New 'Shot on iPhone' experiment video focuses on water imagery

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in iPhone
Apple has moved on to its third iteration of "Shot on iPhone Experiments" video series, with the latest "Cascade" focusing on imagery of water flowing in a variety of different ways, all taken with the iPhone XS' rear camera.




Lasting just under two minutes in length, the video published to Apple's official YouTube channel showcases the various ways water can be manipulated, both physically and with light. Water is shown to flow in slow and normal motion in many ways, including shots from underwater as well as drops, splashes, whirling tunnels of water, laminar flow streams, and refractive sprays.

Shot vertically, the video is credited to Donghoon Jun and Hames Thornton of Incite, in collaboration with WET. The clips are accompanied by the track "Watercolors" by mmph.






As is customary with many of its commissioned Shot on iPhone videos, Apple has also published a behind the scenes video to show how some of the shots were taken. While some images were elaborately set up, such as targeted droplets falling from a pipe to 3D-printed tools creating sheets of water, others used far more low-tech means, including swirling a soda bottle around.






The "Cascade" video is the third in a series of "Experiments" videos in the Shot on iPhone campaign. In January, 32 iPhone XRs mounted to a 360-degree bullet-time rig filmed practical effects involving fire, water, and dry ice, again produced by Jun and Thornton.

The first, from September 2018, showed how professional photographers used the iPhone XS to capture video of water droplets bouncing on a hydrophobic material attached to a speaker, silver nitrate "growing" on wound copper wires, fire and steel wool shots, an ink blot and clay ball solar system scene, and planet-like surfaces using soap, water, and corn syrup.
applesnoranges

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 721member
    This series is very cool, and gives me some great ideas.
  • Reply 2 of 9
    Why was this video only playing at the 480 size and 1080?
  • Reply 3 of 9
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,850member
    Imagine how much better it would have looked filmed in landscape rather than portrait.
    9secondkox2
  • Reply 4 of 9
    steven n.steven n. Posts: 1,123member
    entropys said:
    Imagine how much better it would have looked filmed in landscape rather than portrait.
    Not as effective to the target audience IMO. It is pretentious to assume landscape is the only valid orientation for video.

    I found each arrangement in this video to be compositionally engaging. 
    bb-15
  • Reply 5 of 9
    entropys said:
    Imagine how much better it would have looked filmed in landscape rather than portrait.
    True. 

    Human eyes are set side to side and designed to see in landscape. It’s why the 16:9 and wider ratios have become so popular. 

    The only reason or excuse for portrait video isceither its intended destination (i.e. Instagram stories) or to be different for the sake of being different. 

    Mostly it’s to cater to a false idea that vertical is the way to hold your phone, so you shoot in vertical. In reality, it’s just laziness. 

    I always have my creative team shoot twice. Once in landscape for most of our destinations and then in portrait for one or two others. It’s worked out really well. 

    Go go ahead and hold the phone in landscape when taking photos and videos, just like you do when gaming or using various other apps. 

    Id love to see these in landscape orientation.

    The vertical thing was interesting for 6 months when Instagram did its thing, but is played out now. 
    edited June 23 StrangeDaysfastasleepshewy
  • Reply 6 of 9
    bb-15bb-15 Posts: 268member
    steven n. said:
    entropys said:
    Imagine how much better it would have looked filmed in landscape rather than portrait.
    Not as effective to the target audience IMO. It is pretentious to assume landscape is the only valid orientation for video.

    I found each arrangement in this video to be compositionally engaging. 
    Agreed. In art & photography, many compelling images which have landscapes can be done in a portrait frame format.
    For instance
    View of Toledo by El Greco and
    Wanderer above the Sea of Fog by Casper David Friedrich. 
    The reason the portrait frame is effective in these famous paintings is because there is an important vertical element in the composition.

    This vertical composition element idea is also in several shots/parts of the video “Experiments III: Cascade”. Vertical movement is a predominant theme. And that can be effectively framed in portrait.   
  • Reply 7 of 9
    LatkoLatko Posts: 398member
    “Shot on iPhone” => merely translates into under-lighted, brown, indiscernable detailed photography for the herds that Tim addresses, sadly.
  • Reply 8 of 9
    Is there an iPhone camera feature or an app that allows you to take shots both ways simultaneously so that you can choose which one you like?
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