CorelDRAW returns to Mac with upgraded vector tools, Touch Bar support & more

Posted:
in Mac Software
Corel on Tuesday released CorelDRAW Graphics Suite 2019 for the Mac, marking the first time the suite has been updated for macOS in years.

CorelDRAW 2019


The suite includes apps for illustration, photo editing (Photo-Paint), font management (Font Manager), and RAW image processing (AfterShot 3 HDR). Corel's new vector graphics tools include LiveSketch, which uses AI and machine learning to transform freeform drawing into precise lines.

Corel promises "an experience that feels natively Mac," reflecting Apple's design principles. The company has accordingly implemented a streamlined UI, macOS Mojave's Dark Mode, and Touch Bar support on MacBook Pros. Touch commands affect everything from text to layout settings.

Other changes include a redesigned Objects Docker, non-destructive effects, an "Align to Pixel Grid" button, and a Web interface, CorelDRAW.app.

CorelDRAW 2019


The 2019 Graphics Suite costs $499 as a one-time purchase, or $198 per year for a continuously-upgraded edition. CorelDRAW is also available through the Mac App Store, but only in subscription form.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,242member
    DOA.
    SpamSandwichcornchipsportyguy209DanManTXols
  • Reply 2 of 28
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 583member

    unpopular opinion: behind the awful free fonts and clip art was a vector drawing app that was at least a decade ahead of Adobe Illustrator, so obviously better I still get furious

    If this is a real Mac app and not some Java/Adobe Air pile of crap like Illustrator, cause for excitement. Although we have options like Affinity Designer now...

    gatorguycornchipsportyguy209fastasleep
  • Reply 3 of 28
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,015member
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
  • Reply 4 of 28
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,167member
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    Affinity Designer seems to be well-liked, I keep meaning to get around to trying it out in earnest.
    cornchipzoidbertsportyguy209fotoformat
  • Reply 5 of 28
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,167member
    DOA.
    Disclaimer, Corel bought the code to one of my programs years ago but I must say I have never found anything they do Mac-like or remotely enjoyable to use.
    sportyguy209
  • Reply 6 of 28
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,452member
    Given the choice between AI and Corel, and I do have a choice as I own current copies of both (as much as you can "own" an Adobe product now) I much prefer CorelDraw's vector program. Those dismissing Corel without trying it are doing themselves a disservice IMHO. It's far better than given credit for, particularly the text controls.

    PhotoPaint and AfterShot not so much. 
    edited March 12 ols
  • Reply 7 of 28
    TuuborTuubor Posts: 36member
    Affinity Designer, 55€ for life and something like 30€ for the iPad Pro. Simply beautiful.
    sportyguy209fotoformatmdriftmeyer
  • Reply 8 of 28
    georgie01georgie01 Posts: 236member
    Interesting how people are criticising it before even really seeing it, let alone actually using it...

    On a serious note, it’s really nice to see a company offer software with a one time purchase. Like how it should be. Even if it is rather expensive.

    Encouraging subscriptions is something I feel that Apple has gotten terribly wrong. Take it to the next step and we’ll be buying subscriptions to keep using our iPhones and Macs and TVs by holding the software that runs them hostage to a subscription charge. Doing that with apps is barely any different, considering we rely on apps to make our hardware useful.
    edited March 12 Eric_WVGG
  • Reply 9 of 28
    CorelDraw was always the underdog but they still keep plugging away.

    I doubt this will cause people to jump from Illustrator, but I am really curious as to how good it is.

    I’m a little surprised by the price, though.
  • Reply 10 of 28
    georgie01 said:
    Interesting how people are criticising it before even really seeing it, let alone actually using it...

    On a serious note, it’s really nice to see a company offer software with a one time purchase. Like how it should be. Even if it is rather expensive.

    Encouraging subscriptions is something I feel that Apple has gotten terribly wrong. Take it to the next step and we’ll be buying subscriptions to keep using our iPhones and Macs and TVs by holding the software that runs them hostage to a subscription charge. Doing that with apps is barely any different, considering we rely on apps to make our hardware useful.
    Affinity Designer and Photo are purchased programs for a reasonable price. I recommend them both, and can't wait for their InDesign competitor, Publisher. The beta is awesome! Much rather give Affinity my money for purchases than Adobe for rentals.
    mdriftmeyerMacPro
  • Reply 11 of 28
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,015member
    MacPro said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    Affinity Designer seems to be well-liked, I keep meaning to get around to trying it out in earnest.
    I tried it and it’s just a mess in terms of production efficiency compared to Illustrator. Just not even a competitor at this point.
  • Reply 12 of 28
    1348513485 Posts: 40member
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    This.

    Until all your output vendors accept something other than Illustrator (or ID) files, this app is going to have a difficult time. I would check with them before buying this.

    Not that I don't think Adobe is an overpriced, non-user friendly, visually hideous pile of do-do, but it's the only pile that has consensus acceptance.
  • Reply 13 of 28
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,452member
    13485 said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    This.

    Until all your output vendors accept something other than Illustrator (or ID) files, this app is going to have a difficult time. I would check with them before buying this.

