Apple Stores start selling One Drop blood glucose monitors

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 27
Apple has commenced sales of the One Drop blood glucose monitor in a small number of its retail outlets, bringing the Health app-compatible diabetes management device to its physical stores for the first time.




The One Drop is a compact blood glucose monitor that works with the iOS Health app and the Apple Watch. Connecting by Bluetooth, the device draws a small amount of blood to measure the user's blood glucose level, which is then recorded in the Health app for tracking over time.

Currently sold via the online Apple Store, CNBC reports the One Drop is being offered in a selection of brick-and-mortar Apple Stores. In both locations, the kit is being sold for $69.95, with store purchases also including a year of free coaching from a certified diabetes educator via the One Drop app.

The One Drop is not the first product of its kind to be sold by Apple in its stores. Previously the iBGStar meter was carried, but sales ceased after Apple switched from legacy 30-pin connectors to Lightning.

The addition of the device to stores may be a way for Apple to offer diabetes management to its customers before it can develop its own product. Apple was rumored to be previously testing a prototype of a blood sugar monitor, and has applied for patents for non-invasive glucose monitoring, which could feasibly be used on the Apple Watch to expand its capabilities.

One Drop's sale is also another indicator Apple is keen on pressing further into the healthcare space, on top of its existing work with the Apple Watch. Analysts suggest Apple is aiming to make a consumer-centric ecosystem for healthcare devices and services, which could help it take part of the $3.5 trillion healthcare industry.

In May, Apple reportedly acquired Tueo Health, a startup developing asthma-tracking technology, specifically for use by sleeping kids. Apple also used WWDC to reveal new features relating to hearing health in HealthKit.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    e500e500 Posts: 7member
    This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit?
    mwhiteRichieDuncanravnorodom
  • Reply 2 of 19
    mwhitemwhite Posts: 208member
    Not until they have a watch that check's blood glucose, I will stick with what I have because Medicare pays for all my products.
  • Reply 3 of 19
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,166member
    e500 said:
    This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit?
    What are you talking about?
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 4 of 19
    kenaustuskenaustus Posts: 911member
    $70 is a bit pricy when compared to standard units,  That market is basically like the razor market - the companies sell razors cheap and make money off the blades.  With blood monitoring the test strips are the money maker.

    Against this option is the Continuous Glucose Monitoring that tests the blood every 5 or so minutes and sends the results to the monitor/iPhone.  The Medicare approved version I'm looking at (iDexcom G5) requires a baseline stick once a day.  The next version needs no finger sticks.  Both provide a far more aggressive  monitoring  than finger sticks so the key is going to be insurance reimbursement t.
    n2itivguy
  • Reply 5 of 19
    WIth Dexcom, Minimed, and Freestyle all offering Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Apple devices communicating with them, I think the days of fingersticks are starting to come to an end.

    Also, is OneDrop the subscription BG testing service, or was I thinking of another one?  If it isn't, then people should know that Blood Testing suppliers will happily give you the meter, and make up for it on the back end with test strips.
  • Reply 6 of 19
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,664unconfirmed, member
    Wishful thinking:

    Apple is testing the market with customer research before releasing a glucose reading Apple Watch later this year.....
  • Reply 7 of 19
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 400member
    e500 said:
    This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit?
    I think the second sentence in the article explains it pretty well:
    The One Drop is a compact blood glucose monitor that works with the iOS Health app and the Apple Watch. 

  • Reply 8 of 19
    A couple of points about proprietary blood glucose systems:

    1. The One Drop lancets (the pointy things that poke your finger) are clumsy and a pain in the butt to use, imho. They cost about 15¢/lancet.
    2. The Accu-Chek Fastclix Lancing device and Lancets are easy to use, imho. They cost about 7¢/lancet.
    3. The One Drop test strips run about 50¢/strip. The going rate for Amazon's generic "Choice" test strips is about 17¢/strip.
    4. Amazon's generic "Choice" meter ($24) also supports Bluetooth and HealthKit.

