  They actually prefer a computer that is less computer-y and more a work of art.  And they don't mind paying more for that.

    As Andy Rooney once said, "It has recently come to my attention that when you don't want something in something, it costs extra." :)
    You mean like a gold Apple Watch Edition?  :)
  • Reply 36 of 56
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,277member
    tipoo said:
    The 12" particularly seems on death row. Who would pay 100 dollars more, to lose Thunderbolt 3 and a port and have less power? All to save 0.75 pounds.
    While I'm not about to defend the MacBook because I agree with you that it needs either an overhaul or death, I do want to raise a point about the curious inclusion of TB3 on the MBA. Only power-nerds like us in this forum are going to care about this in the slightest, and we will make up an extremely tiny single-digit percentage of the buyers of the new MBA. Due to USB-C peripherals being considerably cheaper and their needs more than met by USB-C, I predict it would be extremely rare to see a genuine Thunderbolt 3 accessory attached to an MBA in the wild, ever.

    So the USB-C/TB3 argument is, I think, almost entirely moot to typical buyers, and so is the power argument IMO. MB and MBA buyers are not doing "heavy lifting" computer work by and large -- both models are popular with students, light-duty users, writers, social media/websurfing mavens, and people who carry their machine with them everywhere. So the difference in speed is as moot as the difference in TB3/USB-C, or indeed the difference in the number of ports (thanks to the battery life of both machines).

    Especially for the writer, the student, and the traveller, the weight is a very key issue, and on that front -- finally -- the MB still makes a compelling argument that either model of MBA cannot match. Thus, the MB will still appeal to some people. That said, the MB badly needs a rethink to increase its value proposition if it's going to do well enough to stick around.
    mpw_amherst
  • Reply 37 of 56
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,992member
    Also the name "Air" itself makes sense when it was first came out. Now it doesn't since all Mac laptops are as light as "Air". This new MacBook Air is an odd ball.
    The Ford Mustang has wheels and not hooves. Odd.
    randominternetpersontitantiger
  • Reply 38 of 56
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,553member
    chasm said:
    tipoo said:
    The 12" particularly seems on death row. Who would pay 100 dollars more, to lose Thunderbolt 3 and a port and have less power? All to save 0.75 pounds.
    While I'm not about to defend the MacBook because I agree with you that it needs either an overhaul or death, I do want to raise a point about the curious inclusion of TB3 on the MBA. Only power-nerds like us in this forum are going to care about this in the slightest, and we will make up an extremely tiny single-digit percentage of the buyers of the new MBA. Due to USB-C peripherals being considerably cheaper and their needs more than met by USB-C, I predict it would be extremely rare to see a genuine Thunderbolt 3 accessory attached to an MBA in the wild, ever.

    So the USB-C/TB3 argument is, I think, almost entirely moot to typical buyers, and so is the power argument IMO. MB and MBA buyers are not doing "heavy lifting" computer work by and large -- both models are popular with students, light-duty users, writers, social media/websurfing mavens, and people who carry their machine with them everywhere. So the difference in speed is as moot as the difference in TB3/USB-C, or indeed the difference in the number of ports (thanks to the battery life of both machines).

    Especially for the writer, the student, and the traveller, the weight is a very key issue, and on that front -- finally -- the MB still makes a compelling argument that either model of MBA cannot match. Thus, the MB will still appeal to some people. That said, the MB badly needs a rethink to increase its value proposition if it's going to do well enough to stick around.
    What’s the video out support like on the rMB? Maybe they want the Air to be able to drive whatever displays they’re working on and need TB for that?
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 39 of 56
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,553member

    dewme said:
    Also the name "Air" itself makes sense when it was first came out. Now it doesn't since all Mac laptops are as light as "Air". This new MacBook Air is an odd ball.
    The Ford Mustang has wheels and not hooves. Odd.
    Haha. Reminds me of this:

    https://youtu.be/SmTh9fR3vVs

    I have a feeling they initially intended tended to kill the Air branding, but in their Mac soul search in the last couple years realized people *really* love the Air and the name recognition was worth it.  If they released it as a larger MB, people would be crying about how Apple killed their favorite Mac. The branding alone keeps that from happening and they sell millions more maybe, despite the fractured branding in the lineup. Another one of Tim’s “nice problem to have”.

    randominternetperson
  • Reply 40 of 56
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,277member
    What’s the video out support like on the rMB? Maybe they want the Air to be able to drive whatever displays they’re working on and need TB for that?
    According to the product page, the MB line can support an external 4K @60hz via a USB-C adapter.

    The MBA can support two 4K displays or one 5K display. Consumers likely to buy an MB or an MBA are unlikely to be using it extensively with such high-rez displays, but even the MB is totally fine for 99 percent of external-display needs.
    edited October 2018 likethesky
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