Microsoft brings formerly Windows-centric Defender antivirus to macOS

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 34
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,729member
    flydog said:
    Johan42 said:
    All this anti-Microsoft rant is hilarious. Maybe learn how to use technology and you won’t have an issue with it. I’ve been using both Mac and PC since my early teens and never had an issue with either.
    Not sure what knowing “how to use technology” has to do with bloatware, ads, security problems, and poor customer service. 

    In any case, I’ve been using Windows since 2.1 so I know a little about “how to use”it. The last decent version of Windows was XP, and every version since then has been an unmitigated disaster. 
    XP was a workhorse that I do remember with some fondness. Vista was a minefield. 7 wasn't bad all things concidered. 8 was a horror show that must never be spoken of again. Now I'm using, and supporting 10 at work. It's pretty good. Quite stable, yes there are regular updates, but not the dozen or more big patches per week of the bad old days. It runs well on older hardware. Honestly it's pretty good. Mind you if you are coming from XP it is like a whole new world. None of the old habits work any more. But once you learn a few tricks all the old tools seem to be there, just not obvious. If you were coming from macOS 10.7 to the currant revision, you'd have the same issues.
    pscooter63
  • Reply 22 of 34
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,273member
    ElCapitan said:
    lkrupp said:
    petri said:
    If there was any form of anti virus I was less likely to install on my Mac than any of the current crop, it’s Microsoft anti virus. 
    It’ll sell like hotcakes. In the mind of the public Microsoft is a trusted brand. You’d be amazed at how many Mac users have anti-virus software installed. You see them all over the place in the Apple Discussion Forums asking which AV is the best. When troubleshooting  in the forums tons of people have AV installed. With any bug, glitch, malfunction, etc. the typical user assumes right away it is caused by a “virus” without even knowing what a virus is. That’s the fact of life with the general public. So while Mac tech blog forums will be full of snickering and sarcasm the typical Mac user will probably jump on it.
    In the mind of Mac users Microsoft is NOT a trusted brand! - Maybe in a parallel reality...
    You speak for all Mac users now? Wow! I didn’t know I approved of that. 
  • Reply 23 of 34
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,268member
    lkrupp said:
    petri said:
    If there was any form of anti virus I was less likely to install on my Mac than any of the current crop, it’s Microsoft anti virus. 
    It’ll sell like hotcakes. In the mind of the public Microsoft is a trusted brand. You’d be amazed at how many Mac users have anti-virus software installed. You see them all over the place in the Apple Discussion Forums asking which AV is the best. When troubleshooting  in the forums tons of people have AV installed. With any bug, glitch, malfunction, etc. the typical user assumes right away it is caused by a “virus” without even knowing what a virus is. That’s the fact of life with the general public. So while Mac tech blog forums will be full of snickering and sarcasm the typical Mac user will probably jump on it.
    There are precious few viruses for MacOS, but there is an increasing amount of Malware which is as bad or worse; I had to wipe and reinstall my dad's iMac a few months ago because he inadvertently got some malware on it. Most security people I've read recommend getting some sort of antivirus/antimalware software for you computer, whether it's a Mac or a PC
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 34
    For all these people commenting about antivirus on Mac, in a CORPORATE IT ENVIRONMENT it is actually very helpful and COULD be necessary as part of an overall solution/plan.  Many Macs themselves would not be impacted by Windows-based viruses and malware, but they CAN and do aide in "spreading" those problems to Windows-based machines on their networks, especially if they are not caught.  The Windows machines SHOULD catch themselves, but no good IT department wants to rely on just that type of protection.  