    Not that I don't think Adobe is an overpriced, non-user friendly, visually hideous pile of do-do, but it's the only pile that has consensus acceptance.
    CorelDraw has really broad file support so it's not a hindrance for the program nor for import/export capability in my workflow.
    http://product.corel.com/help/CorelDRAW/540223850/Main/EN/Documentation/wwhelp/wwhimpl/common/html/wwhelp.htm#href=CorelDRAW-Supported-file-formats.html&single=true

    FWIW very few of my customers send only AI files and outside vendors rarely insist on them. Some don't even want them. Most often it's EPS or PDF when doing file exchanges between ourselves and clients. 
    edited March 12
  • Reply 14 of 28
    BluntBlunt Posts: 223member
    Eric_WVGG said:

    unpopular opinion: behind the awful free fonts and clip art was a vector drawing app that was at least a decade ahead of Adobe Illustrator, so obviously better I still get furious


    Not even close. And yes back in the day i owned a pc too and i had CorelDRAW i stalled. CorelDRAW postscript took forever to print. Illustrator was way beter. CorelDRAW had loads of gimmick like tools. Bezier drawing felt so much beter in Illustrator.
    So Illustrator didn't had the fancy stuff but was way more pro.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 15 of 28
    grifmxgrifmx Posts: 87member
    what's your Vector Victor?
  • Reply 16 of 28
    1348513485 Posts: 40member
    gatorguy said:
    13485 said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    This.

    Until all your output vendors accept something other than Illustrator (or ID) files, this app is going to have a difficult time. I would check with them before buying this.

    Not that I don't think Adobe is an overpriced, non-user friendly, visually hideous pile of do-do, but it's the only pile that has consensus acceptance.
    CorelDraw has really broad file support so it's not a hindrance for the program nor for import/export capability in my workflow.
    http://product.corel.com/help/CorelDRAW/540223850/Main/EN/Documentation/wwhelp/wwhimpl/common/html/wwhelp.htm#href=CorelDRAW-Supported-file-formats.html&single=true

    FWIW very few of my customers send only AI files and outside vendors rarely insist on them. Some don't even want them. Most often it's EPS or PDF when doing file exchanges between ourselves and clients. 
    Well, all I can say is that we use vendors from across the country, and the file type they want is Illustrator, for print, banners, posters, even booth graphics. It's been that way since the last days of Pagemaker. You may be the exception. I'm not saying nothing else will possibly work, just that the pre-press guys are going to be pissed.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 17 of 28
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,242member
    MacPro said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    Affinity Designer seems to be well-liked, I keep meaning to get around to trying it out in earnest.
    It's fantastic and gets better with age.
  • Reply 18 of 28
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,242member
    MacPro said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    Affinity Designer seems to be well-liked, I keep meaning to get around to trying it out in earnest.
    I tried it and it’s just a mess in terms of production efficiency compared to Illustrator. Just not even a competitor at this point.
    I'd say its a reflection on your inability to adapt seeing as over several million former Illustrator users are now Designer fanatics.
    MacPro
  • Reply 19 of 28
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,452member
    13485 said:
    gatorguy said:
    13485 said:
    Adobe Illustrator still rules the vector art roost.
    This.

    Until all your output vendors accept something other than Illustrator (or ID) files, this app is going to have a difficult time. I would check with them before buying this.

    Not that I don't think Adobe is an overpriced, non-user friendly, visually hideous pile of do-do, but it's the only pile that has consensus acceptance.
    CorelDraw has really broad file support so it's not a hindrance for the program nor for import/export capability in my workflow.
    http://product.corel.com/help/CorelDRAW/540223850/Main/EN/Documentation/wwhelp/wwhimpl/common/html/wwhelp.htm#href=CorelDRAW-Supported-file-formats.html&single=true

    FWIW very few of my customers send only AI files and outside vendors rarely insist on them. Some don't even want them. Most often it's EPS or PDF when doing file exchanges between ourselves and clients. 
    Well, all I can say is that we use vendors from across the country, and the file type they want is Illustrator, for print, banners, posters, even booth graphics. It's been that way since the last days of Pagemaker. You may be the exception. I'm not saying nothing else will possibly work, just that the pre-press guys are going to be pissed.
    You aren't given options to send EPS or PDF in addition to/instead of AI? That's odd.

    I print thousands of banners, posters, vehicle wraps, and yes even booth (trade show) graphics for customers across the region every year and have done so for well over a decade. I would not insist customers only submit artwork in AI format. I'd lose more than a few jobs and even customers if I did so. 
    edited March 12
  • Reply 20 of 28
    mtefremtefre Posts: 12member
    Well, all I can say is that we use vendors from across the country, and the file type they want is Illustrator, for print, banners, posters, even booth graphics. It's been that way since the last days of Pagemaker. You may be the exception. I'm not saying nothing else will possibly work, just that the pre-press guys are going to be pissed.
    You aren't given options to send EPS or PDF in addition to/instead of AI? That's odd.

    I print thousands of banners, posters, vehicle wraps, and yes even booth (trade show) graphics for customers across the region every year and have done so for well over a decade. I would not insist customers only submit artwork in AI format. I'd lose more than a few jobs and even customers if I did so. 
    I worked with pre press for textiles and preferred AI-files. EPS was also fine. PDF not so much as they could be harder to edit.
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