Apple's 'There's More to iPhone' campaign highlights environmental and data protection fea...

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has rolled out an advertising campaign titled "There's more to iPhone" to the United Kingdom and France, with a trio of videos and a corporate microsite highlighting how Apple and the iPhone handles and protects a user's data, recycles devices, and offers software improvements that even help older models go faster.




Continuing a campaign that started last year in Germany, the campaign aims to frame the iPhone and Apple itself as a responsible device and company with regards to the environment and its users. The regional British and French microsite offers the same talking points and animations, promoting Apple's ethical approach to device management and production.

On the data protection side, the site boasts about how Apple believes data privacy is a "fundamental human right," that it would never sell a user's data, as well the ability for Safari's Intelligent Tracking Prevention to limit advertising tracking. It also offers more technically-minded highlights, such as Face ID storing a mathematical value created by the features of the user's face that is impossible to recreate a likeness from, the fragmenting of Apple Maps data, encryption of FaceTime calls, and the ability to remotely lock and erase an iPhone.





In terms of the environment, Apple highlights how Apple Stores take old smartphones and recycle them for free, with materials recovered for reuse and resulting in fewer resources needed to be mined from the ground. Daisy, Apple's iPhone dismantling robot, is also given a shoutout, along with revealing that Apple achieved a Zero Waste to Landfill certification for all iPhone final assembly lines worldwide in 2017.

The three videos published to the Apple UK YouTube channel on Friday are brief and restate the talking points relating to remote erasure, data protection and the disassembly robot. Each also points users towards the regional microsite for more information.





While the campaign has appeared in just three countries so far, it is likely that Apple will make more versions for other markets in the near future, including a version for North America.





«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 881member
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
  • Reply 2 of 24
    This is all great messaging but all my less techy friends and family talk about is battery life. That's literally it. They have almost no complaints about their iPhones aside from that.
  • Reply 3 of 24
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,181member
    These campaigns are always nice to see but Apple needs to be careful as it is a high profile target for some groups in the EU.

    Claims such as 'recycling for free' will almost certainly be picked up on. When I was working on WEEE drafts years ago, it was very clear that the cost of recycling was factored into the purchase price. I have seen nothing to indicate that that ever changed.

    Likewise, Apple isn't even taking back anything out of any different approach to any other manufacturer.  On the one hand it cannot refuse to take back the product and on the other, it desperately wants them back to extract rare earth elements from them. 
    edited March 1
  • Reply 4 of 24
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 823member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Wasn't that patched in 12.1.4 back on Feb 7th 2019?
    AppleExposedStrangeDaysanantksundaramfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 24
    ...hmmm privacy - I've always wondered why the remote wipe feature needed full time location tracking (find my iphone) and services (remote wipe) on prior to a loss, vs being able to simply wipe after loss ie. separate the two features...? And do all roads still seem to lead to iCloud (it seems established that the cloud has priivacy risks) and in the US presumably falls under the Patriot Act, and is that a privacy subject unto itself...?
    gatorguy
  • Reply 6 of 24
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 823member
    This is all great messaging but all my less techy friends and family talk about is battery life. That's literally it. They have almost no complaints about their iPhones aside from that.
    What do your friends being "Less Techy" as you put it, have to do with them complaining about battery life?  If they were more "techy" would this mean less as an issue to them? Haha that's just a confusing part to add? 

    I personally have never had an issue where my iPhone's didn't last a whole day for me. My Xs Max is no different. I always keep background refresh off and use location services only when the app needing it is open.  Personally I find when folks in my circle complain of their battery and I look at their iPhone they usually always have background app refresh on and the screen brightness on TORCH mode.  I think people don't realize how fast a screen turned all the way up or nearly all the way up impacts battery life.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 24
    tjwolftjwolf Posts: 298member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    gutengelAppleExposedStrangeDaysfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 24
    kruegdudekruegdude Posts: 340member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    No.
    AppleExposedanantksundaramfastasleep
  • Reply 9 of 24
    jcs2305 said:
    This is all great messaging but all my less techy friends and family talk about is battery life. That's literally it. They have almost no complaints about their iPhones aside from that.
    What do your friends being "Less Techy" as you put it, have to do with them complaining about battery life?  If they were more "techy" would this mean less as an issue to them? Haha that's just a confusing part to add? 

    I personally have never had an issue where my iPhone's didn't last a whole day for me. My Xs Max is no different. I always keep background refresh off and use location services only when the app needing it is open.  Personally I find when folks in my circle complain of their battery and I look at their iPhone they usually always have background app refresh on and the screen brightness on TORCH mode.  I think people don't realize how fast a screen turned all the way up or nearly all the way up impacts battery life.
    Fair question but your 2nd paragraph is why I said it. The more techy types know the ways to maximize battery life. All my phones have been good! But I'm religious at plugging in when I'm in the car or at my desk. As an investor, I would love to see battery life given more priority. Average people care about this. I don't think average people care as much about what they're promoting in these ads.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 24
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 331member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    You seems to be pretty ignorant on how programming works. The bug was not intentional and was fixes after 2 weeks. Switch to a Galaxy and wait 2 years for your security update to arrive.
    AppleExposedStrangeDaysfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 24
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,095member
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Another good reason to stick with the company who supplies the OS. In the case of Android that would be Google and its Pixels. 
  • Reply 12 of 24
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 881member
    gutengel said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    You seems to be pretty ignorant on how programming works. The bug was not intentional and was fixes after 2 weeks. Switch to a Galaxy and wait 2 years for your security update to arrive.

