Review: Apple Card is more of an experience than a reward generator

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 51
    The review misses one very important fact: Apple Card is only available in the US, with neither Goldman Sachs nor Apple has yet disclosed when or if it will be available in other countries.
  • Reply 22 of 51
    I’ve had a couple of times when I tried to use the Apple Card on a contactless credit card machine that I’ve used with Apple Pay previously and it gets denied. Then when I use the physical card it goes through fine. Anyone know why this happens or has had the same issue?
  • Reply 23 of 51
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,529member
    Fatman said:
    The article is unclear/ not correct  
    The article is perfectly clear and correct. You are stating what the article already said. A lot of people don't understand that Apple Pay and Apple Card are two different things.  The article said 2% for Apple Pay. That means a site that accepts Apple Pay or a store with an NFC reader that accepts Apple Pay. Any other use of the card – swiping the physical card or using the Wallet information for an online purchase that doesn't take Apple Pay gets you 1%. The article is correct.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.

    stevefromstatefarm said:
    I received the physical Apple Card in the mail, but unless the wallet app notifies you that the card has shipped, you cannot activate your physical AppleCard.
    I wonder why you'd activated the card before it ships? Once approved, I immediately made the virtual card my primary Apple Pay card and was able to use it. When I got the physical card I activated it and it works fine. But I'd never consider trying to activate it before it actually arrived.

    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I'm with you 100%, but it looks like that's the only way to pay off the card. There is a slim chance that you can use your bank's Bill Pay to send them a payment. I'm trying that, hoping that it works. Otherwise I'll have to link my bank before the end of the month.

    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    ACH transaction isn't the issue. It's having G-S (or anybody, for that matter) pulling money from your account instead of your bank doling money out as you direct. Linked to your account, is there anything to stop G-S from literally taking money out of your account, akin to a gym debiting your account for their monthly payments?
    GeorgeBMacgatorguy
  • Reply 24 of 51
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,529member
    steveau said:
    The review misses one very important fact: Apple Card is only available in the US, with neither Goldman Sachs nor Apple has yet disclosed when or if it will be available in other countries.
    That's not important at all. Maybe Apple and G-S will offer it outside the US, maybe not. It's not as though Apple said it will be available outside the US.

  • Reply 25 of 51
    citpeks said:
    zorinlynx said:
    I wish US retailers would get their act together and accept NFC universally. Some companies have absurd selfish reasons for not accepting it, like wanting people to use their own apps or other non-standard methods of payment. It would be nice if the big payment networks like MC and Visa would start mandating NFC support by a certain date, so stores would have no choice but to join this decade.
    The card associations have had a series of mandates, started in 2015, but the penalties are relatively minor, so many merchants have ignored them.

    Another problem is that the migration has been couched as a competitive feature in the marketplace, and not as a upgrade of industry standards.  Apple Pay vs. Samsung Pay, vs. Google Pay vs. Walmart/CurrentC/MCX, etc.

    The U.S. is woefully behind the rest of the world, where NFC terminals are widespread, and a contactless payment is just a contactless payment.  The consumer just needs to see one symbol, and that's it, not a test to see which ecosytem one belongs to.

    Ultimately, the industry had a chance to take a big step, and blew it, much of it by design (it also passed on chip-and-PIN).
    True!
    The analogy is:   Merchants were pushed into upgrading to accept chip cards because they were on the hook for fraudulent charges if they didn't.
    There has been no such incentive to activate ApplePay or other NFC technologies.   Their only incentive was for the safety and convenience of their customer.   And, that worked out well for me because it made it obvious which merchants valued me and me business and which didn't.  So, for the past several years I avoid shopping at anyplace that does not accept ApplePay -- if they don't care about me, why should I shop there?   That would be silly.
  • Reply 26 of 51
    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    Same here.
    So, my plan -- verified by ApplePay support but never tested -- is to transfer money from my bank to AppleCash using my debit card.   Then pay the AppleCard bill from AppleCash.

