Apple seemingly stops sales of 'Designed by Apple in California' photo book

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 21
After nearly three years in print, Apple appears to have halted sales of "Designed by Apple in California," a massive photo book that chronicles 20 years of the company's iconic consumer electronic designs.




While a dedicated "Designed by Apple in California" mini-site remains live on Apple's servers, links to purchase the book from Apple's online storefront are no longer active.

Conducting a search in the Apple Store app for iOS yields similar results. Entering the title's first few letters auto-fills the search text box with what appears to be a valid entry under the "Products" category, but executing the query yields only a list of Apple-designed accessories.

The apparent halt to sales arrives some two months after stock began to dwindle. A Reddit thread in late June noted large versions of the book were sold out with no estimated return date.

Considering time on market and demand, Apple potentially ceased production of the book earlier this year or in 2018.

An ode to Apple's industrial design team, "Designed by Apple in California" debuted in 2016 in two sizes -- a $200 small version and a $300 large format copy -- both of which contained 450 high-quality photographs of classic and contemporary devices. Going beyond simple hero shots, the hardbound book featured photos of products in various states of construction and, in some cases, deconstruction.





The work of Chief Design Officer Jony Ive, who presented the book in an accompanying Apple-produced video, is on display throughout. In fact, when Ive announced his coming departure in June, pundits commented that "Designed by Apple in California" was effectively a well-produced portfolio of his efforts at the company.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,764member
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    macplusplusJWSCwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 26
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 549member
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    So, you’re not actually going to open it eh?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 26
    racerhomie3racerhomie3 Posts: 1,166member
    I want this book. Somewhere inside my future collection.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    I want this book. Somewhere inside my future collection.
    I donated all my paper books (over 1000) to the local library about a decade ago.  Right after purchasing the original iPad (preordered)...

    By the 3rd version, printing photos was a thing of the past (archaic)...

    Now buying physical copies of movies seems silly...

    I guess my question is... Why?


    DAalsethspice-boy
  • Reply 5 of 26
    Doing a run of these kinds of photo books is typical of design labels. Although it always felt a little artificial for Apple since the function of these books are to demonstrate the brands' design language by showing their radical and less known "thin end of the wedge" designs.
    Apple's designs have predominantly been for the mass market, meaning there is little need to produce a book since the designs and design language are already well documented, known and celebrated.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 26
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    Lecture...
     
    There’s more to life than money; learned this a long time ago. Likely the real reason most of us want collector sets and items—fear. Sure, we all fantasise about a car boot sale antique find, or our fifteen minutes on The Antiques Roadshow with the Native American blanket from Grandad’s attic—everyone loves a good underdog story. The reality is this book is at best a $300 or $400 profit maker while taking up valuable home-space and headspace for decades to come. My advice, live a little; give a little: take the same amount of money and buy gifts for the people you know and love they’ll appreciate right now. Life’s too short. Saving this book, wrapped in the attic for what it could be worth decades from now is in my opinion, a sad legacy.

    By all means it’s your money. Do what you will. Just do so consciously.
    edited August 22 uraharaavon b7jcs2305
  • Reply 7 of 26
    Still available on the UK store
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 26
    Huh. I never knew this existed or that I wanted it until now.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 26
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 763member
    This felt like a vanity project by Ive. Another sign his interest was moving away from Apple and on to his personal projects.
    razorpit
  • Reply 10 of 26
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,060member
    My problem with modern books is it appears book makers forgot the art of making a good book. I'm not talking about the content of the book, I'm talking about the quality of materials.

    Going to the library or ordering online, it seems like new books start falling apart almost immediately. It doesn't matter if it is a kids book, or one of the new "The Art of {insert movie title here}". They are flat out garbage. I wouldn't purchase this book just because of that alone.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    I want this book. Somewhere inside my future collection.
    I donated all my paper books (over 1000) to the local library about a decade ago.  Right after purchasing the original iPad (preordered)...

    By the 3rd version, printing photos was a thing of the past (archaic)...

    Now buying physical copies of movies seems silly...

    I guess my question is... Why?


    I stopped buying paper books after the first iPad came out too. Within 2 years had gone back to buying paper books (best reading experience). 

    I also stopped printing pictures but started printing them again. Nice to be able to have them around your living space instead of crammed into a device. 

    I still purchase physical films as well. I only buy classics that I’ll want to watch more than a few times and I have a couple of vacation spots (Portugal & Cape Breton) with almost non existent internet. 

    It might seem “archaic” but frankly that’s condescending. 
    zroger73razorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 26
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,331member
    I want this book. Somewhere inside my future collection.
    I donated all my paper books (over 1000) to the local library about a decade ago.  Right after purchasing the original iPad (preordered)...

    By the 3rd version, printing photos was a thing of the past (archaic)...

    Now buying physical copies of movies seems silly...

    I guess my question is... Why?
    The question should be: Why do you think your preferred option is the only one people should use?

    People buy books for a large variety of reasons. From collecting, to displaying, as investments, knowing that their digital copy won't be removed silently because some secret deal with a publisher has ended or the ebook store closes down, to the. experience itself.