    Do the math. At 2 to 4 tests per day it really adds up.
    FileMakerFellerfastasleepn2itivguy
  • Reply 9 of 19
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,615member
    e500 said:
    This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit?
    I think the non invasive route is not likely to happen for a very long time, if at all. If you are going to offer a way of measuring blood glucose it has to be accurate and reliable. Current CGM system are barely adequate and do not measure blood directly but instead the interstitial fluid just under the skin. These devices also relies on an iPhone to go get readings over bluetooth. If Apple wanted to disrupt and dramatically increase that market they should turn it upside down by developing (or buy) a cgm sensor that is smaller than what is currently on the market and sell it a low cost. Currently prices are way too high for people who self finance, or for people who's insurance won't cover it for whatever reason. Then Apple should let the only device required for getting readings from the sensor be the Apple Watch - so no iPhone required. But of course, to get the benefits of Apple Health and deeper recording and glucose analysis an iPhone or iPad would be required. See? Every Type 2 diabetic as well as a lot of health oriented, or nutrition oriented people would go for this. I am not sure what a company like Dexcom charges per month, but the price is too high. 
    See? The girls and boys in Cupertino NEED me :smiley: 
  • Reply 10 of 19
    e500 said:
    "This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit." One Drop Fingerpick test could be just a place holder for Apple to show that Apple watch can display glucose readings. But now most people use either Dexcom G6 ( if they can afford, no fingerprick for calibration), Dexcom G5( Expensive, fingerprick required for calibration) or Abbott's FreeStyle Libre sensor with the Ambrosia's NightRider transmitter( about 65% cheaper than Dexcom G6 with same functionality)  for continuous glucose monitoring. I heard Dexcom is expecting to have direct connect with Apple watch( no phone) to display glucose readings, this will be a huge step for people with active lifestyle and young kids as parents will be able to monitor glucose levels when kid is away from them. Seems Ambrosia also posted a video of FreeStyle Libre sensor with NightRider showing a direct connect to Apple watch.


    edited June 27
  • Reply 11 of 19
    The last I looked in order for Medicare to cover CGM such as the DexCom, you have to document that you have been doing 4 finger sticks a day.  This is doable for type 1s (only 5 - 10% of all diabetics), but would be rare for type 2s.

    Last I looked Medicare only approves $10.50 for a vial of 50 strips and only to low bid suppliers.

    Who knows for sure the initial cost and then ongoing monthly cost for DexCom, Abbott Libra, and Medtronic
  • Reply 12 of 19
    @Paxman... You don't know what you're talking about; "Current CGM system are barely adequate and do not measure blood directly but instead the interstitial fluid just under the skin." Unless you currently use a CGM daily, how do you know if they're "barely adequate" or anything at all about Type 1 Diabetes care? I do depend on one and I can assure anyone reading this they're as accurate as traditional meter testing.
    Leave it to the Cult of Apple to try and pass something off as new and innovative that's been around for the last 40 yrs, and charge an over inflated price. The price of this shiny new meter, is the copay for a 6 mo supply of strips. Oh and my old non shiny meter, synchs up to both mine and my doc's computers so we can both see and monitor my bld sugars.
    Typical iOS user, and why on earth would I want an Apple watch let alone an iPhone?
    Long Live Android✊✊✊
    RichieDuncan
  • Reply 13 of 19
    The One Drop system is way overpriced. I get Reli-On Prime at Walmart... 100 strips for $17.88, 100 lancets is only $1.56.

    The One Drop app isn't bad. It will log your readings, carbs and calories, meds, and other health statistics like weight and blood pressure. I prefer mySugr as it has more direct data entry and much better reports. My doctor loves the detail. 
  • Reply 14 of 19
    The last I looked in order for Medicare to cover CGM such as the DexCom, you have to document that you have been doing 4 finger sticks a day.  This is doable for type 1s (only 5 - 10% of all diabetics), but would be rare for type 2s.

    Last I looked Medicare only approves $10.50 for a vial of 50 strips and only to low bid suppliers.

    Who knows for sure the initial cost and then ongoing monthly cost for DexCom, Abbott Libra, and Medtronic
    As a Type 2, myself, I should be pricking 6*/day, so doable to qualify for CGM. 
  • Reply 15 of 19
    RazoreRazore Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    kenaustus said:
    $70 is a bit pricy when compared to standard units,  That market is basically like the razor market - the companies sell razors cheap and make money off the blades.  With blood monitoring the test strips are the money maker.