    I'm sure some might argue that there is no difference between using a debit card or linking a bank account.   But, Debit Cards have more protections.  ACH transactions were designed for speed and efficiency businesses and customer safeguards tend to be lower.
  • Reply 27 of 51
    Yes, I agree...  More than anything it is the experience that separates it from the crowd
    And, for me, that is the almost entirely online / iPhone based nature of the card -- and that comes out clearly when it comes time to pay the bill:

    They don't mail you a statement and neither do you mail them a check.
    It all happens on you iPhone:   
    Tap on "total balance" and you see your a list of your statements with an option to generate a PDF in standard statement format.
    When it comes time to pay, you simply transfer funds from your linked bank account or AppleCash with your iPhone.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.

    I suspect we will be seeing a lot more of this 100% online & mobile in the future.

    And, as an aside:   I just got an email from Discover encouraging me to use my card via ApplePay wherever I shop.
    I do all that with my current credit cards as well. 
    The difference is:  WIth AppleCard the choice has been taken away from you.  It's 100% online and ONLY online.   No mailed statements.   No mailed checks.
    edited September 2
  • Reply 28 of 51
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I just scheduled my full bill to be paid from my bank account on September 30 but I couldn't see where I can automatically pay my bill each month. I also downloaded my August statement PDF and sent it to my e-mail address. From my inbox, I downloaded it to my desktop, and I finally sent it to Evernote. I have a slightly complicated system, but it works for me.
    I called customer service from the Card app and they suggested allowing 3-4 days for funds to be withdrawn from your bank account.
    Yeh, I do the same when having my bank pay my current credit card accounts:  I schedule it 2 days before the due date (plus allowances for weekends and holidays) just to be sure it gets processed on or before the due date.

    And, in fact, my bank does that for me on automatic payments I have scheduled.  For instance:  I have them send my gas company $85 on the first of each month.  But, if the first falls on a weekend or holiday they automatically adjust the date to the last business day prior to that.

    It's silly to absorb interest and fees simply because a payment couldn't be processed in time.
  • Reply 29 of 51
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    No, while both use ACH they are not the same.   In one, a 3rd party stores your banking information on their servers and, the transaction takes place at their discretion.   Having your bank send it does not expose you to the same (possible) abuses.

    For example:   Years ago I had many of my monthly bills paid by the utility pulling the money from my account via ACH.  When I planned on moving, it took months to shut that off -- several simply ignored me or made it very difficult to maneuver their systems to stop it and so, they just kept pulling the funds.  It was a painful experience that I vowed I would never repeat.

    When you enable a merchant to pull your funds from your bank you not only expose your banking info on their servers but you put them in charge.
  • Reply 30 of 51
    danvdr said:
    I’ve had a couple of times when I tried to use the Apple Card on a contactless credit card machine that I’ve used with Apple Pay previously and it gets denied. Then when I use the physical card it goes through fine. Anyone know why this happens or has had the same issue?
    I used to have the same issue with my Discover card at several merchants.   But all have fixed their systems since.  I never figured out why and when I asked the merchant they condescendingly assumed it was me using a bad card.
  • Reply 31 of 51
    macgui said:

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.


    Umm, I was told by Apple Support that using AppleCash would work -- but it was clear that he was a rookie and using logic that "it should work" rather than explicit knowledge of the matter.  But, from all I have seen, it seems to me that it should work too.

    I wonder if the problem was that the money you transferred to AppleCash had not physically cleared yet?   Perhaps it might work if you gave it couple days to clear?

    I think I will run a test with a small preliminary payment rather than wait till the end of the month when the full bill is due.

    THANKS FOR THE HEADS UP!
  • Reply 32 of 51
    macgui said:
    Fatman said:
    The article is unclear/ not correct  
    The article is perfectly clear and correct. You are stating what the article already said. A lot of people don't understand that Apple Pay and Apple Card are two different things.  The article said 2% for Apple Pay. That means a site that accepts Apple Pay or a store with an NFC reader that accepts Apple Pay. Any other use of the card – swiping the physical card or using the Wallet information for an online purchase that doesn't take Apple Pay gets you 1%. The article is correct.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.

    stevefromstatefarm said:
    I received the physical Apple Card in the mail, but unless the wallet app notifies you that the card has shipped, you cannot activate your physical AppleCard.
    I wonder why you'd activated the card before it ships? Once approved, I immediately made the virtual card my primary Apple Pay card and was able to use it. When I got the physical card I activated it and it works fine. But I'd never consider trying to activate it before it actually arrived.