    It's only a matter of time before this becomes required use for many Mac users in corporate environments.  Let's just hope it's implemented in a way where it does not impact Adobe or other creative software.  Mac users basically need admin privileges to manage that software as it is... 
    galfridus
  • Reply 25 of 34
    Johan42 said:
    All this anti-Microsoft rant is hilarious. Maybe learn how to use technology and you won’t have an issue with it. I’ve been using both Mac and PC since my early teens and never had an issue with either.
    When you get down into the depths of Clustering, shared storage and everything else the levels of frustration with a lot of the idiotic decisions that have been made increases. One set of updates removed all MSCS control from powershell. All of our automation used powershell scripts. That left a system that was one the verge of going live DOA. Eventally it was fixed but the whole episode left a bitter taste in everyones mouths. I could go on at length but I'd bore everyone silly.
    Developing software for MacOS(OSX) and Linux is a doddle when compared to Windows especially Windows 10/Server 2016.
    There is a lot more to life than just using a Mac and a PC.
    DAalseth
  • Reply 26 of 34
    Oh, the comments... look, the reason it's being offered is easy: If a business is deploying Macs alongside their Windows boxes, then using Defender across both platforms makes it easier for everyone. And it's not necessarily being rolled-out to protect the Macs, but rather to help make sure the Macs aren't used as an attack vector against the Windows boxes. It only makes sense.
    n2itivguybeowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 34
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,691member
    Johan42 said:
    All this anti-Microsoft rant is hilarious. Maybe learn how to use technology and you won’t have an issue with it. I’ve been using both Mac and PC since my early teens and never had an issue with either.
    Hahaha were you in your early teens like a year or two ago?

    I still have nightmares about IE6. I’ve never run into more 404s than when I try to follow support docs on Microsoft’s own website. I cannot even begin to tell you how many Microsoft messes I’ve had to clean out of peoples’ Macs, or deal with shitty activation issues, etc etc. Their software goes nowhere on my Mac except for VMs. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 34
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,747member
    hexclock said:
    Johan42 said:
    All this anti-Microsoft rant is hilarious. Maybe learn how to use technology and you won’t have an issue with it. I’ve been using both Mac and PC since my early teens and never had an issue with either.
    You’ve probably never used Win 95 or 98 in a workplace setting. Because if you had, you would have experienced issues. If I am mistaken, then hats off, because you’d be one of the lucky few. 
    20 year old gripes are hardly relevant.
  • Reply 29 of 34
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,246member
    petri said:
    If there was any form of anti virus I was less likely to install on my Mac than any of the current crop, it’s Microsoft anti virus. 
    From what I remember, It's actually rated pretty good and it's FREE. Really, you shouldn't count on a any Anti-Virus program to protect you. Most don't on 0-Day stuff, etc. You need to use your brain and praticr safe computer use habits. Torrenting pirated stuff, Risky. Not downloading software from the source or a well known company. Opening crap in your e-mail. Not Updating your apps you have. Having stuff on your computer you really don't need. The less garbage on your computer, the less risk of holes any of those apps could cause you.

    Don't expect any Anti-Virus program to protect you doing dumb things. You really are wasting your money these days paying some other company like Norton. It's built into Windows 10. It's all you need. You can download Defender for Windows 7 & 8. Free on Mac, why not. I think MS is doing quite a good job supporting iOS. Even when Windows Phone was out, those users were complaining that iOS was getting all the new stuff. I'm not a Mac person. I'm a long time Windows user since Windows 95 having come from the Amiga before that. One of my brothers is a big Mac guy, so much so, he has a Mac Mini to use for Work where everyone else has Windows Computer. He's tried to get me to switch for the last 20+ years. Haven't done it for a number of reasons. Though Windows 8 almost was sending me in that direction.

    I am a long time iOS user. I'm on my 3rd iPhone. I upgrade every 4 years. I'm on my second iPad, my current one is a second gen 12.9" Pro. I have the Original Apple Watch, 3 Apple TV 3's, 2 of which have been replaced with 4's. So I'm in the Windows/iOS world and it's just fine.