    Against this option is the Continuous Glucose Monitoring that tests the blood every 5 or so minutes and sends the results to the monitor/iPhone.  The Medicare approved version I'm looking at (iDexcom G5) requires a baseline stick once a day.  The next version needs no finger sticks.  Both provide a far more aggressive  monitoring  than finger sticks so the key is going to be insurance reimbursement t.

    edited June 28
  • Reply 16 of 19
    RazoreRazore Posts: 2unconfirmed, member
    I am a type 2d.
    We are more worried about how to lower our blood glucose count than monitoring it every second.
    With my excperience for about 15 years going through this unreversable disease , during those 15 yrs. I have purchased the blood g. monitors only 2 times . I found out that the best posible way would be to measure blood G.(A1c homoglubin  ) every 3 to 4 months with help of an endocrinologist specialist so it can put your mind at ease.
    edited June 28
  • Reply 17 of 19
    A couple of points about proprietary blood glucose systems:

    1. The One Drop lancets (the pointy things that poke your finger) are clumsy and a pain in the butt to use, imho. They cost about 15¢/lancet.
    2. The Accu-Chek Fastclix Lancing device and Lancets are easy to use, imho. They cost about 7¢/lancet.
    3. The One Drop test strips run about 50¢/strip. The going rate for Amazon's generic "Choice" test strips is about 17¢/strip.
    4. Amazon's generic "Choice" meter ($24) also supports Bluetooth and HealthKit.

    Do the math. At 2 to 4 tests per day it really adds up.
    So, at $0.15 per lancet, that's about $0.45 - $0.60 per year when testing 6x/day, as I used to.  (inside diabetic joke, where we have 'lancet change day' a few times a year)
    #1 - If they're a pain in the butt, you should see a neurologist, or use the side of your finger instead.
    #2 - Love that lancing device
    #3 - Yep, they give the meters away, but hit you with the $.05 (their cost) test strips at around a buck apiece.  I'm glad Amazon is putting pressure on the test strip companies.  I hope they start making insulin too.
    #4 - Pretty much all of the name brand (insurance covered) BG meters support bluetooth and Healthkit, OneTouch, Bayer, etc.  The store brands just need to catch up.

    I'll stick with the Dexcom that measures my BG 288 times a day, and lasts 10 days.

  • Reply 18 of 19
    paxman said:
    e500 said:
    This tells me Apple's quest for the "holy grail" non-invasive monitoring is farther off than originally thought. Otherwise why would they be selling this kit?
    I think the non invasive route is not likely to happen for a very long time, if at all. If you are going to offer a way of measuring blood glucose it has to be accurate and reliable. Current CGM system are barely adequate and do not measure blood directly but instead the interstitial fluid just under the skin. These devices also relies on an iPhone to go get readings over bluetooth. If Apple wanted to disrupt and dramatically increase that market they should turn it upside down by developing (or buy) a cgm sensor that is smaller than what is currently on the market and sell it a low cost. Currently prices are way too high for people who self finance, or for people who's insurance won't cover it for whatever reason. Then Apple should let the only device required for getting readings from the sensor be the Apple Watch - so no iPhone required. But of course, to get the benefits of Apple Health and deeper recording and glucose analysis an iPhone or iPad would be required. See? Every Type 2 diabetic as well as a lot of health oriented, or nutrition oriented people would go for this. I am not sure what a company like Dexcom charges per month, but the price is too high. 
    See? The girls and boys in Cupertino NEED me :smiley: 
    If Apple bought a CGM company, with Apple's track record, do you really think it would be less expensive than Dexcom, Minimed, or Frestyle?

    (Jony Ive voice*)  "We looked at the Continuous Glucose Monitoring and asked ourselves, how can we make this thinner, lighter, and faster?   We flattened it, and made it so flexible that it is like a piece of skin, and uses Bluetooth 6.0 to get the data to your Apple Watch at 1/1000 the 0.03 seconds it takes with other Continuous Glucose Monitoring systems, has a range so if you leave your iPhone at home, it will call you at work to tell you your blood sugar, and it anticipates where you will move next and dynamically flex to make sure that it does not cause any discomfort whatsoever.  Using the Find Friends app, you can find your sensor when it is not attached to your body.  Using the Qi charger will power the transmitter for 90 days, making it truly a bargain at $2999 for the transmitter and $495 for each 10 day sensor.  We put our hearts and pancreases into this invention, and this will revolutionize your blood sugar management."

    *Yeah, I know he's out the door now...
  • Reply 19 of 19


    Who knows for sure the initial cost and then ongoing monthly cost for DexCom, Abbott Libra, and Medtronic
    Without insurance, it's about $2400 for two Dexcom Transmitters and 9 Sensors, a 90 Day supply.  The receiver is $350.

    Check Costco's Pharmacy Plan, as they have some killer deals on the transmitters and sensors if you're in it.
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