Nevada man thanks Siri for surviving serious Jeep crash

Posted:
in iPhone
A man who crashed his Jeep near Pahrump, Nev., credits Siri on his iPhone for saving him from paralyzing and potentially fatal injuries.

Nevada Jeep crash


The Jeep flipped into a dry lake bed, Nate Felix told KSNV, paralyzing most of his body to the point that he couldn't raise his head. Though his dog helped keep him warm, Felix began to worry that he wouldn't survive the night -- Pahrump is a desert town, and temperatures can get dangerously cold during winter nights.

He then realized he could make a call through Siri, and tried several contacts. None of these worked until he said, "Hey Siri, call 911," which finally put him in touch with emergency services. iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.

Responders pried open the Jeep's door to pull Felix out, bringing him to a hospital where he spent four days. Doctors discovered he had broken two vertebrae with nerve endings for his arms and hands. Though he's currently restricted to a wheelchair, he's hoping to recover.

Apple regularly promotes the accessibility features of the iPhone for the disabled. One recent example is the case of Scott Leason, a blind U.S. Navy veteran who uses his iPhone XR's VoiceOver feature to prepare for daily surfing lessons.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    "Thank you, Siri."

    "I can search for 'Thank you, Siri' on your iPhone."
    rrrizeburnsidechristophbmuthuk_vanalingammaltz
  • Reply 2 of 25
    iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.
    Huh? All cellphones ever built can call 911 without activation or when roaming on different networks. iPhones are nothing special.

    It's why we pay a 911 tax (at least in Canada, I'm not sure about you in the US.) The 911 call is routed through Bell Canada's network (ie, here in Canada, I'm not sure who carries it in the US) I once read. So Bell should be getting some of that 911 tax money in compensation for carrying those emergency calls.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    jdwjdw Posts: 785member
    A truly heartwarming story, and sadly one of the few things SIRI can do correctly.
    rrrizeburnsidemaltz
  • Reply 4 of 25
    bellsbells Posts: 131member
    jdw said:
    A truly heartwarming story, and sadly one of the few things SIRI can do correctly.
    You are just a hater. I just bought a home pod and I was expecting to hate siri based on what people like you say, but she is even more awesome than on the iPhone. First, she understands me incredibly well, from quite a distant further than my iPhone, and she can do quite a bit. Set a timer, make a phone call, tell me just about everything about famous people, countries, companies, etc. She can tell me what is playing at the movies, where the closet pizza place is, what the best pizza place is based on reviews, etc. Honestly, I find new things everyday she can do.Tell me about my day, jokes, the weather, the list goes on and on. 
    MacProleavingthebiggAppleExposedchasmDeelronwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 25
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,368member
    iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.
    Huh? All cellphones ever built can call 911 without activation or when roaming on different networks. iPhones are nothing special.

    It's why we pay a 911 tax (at least in Canada, I'm not sure about you in the US.) The 911 call is routed through Bell Canada's network (ie, here in Canada, I'm not sure who carries it in the US) I once read. So Bell should be getting some of that 911 tax money in compensation for carrying those emergency calls.
    Before Apple introduced Siri and the others copied, how exactly would you, if paralyzed, call 911?
    edited January 12 caladanianAppleExposedradarthekatbb-15Deelronwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 25
    MacPro said:
    iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.
    Huh? All cellphones ever built can call 911 without activation or when roaming on different networks. iPhones are nothing special.

    It's why we pay a 911 tax (at least in Canada, I'm not sure about you in the US.) The 911 call is routed through Bell Canada's network (ie, here in Canada, I'm not sure who carries it in the US) I once read. So Bell should be getting some of that 911 tax money in compensation for carrying those emergency calls.
    Before Apple introduced Siri and the others copied, how exactly would you, if paralyzed, call 911?
    Its Canada. Just say "Please" first...
    burnsideGeorgeBMacchristophbmacguijony0
  • Reply 7 of 25
    MacPro said:
    Before Apple introduced Siri and the others copied, how exactly would you, if paralyzed, call 911?
    I was referring only to the fact that AppleInsider said, which I quoted, "iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks." They didn't mention Siri in that sentence, so neither did I. Most people don't understand that a cell phone can call 911 without either a contract or a roaming plan. When I go to a cell phone store I like to ask the salesperson "Do I need a contract to be able to call 911?" They always say "yes," but the answer is "no." I don't think they are lying, I think they are all unaware of the truth. Perhaps you know better.

    To repeat, I was only referring to the AppleInsider statement that "the iPhone was specificially designed to call 911 even without a plan." All phones can do that. They may need a SIM, but that's a separate issue that neither AI nor myself was talking about. Sorry that I wasn't clear.
  • Reply 8 of 25
    profprof Posts: 76member
    iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.
    Huh? All cellphones ever built can call 911 without activation or when roaming on different networks. iPhones are nothing special.

    It's actually a gross mischaracterisation because you won't be even able to use Siri on a non-activated phone or a different networks thanks to f'ing cloud services.
    maltz
  • Reply 9 of 25
    "Thank you, Siri."

