Adobe Fresco painting app for iPad boasts accurate AI-powered brushes

Posted:
in iPad
Adobe has provided more information about an upcoming drawing and painting app it is developing for the iPad for release later in 2019, including replacing its 'Project Gemini' name with a proper release title -- Adobe Fresco.




First teased by the company in October 2018 under the "Project Gemini" monicker, Adobe Fresco is an artistic creation app that can be used for drawing and painting, rather than for design work. Built for the iPad and for use with the Apple Pencil, with other platforms to follow, the app aims to offer an accurate painting and drawing experience to the tablet.

Key to the app is Live Brushes, which uses Adobe Sensei's artificial intelligence to recreate the behavior of oils and watercolors. For example, a watercolor Live Brush will show color bloom, blending of colors at a border, and the painting of just water allowing for colors to dilute and mix on the page.






An oil Live Brush will show ridges and brush strokes with thick coats, with colors also able to swirl together. Photoshop brushes can also be imported to Fresco, while thousands are also being offered, created by digital brush maker Kyle Webster.

There are also vector brushes for clean lines and scalable shapes, the ability to create brushes using Adobe Capture, and Photoshop-style tools including masking, layers, and selections. Artworks can also be moved between other Adobe apps, and even exported as PDF for editing within Adobe Illustrator.

Adobe has not advised exactly when Fresco will be available to use, but it is currently undergoing pre-release testing. The company hopes to pitch it towards a "broad spectrum of seasoned to novice artists," and that "anyone with the right hardware will be able to draw and paint in Fresco for free."

«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    wlymwlym Posts: 95member
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    larz2112repressthisralphieGG1
  • Reply 2 of 22
    So obviously this is a reaction to Procreate on the iPad. Adobe rarely moves first, they usually react. But the examples they are showing don't look all that captivating, do they?
    I'm trying to understand why this is: 1-only an ipad app, 2-has taken so long, 3-when they say 'professional level' does it support print resolutions or is this for on-screen only art production/production flows? I know a few illustrators who have done kid books on iPads. But for me, Photoshop still allows for the best paths in the process of getting work to art directors, making changes and dealing with trim size changes ETC. So is Fresco a 'doodle' app and perhaps for on-screen only art or not?

      BTW I draw for a living, using Photoshop every day for illustrations for books and animation dev.

    repressthis
  • Reply 3 of 22
    techsavytechsavy Posts: 34member
    It looks like a good idea, it will have to see if adobe can launch this program without too many errors and bugs.
  • Reply 4 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,412member
    I have no connection to this developer, but I will again mention the terrific painting and drawing app called “Art Set”, which has some very convincing oil and watercolor painting effects.
  • Reply 5 of 22
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 730member
    Procreate appears, from these examples at least, to do more. Plus you won’t have to pay the monthly Adobe tax.
    larz2112repressthis
  • Reply 6 of 22
    LoneStar88LoneStar88 Posts: 289member
    Thanks so much, boys, for perpetuating the anti-Adobe bias!!

    BTW, you may have missed the last two words of the article: ". . .for free."
    fastasleep
  • Reply 7 of 22
    larz2112larz2112 Posts: 288member
    Thanks so much, boys, for perpetuating the anti-Adobe bias!!

