Apple's 2019 holiday ad uses iPad to bring families together

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple has released its 2019 holiday ad "The Surprise" to YouTube, highlighting how the iPad can ease holiday and travel tensions, and to bring families together after a tough year.




The three-minute long ad spot highlights how a little thoughtfulness and creativity can help ease holiday tensions and heal the heart in difficult times.





The ad, titled "The Surprise", shows a family as they travel with their young daughters to their grandparent's home for the holidays. Throughout the journey, the children bicker, but at every point are presented with an iPad to assuage the tension between the sisters.

Upon arrival at the grandparent's home, it's soon learned that the grandmother passed away sometime in the last year. The implication is that the grandfather has been struggling with the loss, acting aloof and snapping at the children when they act up. The father quells the situation by offering the iPad at every turn, giving the girls something to distract themselves with.

The granddaughters later go through the grandfather's collection of home movies. Upon discovering a video of their then-young grandparents, they begin to come up with an idea to help their grandfather feel better.

On Christmas morning, the girls present their grandfather with a digital scrapbook that includes videos of him and his wife, ending on the sentiment that even though the grandmother is gone, the family is still together for the holidays.

The ad emphasizes the iPads ability to bridge generations together-- both the granddaughters and grandfather are able to intuitively use the iPad. Additionally, it highlights a positive way tech can bring a family together, a rare sentiment in an era of screen time-obsessed advertisements.

The video features a song called "Married Life" by Michael Giacchino, and the description points the viewer to the Apple page for the iPad.

Last year's holiday ad was animated and focused on building emotional attachment with the Apple brand, rather than selling a specific product.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    Ugh!!!! Spare me!!! This is literally just like the Christmas Ad playing Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas where the kid who wouldn’t get off his phone and in the end it was like, “Oh look, he made a movie.” 

    Also, “Hey kids, if I give you the iPad will you be quiet?” “Yes Dad!” “Ok, here you go and make sure not to interact with anyone and stare at this mind numbing device.”
    raulcristianmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 2 of 19
    Ugh!!!! Spare me!!! This is literally just like the Christmas Ad playing Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas where the kid who wouldn’t get off his phone and in the end it was like, “Oh look, he made a movie.” 

    Also, “Hey kids, if I give you the iPad will you be quiet?” “Yes Dad!” “Ok, here you go and make sure not to interact with anyone and stare at this mind numbing device.”
    Clearly you don’t have creative children in your life. /smh
    edited November 2019
  • Reply 3 of 19
    dedgecko said:
    Ugh!!!! Spare me!!! This is literally just like the Christmas Ad playing Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas where the kid who wouldn’t get off his phone and in the end it was like, “Oh look, he made a movie.” 

    Also, “Hey kids, if I give you the iPad will you be quiet?” “Yes Dad!” “Ok, here you go and make sure not to interact with anyone and stare at this mind numbing device.”
    Clearly you don’t have creative children in your life. /smh
    I do but they’re not glued to iPads, iPhones, MacBooks etc.... 24/7 unlike the youth of today which cannot be without technology for 2 minutes without going totally insane. It’s sad, pathetic and completely ridiculous. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 4 of 19
    Damn ninja cutting onion
    bageljoeyStrangeDays
  • Reply 5 of 19
    Yikes.

    This ad is actually... disturbing.

    Rather than disciple the kids to love each other, tolerate the other and even PREFER one above ones own self, it's almost like they were provided a drug to pacify them. Over and over.  Not a good look. 

    And the little thing they made with their drug of choice doesn't justify the selfishness running rampant with the parents' blessing. Letting kids who don't know any better run things until they get their way isn't what parents should be doing. Take the time to talk to your kids so that they understand why what they are doing is wrong and point them in a better direction. It's called investing in them and it takes time and effort. Not just give them a distraction and hope for the best. 

    Commercialism at its finest. 
    edited November 2019 tomjunior39muthuk_vanalingamStrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 19

     Additionally, it highlights a positive way tech can bring a family together, a rare sentiment in an era of screen time-obsessed advertisements.
    Um... this IS a screen-time obsessed ad. 
  • Reply 7 of 19
    Yikes.

    This ad is actually... disturbing.

    Rather than disciple the kids to love each other, tolerate the other and even PREFER one above ones own self, it's almost like they were provided a drug to pacify them. Over and over.  Not a good look. 

    And the little thing they made with their drug of choice doesn't justify the selfishness running rampant with the parents' blessing. Letting kids who don't know any better run things until they get their way isn't what parents should be doing. Take the time to talk to your kids so that they understand why what they are doing is wrong and point them in a better direction. It's called investing in them and it takes time and effort. Not just give them a distraction and hope for the best. 

    Commercialism at its finest. 
    The ad is fine. Apple does not have business to educate parents what they should or shouldn't do, Apple is in business to sell more iPads. For that, this ad is excellent. It shows the benefit of tech in bringing family together.

    As for your point, everyone I know already use iPad to keep their kids occupied. It doesn't mean they don't sit with them and talk, but it's an effective temporary solution when you need to drive, or when you are in public place such as on the plane where kids' cry need to be settled as quick as possible.
  • Reply 8 of 19
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 19
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,827member
    I was watching a local news story about parents that proactively limit screen time for their children. A little slip of the tongue that escaped editing was one mom saying something to the effect that although they try to limit screen time, “sometimes we just need a break.” So yeah, current parents do use devices to distract their offspring, just like previous generations of parents used television. No big deal.
  • Reply 10 of 19
    An amazing number of grinches posting today....