    "I can search for 'Thank you, Siri' on your iPhone."
    Huh? You must not have read the article.  It was about Siri hearing the victim and doing exactly what was needed?  I think you must be confusing this with a Macrumors thread you're on.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 25

    bells said:
    jdw said:
    A truly heartwarming story, and sadly one of the few things SIRI can do correctly.
    You are just a hater. I just bought a home pod and I was expecting to hate siri based on what people like you say, but she is even more awesome than on the iPhone. First, she understands me incredibly well, from quite a distant further than my iPhone, and she can do quite a bit. Set a timer, make a phone call, tell me just about everything about famous people, countries, companies, etc. She can tell me what is playing at the movies, where the closet pizza place is, what the best pizza place is based on reviews, etc. Honestly, I find new things everyday she can do.Tell me about my day, jokes, the weather, the list goes on and on. 

    It's one of those Internet myths that folks care about the 70K "skills" Alexa can do.  Yes, people have written various "skills" such as different fart sounds, but EVERY survey shows that Siri on Homepod can already do what the vast majority of people want their smart speakers to do, e.g., make calls, check on traffic, check on calendar, play music, set timers, read messages, control lights, etc. Of course, Siri does it without compromising your privacy and without having to listen to music or podcast with a tinny sounding throwaway speaker.
    tmayAppleExposedchasmradarthekatRayz2016bb-15Deelronmacxpresswatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 11 of 25
    Notsofast said:
    "Thank you, Siri."

    "I can search for 'Thank you, Siri' on your iPhone."
    Huh? You must not have read the article.  It was about Siri hearing the victim and doing exactly what was needed?  I think you must be confusing this with a Macrumors thread you're on.
    I’m not on any Macrumors threads. Just recalling all the frustrations I’ve enjoyed using Siri on Watch. 
  • Reply 12 of 25
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,503unconfirmed, member
    Worthless piece of crap.

    /s
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 25
    ivanhivanh Posts: 380member
    Thanks Siri?
    Not Thanks God? 
    Why don’t you thank your dad and mum? Not thanking the paramedic, rescuing team, doctors, spouse, friends. 
    A great Apple campaign for entering healthcare market.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 25
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,667member
    "Thank you, Siri."

    "I can search for 'Thank you, Siri' on your iPhone."
    If you didn't intend this as a joke, it should be removed for being complete BS.

    Try actually saying "thank you Siri" to your phone and see what actually happens. If you've ever actually used Siri, that is.
    Rayz2016ivanhwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 25
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,132moderator
    MacPro said:
    Before Apple introduced Siri and the others copied, how exactly would you, if paralyzed, call 911?
    I was referring only to the fact that AppleInsider said, which I quoted, "iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks." They didn't mention Siri in that sentence, so neither did I. Most people don't understand that a cell phone can call 911 without either a contract or a roaming plan. When I go to a cell phone store I like to ask the salesperson "Do I need a contract to be able to call 911?" They always say "yes," but the answer is "no." I don't think they are lying, I think they are all unaware of the truth. Perhaps you know better.

    To repeat, I was only referring to the AppleInsider statement that "the iPhone was specificially designed to call 911 even without a plan." All phones can do that. They may need a SIM, but that's a separate issue that neither AI nor myself was talking about. Sorry that I wasn't clear.
    Your point is taken.  But so is MacPro’s.  😊
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 25
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,132moderator

    ivanh said:
    Thanks Siri?
    Not Thanks God? 
    Why don’t you thank your dad and mum? Not thanking the paramedic, rescuing team, doctors, spouse, friends. 
    A great Apple campaign for entering healthcare market.
    Thanks Siri is not exclusive.  I imagine he thanked plenty of others. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 25
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,132moderator
    You were saying?
    "Thank you, Siri."

    "I can search for 'Thank you, Siri' on your iPhone."

    Rayz2016bb-15Deelronwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 25
    I didn't aim to cause a kerfuffle; just stating that the Siri result I get on Watch frustratingly often is an offer to continue on my phone. Apologies for my jaunty banter in this world-changing discussion.
    beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 19 of 25
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,764member
    I didn't aim to cause a kerfuffle; just stating that the Siri result I get on Watch frustratingly often is an offer to continue on my phone. Apologies for my jaunty banter in this world-changing discussion.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,138member
    MacPro said:
    iPhones are designed to call emergency services even without activation or when roaming on different networks.
    Huh? All cellphones ever built can call 911 without activation or when roaming on different networks. iPhones are nothing special.

    It's why we pay a 911 tax (at least in Canada, I'm not sure about you in the US.) The 911 call is routed through Bell Canada's network (ie, here in Canada, I'm not sure who carries it in the US) I once read. So Bell should be getting some of that 911 tax money in compensation for carrying those emergency calls.
    Before Apple introduced Siri and the others copied, how exactly would you, if paralyzed, call 911?
    Its Canada. Just say "Please" first...
    Eh?

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