    BTW, you may have missed the last two words of the article: ". . .for free."
    My guess is that the free version will only allow you to work at screen resolution (72-96 dpi), and the 'professional level' (read paid) version will allow you to create at much higher, print-level resolutions. Just my guess.
  • Reply 8 of 22
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 703member
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    In other words, same adobe of 20 years ago.
  • Reply 9 of 22
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 280member
    I've been waiting to see when this will be released. Looks amazing.
  • Reply 10 of 22
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,313member
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    mac_dog said:
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    In other words, same adobe of 20 years ago.
    Like Apple, Adobe has managed to survive the slings and arrows of the know-nothing naysayers that infest the internet. Fancy that.
    qwweraquakerotis
  • Reply 11 of 22
    qwweraqwwera Posts: 280member
    lkrupp said:
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    mac_dog said:
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    In other words, same adobe of 20 years ago.
    Like Apple, Adobe has managed to survive the slings and arrows of the know-nothing naysayers that infest the internet. Fancy that.
    Yep. I like the ios alternatives a lot. And perhaps Adobe doesn't want to lose momentum to them, but Photoshop and Illustrator are amazing. And I can't wait to get my hands on Fresco.
  • Reply 12 of 22
    LoneStar88LoneStar88 Posts: 289member
    lkrupp said:
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    mac_dog said:
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    In other words, same adobe of 20 years ago.
    Like Apple, Adobe has managed to survive the slings and arrows of the know-nothing naysayers that infest the internet. Fancy that.
    Astounding how any company can survive by charging money and expecting its customers to pay for its products!! Clever how subscription business models rather ensure that they actually do!
  • Reply 13 of 22
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    I have been using Photoshop for a long time, at least all they way back to version 2, so I have seen my fair share of Adobes apps over the years and their associated costs. Everyone would like apps to be free, and like I always enjoys saying “if it’s free, it’s for me, and I’ll take three” Leaving aside the talk of bugs, app bloat, confusing app ecosystem and a host of lots of other valid-complaints, I am currently paying a discounted rate $32 bucks a month, which provides access to their full suite of apps (including Mac & iOS), Betas, previous stable versions,huge font library, and cloud storage. Of all the software companies that now offer a subscription instead of a purchase, Adobe is the only company where I feel that I am getting a great deal. I always have access to the lastest version of Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, Premier, Fonts, etc on 2 Macs and my iOS devices If I divide every Adobe/Font that I use by the $32 I pay monthly- it’s $1-2 per apps a month ! I am looking forward to trying this new app and I am patiently waiting for beta access on the IPad Version of Photoshop. If any one wants to be purchase some vintage Adobe Apps on Diskette and CD‘s, I may try to recoup some money by posting them to EBay.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 14 of 22
    dedgeckodedgecko Posts: 116member
    As a modest Procreate user, but envious of the many masters of Procreate, nothing here is blowing up my skirt. What’s the draw here, no pun intended?
  • Reply 15 of 22
    And where is the promised Adobe Photoshop for iPad Pro? Long overdue!
  • Reply 16 of 22
    dedgecko said:
    As a modest Procreate user, but envious of the many masters of Procreate, nothing here is blowing up my skirt. What’s the draw here, no pun intended?
    Dunno...seems to be marketed towards people that aren't aware that simulating different types of media has been around forever. Art Rage isn't a new program and it has always touted the watercolor and oil simulation aspect.
    DAalseth
  • Reply 17 of 22
    maccadmaccad Posts: 85member
    wlym said:
    I wonder if it will follow the current Adobe CC model: Release full of bugs, charge expensive subscription, ignore bug reports, add feature-bloat, ignore bug reports, shove Adobe Stock down users' throats, update with same old bugs and add NEW bugs, profit!
    It says "FREE" in the article!
    fastasleep
  • Reply 18 of 22
    maccadmaccad Posts: 85member
    So obviously this is a reaction to Procreate on the iPad. Adobe rarely moves first, they usually react. But the examples they are showing don't look all that captivating, do they?
    I'm trying to understand why this is: 1-only an ipad app, 2-has taken so long, 3-when they say 'professional level' does it support print resolutions or is this for on-screen only art production/production flows? I know a few illustrators who have done kid books on iPads. But for me, Photoshop still allows for the best paths in the process of getting work to art directors, making changes and dealing with trim size changes ETC. So is Fresco a 'doodle' app and perhaps for on-screen only art or not?

      BTW I draw for a living, using Photoshop every day for illustrations for books and animation dev.

    "Rarely moves first, they usually react." Where have I seen this method before? I think it was a very big company. Maybe Adobe is on to something. Why only iPad? Probably same reason as Procreate--something to do with the Apple Pencil. It says it will export PDFs and work with other Adobe apps. It looks like a good addition to Creative Cloud.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 19 of 22
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,285member
    You all keep using that term. It doesn’t mean what you think it means.

    Does nobody actually understand or respect the actual meaning of the term “Artificial Intelligence”?? None of the millions of things that have had that term casually thrown at it are actual AI!!

    But hey, let’s just keep using and diluting the meaning of a thing just because people think it’s cool and exciting. That’s how we get to the future early, right? Make-believe??
  • Reply 20 of 22
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,671member
    I don’t have a dog in this hunt anymore, but I find it amusing to a very high degree that the same forum commenters who think they know what “pro user” means (and believe it has a single uniform meaning) also think that $50/month for the full suite of Adobe stuff is “expensive.” If you can’t cover the cost of that in a single billable hour, you’re certainly not a “pro” — and likely don’t need the software in the first place, given the great number of worthwhile alternatives available to you.

    Back when Adobe’s stuff was non-subscription, our company shelled out $1,900 for the CS Production Suite every two years and/or major version per station. I invite readers to do the math on that versus $600/year today for two stations (can’t be used at the same time, but damn handy for those of us with a workstation and also a laptop).
    fastasleep
Sign In or Register to comment.