    I try to limit to my physical books and yet this Summer I've bought physical books for studying simply because I prefer it. I also bought a physical logbook when there are excellent digital iPad OS options. Of course, not having an iPad would mean that my flight logbook would be hundreds of dollars, not $10, but even if I had an iPad I was still going to buy the physical logbook so I can have it as a memento of my first 40 hours of flying.
    StrangeDayspscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,764member
    JWSC said:
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    So, you’re not actually going to open it eh?
    Yes I've opened it, and enjoyed it. The book comes in a protective box that folds open and shut. It remains in perfect condition; should my family decide to let it go they won't have any trouble. 
    edited August 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,764member

    ireland said:
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    Lecture...
     
    There’s more to life than money; learned this a long time ago. Likely the real reason most of us want collector sets and items—fear. Sure, we all fantasise about a car boot sale antique find, or our fifteen minutes on The Antiques Roadshow with the Native American blanket from Grandad’s attic—everyone loves a good underdog story. The reality is this book is at best a $300 or $400 profit maker while taking up valuable home-space and headspace for decades to come. My advice, live a little; give a little: take the same amount of money and buy gifts for the people you know and love they’ll appreciate right now. Life’s too short. Saving this book, wrapped in the attic for what it could be worth decades from now is in my opinion, a sad legacy.

    By all means it’s your money. Do what you will. Just do so consciously.
    Who said anything about an attic? Why do you think we have a study with our collection of books?

    Do you likewise lecture collectors of baseball cards? Comics? Classic film posters? Any fucking collectable of interest other than your own? Etc... 
    edited August 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,764member

    razorpit said:
    My problem with modern books is it appears book makers forgot the art of making a good book. I'm not talking about the content of the book, I'm talking about the quality of materials.

    Going to the library or ordering online, it seems like new books start falling apart almost immediately. It doesn't matter if it is a kids book, or one of the new "The Art of {insert movie title here}". They are flat out garbage. I wouldn't purchase this book just because of that alone.
    Then you'd be pretty ignorant of how this book was put together. There were many articles at the time, look them up.

    Or, just keep believing it's the same as a Twilight novel. Shrug.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,764member

    I want this book. Somewhere inside my future collection.
    I donated all my paper books (over 1000) to the local library about a decade ago.  Right after purchasing the original iPad (preordered)...

    By the 3rd version, printing photos was a thing of the past (archaic)...

    Now buying physical copies of movies seems silly...

    I guess my question is... Why?


    I stopped buying paper books after the first iPad came out too. Within 2 years had gone back to buying paper books (best reading experience). 

    I also stopped printing pictures but started printing them again. Nice to be able to have them around your living space instead of crammed into a device. 

    I still purchase physical films as well. I only buy classics that I’ll want to watch more than a few times and I have a couple of vacation spots (Portugal & Cape Breton) with almost non existent internet. 

    It might seem “archaic” but frankly that’s condescending. 
    What happens to all your "books" when you die? Which of your friends and family get which parts of you, to enjoy and keep close and remember? Oh, that's right, none. Even if they had transferrable licenses, there is less appeal to a folder of e-books.

    In our home, our bookshelves are a major focal point and expression of what we enjoy and value. We love sharing that with loved ones.
    edited August 22 watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 26
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,060member

    razorpit said:
    My problem with modern books is it appears book makers forgot the art of making a good book. I'm not talking about the content of the book, I'm talking about the quality of materials.

    Going to the library or ordering online, it seems like new books start falling apart almost immediately. It doesn't matter if it is a kids book, or one of the new "The Art of {insert movie title here}". They are flat out garbage. I wouldn't purchase this book just because of that alone.
    Then you'd be pretty ignorant of how this book was put together. There were many articles at the time, look them up.

    Or, just keep believing it's the same as a Twilight novel. Shrug.
    Looks like someone needs a smoke break.

    Look pal, the book industry did this to themselves. It isn't my fault I need to research how each book was made to figure out if it's worth purchasing a physical copy or not.
  • Reply 18 of 26
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 85member
    ireland said:
    Excellent, collector’s edition scarcity has begun...Got the large, still in box. 
    Lecture...
     
    There’s more to life than money; learned this a long time ago. Likely the real reason most of us want collector sets and items—fear. Sure, we all fantasise about a car boot sale antique find, or our fifteen minutes on The Antiques Roadshow with the Native American blanket from Grandad’s attic—everyone loves a good underdog story. The reality is this book is at best a $300 or $400 profit maker while taking up valuable home-space and headspace for decades to come. My advice, live a little; give a little: take the same amount of money and buy gifts for the people you know and love they’ll appreciate right now. Life’s too short. Saving this book, wrapped in the attic for what it could be worth decades from now is in my opinion, a sad legacy.

    By all means it’s your money. Do what you will. Just do so consciously.
    Wow! Just wow. 
    pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 26
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 85member
    It is possible that they print a second edition containing all the products that have been released in the interim. Does anyone else see a chance of that happening?
    razorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 26
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,664unconfirmed, member
    Called it years ago when iKnockoff morons claimed it was "too expensive". Now expect this investment to double in the coming years and quadruple after that.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.