    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I'm with you 100%, but it looks like that's the only way to pay off the card. There is a slim chance that you can use your bank's Bill Pay to send them a payment. I'm trying that, hoping that it works. Otherwise I'll have to link my bank before the end of the month.

    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    ACH transaction isn't the issue. It's having G-S (or anybody, for that matter) pulling money from your account instead of your bank doling money out as you direct. Linked to your account, is there anything to stop G-S from literally taking money out of your account, akin to a gym debiting your account for their monthly payments?
    If us my understanding that you set the amount to send to G-S, whether it is partial or full payment. You can send payment manually or set up a specific date to send automatically. I don’t know if they can pull from your account automatically? Good luck if they try with me since I have a specific account just for this type of use. nothing in account till I transfer $ for ACH transactions. This could be simplified if Apple had its isn’t bank, iBank LOL.
  • Reply 33 of 51
    macgui said:
    Fatman said:
    The article is unclear/ not correct  
    The article is perfectly clear and correct. You are stating what the article already said. A lot of people don't understand that Apple Pay and Apple Card are two different things.  The article said 2% for Apple Pay. That means a site that accepts Apple Pay or a store with an NFC reader that accepts Apple Pay. Any other use of the card – swiping the physical card or using the Wallet information for an online purchase that doesn't take Apple Pay gets you 1%. The article is correct.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.

    stevefromstatefarm said:
    I received the physical Apple Card in the mail, but unless the wallet app notifies you that the card has shipped, you cannot activate your physical AppleCard.
    I wonder why you'd activated the card before it ships? Once approved, I immediately made the virtual card my primary Apple Pay card and was able to use it. When I got the physical card I activated it and it works fine. But I'd never consider trying to activate it before it actually arrived.

    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I'm with you 100%, but it looks like that's the only way to pay off the card. There is a slim chance that you can use your bank's Bill Pay to send them a payment. I'm trying that, hoping that it works. Otherwise I'll have to link my bank before the end of the month.

    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    ACH transaction isn't the issue. It's having G-S (or anybody, for that matter) pulling money from your account instead of your bank doling money out as you direct. Linked to your account, is there anything to stop G-S from literally taking money out of your account, akin to a gym debiting your account for their monthly payments?
    I understand people not trusting the system but G-S states they do not pull money from your account. The reason for the linked bank account is so you can transfer the money to them. Currently this is the only mechanism to pay your bill.
    pscooter63
  • Reply 34 of 51
    robjnrobjn Posts: 248member
    “Any colored materials that frequently come in contact with it will inevitably stain the finish —and yes, that includes denim or leather.”

    It is not true that staining is “inevitable” from “any colored materials” .

    Leather and denim are fabrics that take strong dyes. The laundry instructions on a pair in dark jeans may tell you to “wash separately”. In reality they might be covering themselves or it might only be a problem for the first few washes. The vast majority of jeans are 100% color fast.

    Apple’s support document is just covering them against a somewhat unlikely possibility.


  • Reply 35 of 51
    I must confess, I'm a little impatient  It's been over a week since I was issued an Apple Card, but while my physical card was ordered at the same time, and I received confirmation in my Wallet, it still hasn't shipped... checking daily. 

    Around that same time, I ordered a replacement card for another account, and it arrived in less than a week. 

    I wonder what the holdup is?  Anyone else experiencing delays?
  • Reply 36 of 51
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    macgui said:
    Fatman said:
    The article is unclear/ not correct  
    The article is perfectly clear and correct. You are stating what the article already said. A lot of people don't understand that Apple Pay and Apple Card are two different things.  The article said 2% for Apple Pay. That means a site that accepts Apple Pay or a store with an NFC reader that accepts Apple Pay. Any other use of the card – swiping the physical card or using the Wallet information for an online purchase that doesn't take Apple Pay gets you 1%. The article is correct.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.

    stevefromstatefarm said:
    I received the physical Apple Card in the mail, but unless the wallet app notifies you that the card has shipped, you cannot activate your physical AppleCard.
    I wonder why you'd activated the card before it ships? Once approved, I immediately made the virtual card my primary Apple Pay card and was able to use it. When I got the physical card I activated it and it works fine. But I'd never consider trying to activate it before it actually arrived.