    So the iPhone was insecure 2 out of 52 weeks in a year (that we know of: who knows when a teenager will find the next exploit before apple
    does). I don’t like those odds. Apple QC has missed the mark lately. You can defend them at all costs as a fanboy but the real world will only remember the privacy exploit and apples reputation suffers as a consequence. 
    edited March 1
  • Reply 13 of 24
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,501unconfirmed, member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 


    It was a BUG. Apple fixed it quickly. This is the new #Bendgate and we'll be hearing about it 5 years from now.


    Meanwhile other companies spy on you, those aren't bugs.


    gatorguy said:
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Another good reason to stick with the company who supplies the OS. In the case of Android that would be Google and its Pixels. 

    Vocal android fans don't like android, they hate Apple. The proof is in the pudding when no one wants a Pixel.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 24
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 823member
    jcs2305 said:
    This is all great messaging but all my less techy friends and family talk about is battery life. That's literally it. They have almost no complaints about their iPhones aside from that.
    What do your friends being "Less Techy" as you put it, have to do with them complaining about battery life?  If they were more "techy" would this mean less as an issue to them? Haha that's just a confusing part to add? 

    I personally have never had an issue where my iPhone's didn't last a whole day for me. My Xs Max is no different. I always keep background refresh off and use location services only when the app needing it is open.  Personally I find when folks in my circle complain of their battery and I look at their iPhone they usually always have background app refresh on and the screen brightness on TORCH mode.  I think people don't realize how fast a screen turned all the way up or nearly all the way up impacts battery life.
    Fair question but your 2nd paragraph is why I said it. The more techy types know the ways to maximize battery life. All my phones have been good! But I'm religious at plugging in when I'm in the car or at my desk. As an investor, I would love to see battery life given more priority. Average people care about this. I don't think average people care as much about what they're promoting in these ads.
    Honestly I found out battery saving tips years ago with a google search. Anyone can find info they are looking for on the internet, not just us tech types. B) Apple has been touting software improvements for battery life since Low Power mode was introduced in IOS 9. So I don't think that they are ignoring it, but to be fair learning how to use your $800.00 plus dollar device is important as well.

    Even your comment about always being plugged at your desk and car as though you need that lifeline is a good example of a someone needing to understand what is going on with their device and what is acceptable as normal with battery drain.

    I have seen time and time again apps being a culprit of battery drain as well, especially after an IOS update.

    From 2016..

    and September 2018


    Here is a step by step instruction of how to identify what app is draining your battery..



    As an investor I would think you would care about Apple selling products, not worry about battery life? However as a customer battery life and other areas we see as deficient with our personal devices would be a definite concern for me. 






    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 24
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 823member
    tyler82 said:
    gutengel said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    You seems to be pretty ignorant on how programming works. The bug was not intentional and was fixes after 2 weeks. Switch to a Galaxy and wait 2 years for your security update to arrive.

    So the iPhone was insecure 2 out of 52 weeks in a year (that we know of: who knows when a teenager will find the next exploit before apple
    does). I don’t like those odds. Apple QC has missed the mark lately. You can defend them at all costs as a fanboy but the real world will only remember the privacy exploit and apples reputation suffers as a consequence. 
    You don't need to be a fanboy to state facts. That term is so childish IMHO, and please stop the bullshit..Samsung made phones that burned and damaged property and the Samsung loyal were right there when the next model was released..shoot some people wouldn't even turn their phones in once recalled so Sammy had to brick them in order to get them out of the wild. 

    My point isn't about Samsung it's just your overstatement of how much the real world remembers or cares about things like this. There are other phones on the market that never receive bug fixes, yet people continue to buy them and not care at all. I personally don't use face time so this was never a concern of mine. Guess that's a pretty fanboyish remark to make hahahaha.
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 24
    pk22901pk22901 Posts: 139member
    gutengel said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    You seems to be pretty ignorant on how programming works. The bug was not intentional and was fixes after 2 weeks. Switch to a Galaxy and wait 2 years for your security update to arrive.
    Typo fixed: "Switch to a Galaxy and wait 2 years for your security update to [never] arrive."
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 24
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,450member
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Quick fixing is only one part of the equation, software quality is the other.
    ”all software has bugs” is really a “dooddoener” (a NOP in machine language) and is also untrue (some software can be proven correct for example). Coding language choice is really important and can prevent most (if not all) security problems we see nowadays.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 24
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 881member
    Whether a "bug" due to negligent software engineering or purposeful intent, the point is that the iPhone isn't the fully secure enclave that Apple is trying to advertise it as. 

    Being more secure than Android doesn't make it a secure device. I want Apple to do better because I value my privacy.
    edited March 1
  • Reply 19 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,541member
    gatorguy said:
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Another good reason to stick with the company who supplies the OS. In the case of Android that would be Google and its Pixels. 
    Even some of Google's Pixel flagships received a short lifespan of supported updates. It was just a couple years as I recall...very weak compared to iPhone supported versions.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 24
    tyler82 said:
    Whether a "bug" due to negligent software engineering or purposeful intent, the point is that the iPhone isn't the fully secure enclave that Apple is trying to advertise it as. 

    Being more secure than Android doesn't make it a secure device. I want Apple to do better because I value my privacy.
    Apple do do better!

    You don’t get this. A bug is not due to “purposeful intent” given that it is an unintended software defect! Any moderately complex piece of software will have bugs (just look at the release notes from you app developers when they update an app) and an operating system is incredibly complex. The difference is what happens when bugs are found. Apple addresses them ASAP, but, and this is crucial, is able to deliver the fix to millions of customers almost instantly. This is what happens when you make the device and it’s software and control the update process.

    The FaceTime issue was a bug. What Apple are pointing out with their series of adverts is that iOS is designed intentionally to be secure and to highly value privacy. That is a feature that Apple deliver to a higher degree than any other consumer device manufacturer.
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.