Jamf's Apple device management platform gets Google sign-on support

Posted:
in Mac Software edited March 28
Jamf's Apple device management platform is being upgraded with Google Cloud Identity support, letting corporate and educational users quickly access their Mac apps.

2018 MacBook Air


Users can log into a Mac with either Cloud Identity or G Suite credentials, Jamf said. Administrators can meanwhile create local accounts based on Cloud Identity users, and where permitted sync passwords with a directory. The technology also supports multi-factor authentication at the macOS login screen.

The upgrade is aimed mainly at schools, Jamf said, since Google Cloud is the primary identity provider in education. Google not only offers many multi-platform services, but has established a strong beachfront in educational hardware since Chromebooks are frequently cheaper than Macs, iPads, or Windows PCs, as well as being easier to administrate.

Cloud Identity authentication is said to be so seamless that people can immediately go from unboxing a Mac to login and app access.

In September last year Jamf jumped into identity authentication by acquiring NoMAD, suppliers of another Mac-focused option. NoMAD is available in both a free open-source version and in commercial deployments via Jamf Connect.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,545member
    Jamf is okay with compromising your privacy. Got it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 6
    Seems as if Apple has just given up on the .edu market, especially K-12.  They've ceded the services to MS, Google, and others.  It's ironic considering their recent push towards services in the consumer market.  What could have been.  If only someone had thought beyond the hardware and planned a cohesive .edu experience.  Instead they let Google do it.  Too bad.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 6
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,618member
    chasm said:
    Jamf is okay with compromising your privacy. Got it.
    It couldn't be that you simply don't understand the whole Chromebooks in the Classroom concept, student privacy and enforcement of it, and therefor JAMF must not be concerned about security. Nah, it couldn't be that you just don't know.
    edited March 29 1STnTENDERBITS
  • Reply 4 of 6
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,545member
    gatorguy said:
    chasm said:
    Jamf is okay with compromising your privacy. Got it.
    It couldn't be that you simply don't understand the whole Chromebooks in the Classroom concept, student privacy and enforcement of it, and therefor JAMF must not be concerned about security. Nah, it couldn't be that you just don't know.
    It’s entirely possible that I need more eduction (#seewhatididthere) on how Chromebooks in the EDU section are a special exception to Google’s business model and are a walled garden of security and privacy. Fair enough.

    But I do know what Google’s business model is, and what it depends on, so until I can be convinced otherwise, colour me highly skeptical that creating an education environment that is highly dependent on Google-only apps and an OS run by Google that for non-students trafficks heavily in information harvesting, targeting, sale, and manipulation is some kind of special exception for Google.

    I’m also very aware of Google’s single-sign-in track record for security, not all that different from Facebook’s. Single-sign-in across multiple disparate and separate websites/services is a very bad idea, generally speaking.
    edited March 29 watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 6
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,618member
    chasm said:
    gatorguy said:
    chasm said:
    Jamf is okay with compromising your privacy. Got it.
    It couldn't be that you simply don't understand the whole Chromebooks in the Classroom concept, student privacy and enforcement of it, and therefor JAMF must not be concerned about security. Nah, it couldn't be that you just don't know.
    It’s entirely possible that I need more eduction (#seewhatididthere) on how Chromebooks in the EDU section are a special exception to Google’s business model and are a walled garden of security and privacy. Fair enough.

    But I do know what Google’s business model is, and what it depends on, so until I can be convinced otherwise, colour me highly skeptical that creating an education environment that is highly dependent on Google-only apps and an OS run by Google that for non-students trafficks heavily in information harvesting, targeting, sale, and manipulation is some kind of special exception for Google.

    I’m also very aware of Google’s single-sign-in track record for security, not all that different from Facebook’s. Single-sign-in across multiple disparate and separate websites/services is a very bad idea, generally speaking.
    Education sign-ins are not typical user sign-ins. If a high school student has a Google account they cannot use that as their school account. They are separate unconnected things. 

    It's pretty easy, even quick, to find about the details on Google accounts for education. 
    The FAQ's are here, along with links to the legal documents:
    https://edu.google.com/training-support/privacy-security/?modal_active=none
  • Reply 6 of 6
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,618member
    chasm said:
    gatorguy said:
    chasm said:
    Jamf is okay with compromising your privacy. Got it.
    It couldn't be that you simply don't understand the whole Chromebooks in the Classroom concept, student privacy and enforcement of it, and therefor JAMF must not be concerned about security. Nah, it couldn't be that you just don't know.
    ... colour me highly skeptical that creating an education environment that is highly dependent on Google-only apps and an OS run by Google that for non-students trafficks heavily in information harvesting, targeting, sale, and manipulation is some kind of special exception for Google.
    Corrected.
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