    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I'm with you 100%, but it looks like that's the only way to pay off the card. There is a slim chance that you can use your bank's Bill Pay to send them a payment. I'm trying that, hoping that it works. Otherwise I'll have to link my bank before the end of the month.

    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    ACH transaction isn't the issue. It's having G-S (or anybody, for that matter) pulling money from your account instead of your bank doling money out as you direct. Linked to your account, is there anything to stop G-S from literally taking money out of your account, akin to a gym debiting your account for their monthly payments?
    I understand people not trusting the system but G-S states they do not pull money from your account. The reason for the linked bank account is so you can transfer the money to them. Currently this is the only mechanism to pay your bill.
    Of course they are pulling money from your account!   Theoretically, and hopefully with your permission.   But it is nevertheless them pulling the money out of your account.

    The analogy is:   Giving a company a book of signed blank checks and then later telling them how much to fill in for the amount and when to cash each check.
    You may feel that is OK and safe because you trust Goldman.   But what happens if they get hacked or a disgruntled employee needs a long vacation somewhere south of the border? 

    Yes, it's safe 99.99% of the time.  But... I am no more likely to give any entity ACH access to my accounts than I am to give them a book of signed, blank checks -- particularly if there is nothing in it for me.   Actually, thinking about it:  You are safer giving them the book of signed blank checks than you are ACH access to your accounts because checks take longer to process and can have stop-payments put on them.  
  • Reply 37 of 51
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    macgui said:
    Fatman said:
    The article is unclear/ not correct  
    The article is perfectly clear and correct. You are stating what the article already said. A lot of people don't understand that Apple Pay and Apple Card are two different things.  The article said 2% for Apple Pay. That means a site that accepts Apple Pay or a store with an NFC reader that accepts Apple Pay. Any other use of the card – swiping the physical card or using the Wallet information for an online purchase that doesn't take Apple Pay gets you 1%. The article is correct.

    Or, for myself, since I don't want to link my bank account, I'll transfer money to AppleCash using my bank's debit card and use that to pay the bill.
    Not possible, as far as I could tell. I would rather not let G-S dip into my bank account, but I believe a bank must be linked to the card in order to pay it. I put money from my debit card into Apple Cash but when I pressed Pay Now I got 'Transaction Not Completed' every time. Some website showed that linked to a bank, you then have the option of paying from Apple Cash by pushing a button. So I it looks like I'll have to live with G-S's mitts (I won't schedule a payment; zero balance as always) or link the card, pay the balance, and drop the card.

    stevefromstatefarm said:
    I received the physical Apple Card in the mail, but unless the wallet app notifies you that the card has shipped, you cannot activate your physical AppleCard.
    I wonder why you'd activated the card before it ships? Once approved, I immediately made the virtual card my primary Apple Pay card and was able to use it. When I got the physical card I activated it and it works fine. But I'd never consider trying to activate it before it actually arrived.

    plovell said:
    I'm not sure I like the idea of linking Apple Card to my bank account. I would prefer to pay directly FROM my bank, rather than having Goldman Sachs PULL money from my account.
    I'm with you 100%, but it looks like that's the only way to pay off the card. There is a slim chance that you can use your bank's Bill Pay to send them a payment. I'm trying that, hoping that it works. Otherwise I'll have to link my bank before the end of the month.

