Italy plans 'web tax' on Apple and all digital firms

Posted:
in General Discussion
The Italian government is reportedly preparing a tax on digital companies as part of its national budget for 2020. It's due to take effect from January and through a self-assessment system will levy a 3% tax on online transactions.

Apple's store in Milan, Italy (Source: Apple)
Apple's store in Milan, Italy (Source: Apple)


Italy is reportedly planning to introduce its delayed plans for a "web tax" on digital companies conducting business within the region. The new 3% tax is intended both to combat what the government sees as too-lax taxation laws, and to provide an income that will help it to avoid increasing general sales taxes.

According to Reuters, the plan, due to begin in January, will require multinational web-based firms to pay a 3% levy on internet transactions.

The companies would be required to self-assess the amount of tax they owe, though the Italian government would also retain the right to check any accounts.

In a similar plan to the pan-European one which the Organization for Economic Cooperation (OECD) is proposing, the new tax would apply to firms worth more than $827 million and earning more than $6.1 million euros in Italy.

Italy's new coalition government is believed to expect that this tax will bring in approximately $662 million annually. A similar plan was proposed by the previous coalition government, which collapsed before implementing it.

This new scheme will arrive in time to alleviate a sales tax increase which is also due to start in January.

Reuters says that Italy will present its new draft budget to the European Union by October 15. And that if the OECD plans are successful, Italy will adjust its own taxation plans to match.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,435member
    If I'm reading this right, this should help local retail stores by avoiding a further 3% sales tax? I wonder if 3% is enough to curb the appeal of ease of delivery.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,673member
    Will this be in addition to a tax the EU would levy? 3% is fine and the companies will simply pass it on to the purchaser. 
  • Reply 3 of 12
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    emig647 said:
    If I'm reading this right, this should help local retail stores by avoiding a further 3% sales tax? I wonder if 3% is enough to curb the appeal of ease of delivery.
    It sounds like it. I don't think it would sway me for most items, but it might sway enough people.

    PS: I had this idea a couple decades ago and it did not go over well.
  • Reply 4 of 12
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 914member
    Soli said: PS: I had this idea a couple decades ago and it did not go over well.
    Yeah, me too, but I collapsed before implementing it. 
  • Reply 5 of 12
    Once upon a time taxes were minimal. Then we accepted larger government and the taxes which come with that. We get used to them and then even stop caring very much that large government services are wasteful and inefficient. We’ll pay to avoid the responsibility ourselves.

    So when something like this comes up we think of positive ways it can be seen, rather than just inefficient government bloat that will, guaranteed, get bigger and bigger with higher and higher taxes (in the long term). And then it will become too difficult to change away from our approach to government because it’s so large, and so it will become worse and worse.
    lkruppalphafoxredraider11longpathJanNLentropyscat52
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Gotta love governments. They can’t produce anything themselves so they instead just pass a law that forces you to give them more money. Must be nice. 
    cat52cornchipkestral
  • Reply 7 of 12
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,031member
    Gotta love governments. They can’t produce anything themselves so they instead just pass a law that forces you to give them more money. Must be nice. 
    Huh? Governments have been responsible for countless innovations.

  • Reply 8 of 12
    dougddougd Posts: 292member
    The world is tax crazy. Collecting money to do their dirty deeds
    cat52kestral
  • Reply 9 of 12
    firms worth more than $827 million and earning more than $6.1 million euros in Italy. 


    Which is it euros € or dollars $?


    827 million and 6.1 million are weirdly specific instead of a rounded amounts. I guess there was some nice statistical curve involved making these limits. 

  • Reply 10 of 12
    thrangthrang Posts: 895member
    Don't web transactions already collect sales/VAT taxes for in-country sales?
    cat52
  • Reply 11 of 12
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,828member
    nadriel said:
    firms worth more than $827 million and earning more than $6.1 million euros in Italy. 


    Which is it euros € or dollars $?


    827 million and 6.1 million are weirdly specific instead of a rounded amounts. I guess there was some nice statistical curve involved making these limits. 

    As mentioned in another thread by someone else, $827m looks a lot like €750m.  The 6.1m I have less idea about, if it's dollars then it's about €5.5m, which appears to be no better.
    edited October 2019
  • Reply 12 of 12
    It seems no one of the posters has any idea about BEPS. 
    European governments wants taxes paid BY COMPANIES.
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