    Google on the other hand I try to avoid.
    beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 30 of 34
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,823member
    MacPro said:
    Since Satya Nadella came and Balmer 'went' I have increasingly become less anti-Microsoft.  I enjoy using Windows 10, initially in Boot Camp and now I have three PCs on my Network along with five Macs.  I may be 'at home' but this certainly sounds something I will look at because I still fear the weakest link is Windows and it is on my LAN so it may be worth adding an extra layer.  Windows Defender on my PCs in Windows 10 Pro is non-intrusive and seamless, it's not your old Windows.  Don't get me wrong, if I don't need it I won't use it, I am just willing to investigate without prejudice, something I would not have said a few years ago.
    I have to agree with your sentiment. In fact, I often find myself helping the hapless who have purchased new PCs with trial or time-bombed versions of McAfee forced on them by the PC maker (yes Dell I'm talking about you!) get McAfee fully extracted like a rotten tooth and Windows Defender properly installed and functioning. The difference in user experience between McAfee and Windows Defender is astounding. Windows 10 with Windows Defender seems quite stable and it's not in your face all the time. Windows 10 is still not as pleasant to use as macOS but it's not tortuous either. I keep a Windows-to-Go copy of Windows 10 Pro on an external SSD that I can boot from when I need a full speed Windows machine and don't want it to touch anything on the host Mac's internal storage.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 34
    petri said:
    If there was any form of anti virus I was less likely to install on my Mac than any of the current crop, it’s Microsoft anti virus. 
    This is their Advanced Defender which comes with the enterprise licensing,    I was surprised as the rest...haven't seen the mac variant yet but the windows variant is nearly feature complete and not bloatware surprisingly.
  • Reply 32 of 34
    hexclock said:
    Johan42 said:
    All this anti-Microsoft rant is hilarious. Maybe learn how to use technology and you won’t have an issue with it. I’ve been using both Mac and PC since my early teens and never had an issue with either.
    You’ve probably never used Win 95 or 98 in a workplace setting. Because if you had, you would have experienced issues. If I am mistaken, then hats off, because you’d be one of the lucky few. 
    Oh, it's nothing like that. He's just a fresh new troll that's been spat out from under the bridge.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 34
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 375member
    DAalseth said:
    petri said:
    If there was any form of anti virus I was less likely to install on my Mac than any of the current crop, it’s Microsoft anti virus. 
    Well, other than Kaspersky of course.
    +1
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 34
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,391member
    Actually, I would say that Microsoft is -- and deserves to be! -- a trusted brand in the Mac world. Some people on these forums are still fighting the Mac/PC wars like the Japanese on that island that didn't know WWII ended, quite clearly.

    Let me say first that I, personally, am not an MS user of anything (I occasionally collaborate online with people using OneNote, but that is literally the extent of my use of MS products these days). But don't lump me in with the "not trusted on the Mac" (tiny) crowd of zealots who are completely out of touch with reality (a big problem on this forum and other corners of the Mac-sphere). Microsoft was one of the first developers for the Mac, brought Office to the Mac years before they even could bring it elsewhere (because they hadn't finished their pathetic patchwork copy of macOS called Windows yet), and -- yes, in exchange for Apple dropping a lawsuit they might well have won over said copying -- stood by the company with a vote of confidence in Apple's darkest days.

    I know some people here will be covering their ears (er, eyes) and yelling LALALALALA, but in point of fact Microsoft products for Mac work very well (frankly I think the present iOS version of Office is the best software they've ever done, and I was a fan of the legend that was Word 5.1 back in the Floppy Era). They integrate extremely well with Apple's system. They're not Adobe-like port jobs, they are full Mac programs (even OneDrive works perfectly with Macs). They're as legit as any dev this side of Apple themselves, and better than a lot of Mac devs, and that's the truth.

    My friends in Apple-centric retail tell me that Office 365 for Mac still sells extremely well (one of the few pieces of "boxed" software still offered in stores) -- and is indeed one of the top and first things customers buy alongside a new Mac, because many of them are either a) used to it or b) need to work with Windows people and believe that the best option for that is Office (and they are correct in that assumption). MS even makes high-quality keyboards and mice specifically for Mac users, ffs.

    I find that Apple and third-party software fits my needs more than adequately so I don't need or desire MS products, but it's not because they suck. Microsoft is Apple's main ally on privacy in the fight against Google/Twitter/FB (the real enemies you lot should be directing your ire towards), and they make perfectly good stuff. Just like Adobe, but I don't use any of their products anymore either (out of a lack of need; no other reason).

    Believe it or not, this isn't a zero-sum game. To quote Saint Steve, "we have to let go of this notion that for Apple to win, Microsoft has to lose." There's more than a few of you that need to pull your head out of your 1990s-era butt and take a look around ... things have changed a lot, in all directions.
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