    iOS_Guy80 said:
    I agree but either way you or your bank are initiating payment from your account by ACH transaction. 
    ACH transaction isn't the issue. It's having G-S (or anybody, for that matter) pulling money from your account instead of your bank doling money out as you direct. Linked to your account, is there anything to stop G-S from literally taking money out of your account, akin to a gym debiting your account for their monthly payments?
    I understand people not trusting the system but G-S states they do not pull money from your account. The reason for the linked bank account is so you can transfer the money to them. Currently this is the only mechanism to pay your bill.
    Actually, that is you giving them permission to pull money from your account.  There is no way for an individual to initiate an ACH transaction.
    edited September 2
  • Reply 38 of 51
    steveau said:
    The review misses one very important fact: Apple Card is only available in the US, with neither Goldman Sachs nor Apple has yet disclosed when or if it will be available in other countries.
    Appleinsider had addressed this a while ago: https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/03/26/apple-card-will-roll-out-to-additional-countries-after-us-launch
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 39 of 51
    M68000M68000 Posts: 130member
    citpeks said:
    zorinlynx said:
    I wish US retailers would get their act together and accept NFC universally. Some companies have absurd selfish reasons for not accepting it, like wanting people to use their own apps or other non-standard methods of payment. It would be nice if the big payment networks like MC and Visa would start mandating NFC support by a certain date, so stores would have no choice but to join this decade.
    The card associations have had a series of mandates, started in 2015, but the penalties are relatively minor, so many merchants have ignored them.

    Another problem is that the migration has been couched as a competitive feature in the marketplace, and not as a upgrade of industry standards.  Apple Pay vs. Samsung Pay, vs. Google Pay vs. Walmart/CurrentC/MCX, etc.

    The U.S. is woefully behind the rest of the world, where NFC terminals are widespread, and a contactless payment is just a contactless payment.  The consumer just needs to see one symbol, and that's it, not a test to see which ecosytem one belongs to.

    Ultimately, the industry had a chance to take a big step, and blew it, much of it by design (it also passed on chip-and-PIN).
    True!
    The analogy is:   Merchants were pushed into upgrading to accept chip cards because they were on the hook for fraudulent charges if they didn't.
    There has been no such incentive to activate ApplePay or other NFC technologies.   Their only incentive was for the safety and convenience of their customer.   And, that worked out well for me because it made it obvious which merchants valued me and me business and which didn't.  So, for the past several years I avoid shopping at anyplace that does not accept ApplePay -- if they don't care about me, why should I shop there?   That would be silly.
    George,  so you avoid shopping anyplace that does not accept ApplePay ???!!!!    Why do you choose to limit yourself that way?  I can assure you that whether a merchant has ApplePay or not has absolutely nothing to do with how they value customers.
    gatorguy
  • Reply 40 of 51
    M68000 said:
    citpeks said:
    zorinlynx said:
    I wish US retailers would get their act together and accept NFC universally. Some companies have absurd selfish reasons for not accepting it, like wanting people to use their own apps or other non-standard methods of payment. It would be nice if the big payment networks like MC and Visa would start mandating NFC support by a certain date, so stores would have no choice but to join this decade.
    The card associations have had a series of mandates, started in 2015, but the penalties are relatively minor, so many merchants have ignored them.

    Another problem is that the migration has been couched as a competitive feature in the marketplace, and not as a upgrade of industry standards.  Apple Pay vs. Samsung Pay, vs. Google Pay vs. Walmart/CurrentC/MCX, etc.

    The U.S. is woefully behind the rest of the world, where NFC terminals are widespread, and a contactless payment is just a contactless payment.  The consumer just needs to see one symbol, and that's it, not a test to see which ecosytem one belongs to.

    Ultimately, the industry had a chance to take a big step, and blew it, much of it by design (it also passed on chip-and-PIN).
    True!
    The analogy is:   Merchants were pushed into upgrading to accept chip cards because they were on the hook for fraudulent charges if they didn't.
    There has been no such incentive to activate ApplePay or other NFC technologies.   Their only incentive was for the safety and convenience of their customer.   And, that worked out well for me because it made it obvious which merchants valued me and me business and which didn't.  So, for the past several years I avoid shopping at anyplace that does not accept ApplePay -- if they don't care about me, why should I shop there?   That would be silly.
    George,  so you avoid shopping anyplace that does not accept ApplePay ???!!!!    Why do you choose to limit yourself that way?  I can assure you that whether a merchant has ApplePay or not has absolutely nothing to do with how they value customers.
    In my experience, I have not found that to be true.
    Plus, as I have mentioned previously/eslewhere, after having a card hacked, my credit card company recommended I use ApplePay instead of their chip card because it is more secure.
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