    I liked it.
  • Reply 11 of 19
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,937member
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 19
    bageljoey said:
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    Fine then Apple can put Happy Holidays at the end of the ad right before the Apple logo is shown. In the 2013 ad (which is so much better than this one) the song being played in the background is Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas. In that ad when the grandfather hugged the grandson as they were getting out of the car the grandson said Merry Christmas. Saying that is not being insensitive to people who don’t celebrate Christmas. And I’ll bet any money those people aren’t the ones that are offended. It’s the college educated woke crowd obsessed with being PC.

    I noticed that 2013 ad was 1:30. This ad is like 3 minutes. It’s too long and not nearly as good.
    edited November 2019
  • Reply 13 of 19
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 851member
    bageljoey said:
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    Good for you. 

    It’s cultural appropriation, pure and simple. Using an obvious Christian celebration to peddle your goods and then insulting those whose culture you borrow from by wishing them “Happy Holidays” is brazen and insensitive. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    By the way, I’m neither religious nor liberal, I just enjoy throwing the “culture appropriation” accusation at hypocritical libs who love to shame the rest of us with their PC bullshit.

    Anyway, the commercial was long and annoying. I hope we wont be seeing it every 5 minutes like last year’s. 
    edited November 2019
  • Reply 14 of 19
    Gives a very good sign that in these times parents give technology like we give sweets in the past to keep them silent.

    I see this every day in many family’s, kids are glued to their devices even when dining with the family.

    Where is the social contact?
    Very very sad!

    I guess it’s a sign of the times...On social level very sad...
    tomjunior39
  • Reply 15 of 19
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    Nor is there anything wrong with admitting the December cultural event we call Christmas is the latest version of old Roman and pagan winter solstice holidays (Saturnalia, Yule, Mithra, etc) repurposed over the years as new supernatural stories were invented. Thankfully they kept the merry making and gift giving parts of the ancient tradition.
    edited November 2019
  • Reply 16 of 19

    bageljoey said:
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    Fine then Apple can put Happy Holidays at the end of the ad right before the Apple logo is shown. In the 2013 ad (which is so much better than this one) the song being played in the background is Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas. In that ad when the grandfather hugged the grandson as they were getting out of the car the grandson said Merry Christmas. Saying that is not being insensitive to people who don’t celebrate Christmas. And I’ll bet any money those people aren’t the ones that are offended. It’s the college educated woke crowd obsessed with being PC.

    I noticed that 2013 ad was 1:30. This ad is like 3 minutes. It’s too long and not nearly as good.
    So as proof of their being PC you cite they....weren’t PC last time. Unless you think Apple has gone PC in 6 years? Hmm. Yeah. 
  • Reply 17 of 19

    Japhey said:
    bageljoey said:
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    Good for you. 

    It’s cultural appropriation, pure and simple. Using an obvious Christian celebration to peddle your goods and then insulting those whose culture you borrow from by wishing them “Happy Holidays” is brazen and insensitive. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    By the way, I’m neither religious nor liberal, I just enjoy throwing the “culture appropriation” accusation at hypocritical libs who love to shame the rest of us with their PC bullshit.

    Anyway, the commercial was long and annoying. I hope we wont be seeing it every 5 minutes like last year’s. 
    It’s not cultural appropriation nor is what we call christmas a christian invention. Saturnalia and other pagan cults had winter solstice celebrations with many of the traditions appropriated by the christians (yule-tide, wreathes, mistletoe, caroling, etc), then a competing cult rising in popularity. 

    https://wearyourvoicemag.com/entertainment-culture/christmas-pagan-roots-winter-holiday

    Christmas is a cultural event, and it’s a very old one, much older than the latest religion to claim it. 
  • Reply 18 of 19
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 851member

    Japhey said:
    bageljoey said:
    The holiday in question is clearly Christmas yet the kids say happy holidays to the grandparents instead of merry Christmas? Why do US companies have to be so politically correct. There’s nothing wrong with saying Merry Christmas. 
    They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    I celebrate Christmas myself, but if I’m greeting someone of unknown religious preference I default to “Happy Holidays” as a common courtesy.
    I don’t see a friendly greeting as an occasion to push for religious hegemony...
    Good for you. 

    It’s cultural appropriation, pure and simple. Using an obvious Christian celebration to peddle your goods and then insulting those whose culture you borrow from by wishing them “Happy Holidays” is brazen and insensitive. Is that a hard concept to understand?

    By the way, I’m neither religious nor liberal, I just enjoy throwing the “culture appropriation” accusation at hypocritical libs who love to shame the rest of us with their PC bullshit.

    Anyway, the commercial was long and annoying. I hope we wont be seeing it every 5 minutes like last year’s. 
    It’s not cultural appropriation nor is what we call christmas a christian invention. Saturnalia and other pagan cults had winter solstice celebrations with many of the traditions appropriated by the christians (yule-tide, wreathes, mistletoe, caroling, etc), then a competing cult rising in popularity. 

    https://wearyourvoicemag.com/entertainment-culture/christmas-pagan-roots-winter-holiday

    Christmas is a cultural event, and it’s a very old one, much older than the latest religion to claim it. 
    Historically, everything you’re saying is true. But my original post was in response to the statement:  

    “They were celebrating Christmas in the ad, but Apple is selling their stuff to everyone—people who celebrate Christmas and those who don’t. Is that a hard concept to understand?”

    How is not cultural appropriation to use a religious holiday as an excuse to sell more product to people who don’t adhere to that faith? It’s practically the text book definition of the term, regardless of said religion’s origin story. 

    I do find irony, however, with the idea that the Christians appropriated the holiday from the pagans before capitalists did it to them. But it wasn’t the point I was trying to make. 
  • Reply 19 of 19
    I’m just really irritated because they put Pixar music in the ad.

    it just reminded me of Up. 

    Thought it was cheesy of them to do that. 
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