Apple, Ellen DeGeneres outfit D.C. school with new Macs, every student gets an iPad

Posted:
in General Discussion edited December 2019
Continuing corporate efforts to support at-risk youth, Apple this week joined forces with talk show host Ellen DeGeneres and former first lady Michelle Obama to hand out new Macs and iPads to students and teachers at Randle Highlands Elementary School in Washington, D.C.



Part of Degeneres' "Ellen's Greatest Night of Giveaways," Apple's contribution included communal iMac desktops and iPads with Logitech Crayons, MacBooks for teachers and an iPad for every current student.

Obama visited Randle on Tuesday, where Principle Kristie Edwards offered a campus tour and detailed the school's needs. Located in what is considered one of the roughest neighborhoods of D.C., 65% of Randle's student body are either in foster care or homeless, Edwards said. According to demographics provided on the Randle Elementary website, all students in attendance are considered economically disadvantaged.

While the grounds are clean and classrooms well kept, Randle, like many other schools in the U.S., is unable to equip its students with the latest in learning technology. With only a handful of laptops and PCs, Randle's computer lab is small and students are forced to work in groups due to an obvious lack of equipment. Many teachers reportedly dip into their own pockets to buy tools and other items not furnished by the District of Columbia Public Schools system.

It was at the computer lab that Obama surprised Edwards and a group of children with $100,000 in cash, a gift from DeGeneres to cover institutional expenses.

Later in the day, students gathered for an impromptu assembly where Obama announced Randle would receive a new basketball court and a massive update to its computer lab, which will soon be full of Apple products.

Channeling late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, Obama announced "one more thing," saying, "This one is for the students. We want to make sure you all can learn and explore on your own, too. So we're giving the school enough iPads for every single one of you students."

Youngsters dressed as elves carted in wagons full of brand new iPads, handing them out to outreached arms and smiling faces.

"I am so grateful to @MichelleObama and Apple for what they did at this school. Wow. Wow. Wow," DeGeneres tweeted.

Apple CEO Tim Cook issued a short statement about the in a tweet on Tuesday.

"Every child deserves the opportunity to create something that can change the world. Proud to join @MichelleObama and @TheEllenShow in empowering our next generation!" Cook said.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    Nice to see Michelle Obama keeping with her message, and helping schools and school children.  Some things are more important than political rhetoric...
    CloudTalkinEsquireCatsGeorgeBMacjony0
  • Reply 2 of 20
    Nice to see Michelle Obama keeping with her message, and helping schools and school children.  Some things are more important than political rhetoric...
    Hopefully she does more helping the needy without press coverage 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 20
    So wheres the funds for this public school district? Cant even buy lab equipments?? 
  • Reply 4 of 20
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    SpamSandwichrazorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 20
    Nice to see people helping needy communities! School institutions funding has been greatly slashed across the country. It would be good that decent software and most importantly training is offered to teachers.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 20
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,114member
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    Well, if they gave the items to the students and not the district then that could be a problem. My wife taught in a socio-economically depressed area. Her principal often provided new winter coats for students in need. A few days later the child showed up in their usual tattered rags. Turns out the parent sold the new coat for drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes. iPads might suffer the same fate. Reality sucks.
    razorpitwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 20
    This is good...  Mostly it raises awareness and sets precedent and direction.

    But, while Michelle was handing out free iPads, most U.S. school districts were buying cheap Chromebooks -- not just because the hardware is cheap but because they enable access to effective educational resources developed by and in conjunction with Google.

    As every iPhone user should know by now:  It is NOT the hardware that makes the difference, its the software that provides the functionality.   Google and its partners have provided cheap hardware along with necessary software and systems to U.S. school districts and the combination of the two makes a low cost but effective system.  

    Apple on the other hand is half pregnant:   They did a good job providing lower cost iPads (still more than a Chromebook though) but have done essentially nothing with educational software and systems.

    Apple needs to equip classrooms with low cost hardware along with the software systems that enable teachers to extend their reach and become more efficient and effective.  So far they only made the hardware available.  But, think about it:  That's like giving somebody an iPhone with no apps.  It's pretty, but essentially worthless.
    anantksundaramCloudTalkin
  • Reply 8 of 20
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,266member
    lkrupp said:
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    Well, if they gave the items to the students and not the district then that could be a problem. My wife taught in a socio-economically depressed area. Her principal often provided new winter coats for students in need. A few days later the child showed up in their usual tattered rags. Turns out the parent sold the new coat for drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes. iPads might suffer the same fate. Reality sucks.
    It's crazy how much anti-poor rhetoric there is.  If someone is begging for change on the street, people will go out of their way to find the one or two cases where someone was faking it and actually wasn't homeless in order to justify not wanting to help at all.  Same situation here where the few cases of abuse become the justification for not helping at all.

    Personally, I'd rather risk a few cases of abuse on the end of the spectrum where people are barely getting by, than risk abuse on the other end of the spectrum where companies lobby governments for tax concessions in the name of job creation/expansion, but often the extra money simply ends up in the pockets of upper management and shareholders who already have more than enough.  The reality of trickle down economics sucks.
    GeorgeBMacronn
  • Reply 9 of 20
    auxio said:
    lkrupp said:
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    Well, if they gave the items to the students and not the district then that could be a problem. My wife taught in a socio-economically depressed area. Her principal often provided new winter coats for students in need. A few days later the child showed up in their usual tattered rags. Turns out the parent sold the new coat for drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes. iPads might suffer the same fate. Reality sucks.
    It's crazy how much anti-poor rhetoric there is.  If someone is begging for change on the street, people will go out of their way to find the one or two cases where someone was faking it and actually wasn't homeless in order to justify not wanting to help at all.  Same situation here where the few cases of abuse become the justification for not helping at all.

    Personally, I'd rather risk a few cases of abuse on the end of the spectrum where people are barely getting by, than risk abuse on the other end of the spectrum where companies lobby governments for tax concessions in the name of job creation/expansion, but often the extra money simply ends up in the pockets of upper management and shareholders who already have more than enough.  The reality of trickle down economics sucks.
    I don't think it's necessarily "anti-poor" to point out that there's a difference between "handing out" something -- often because is assuages a giver's conscience or because it gets some media/celebrity attention -- and getting the receiver to use that something to gain from it in a sustainable, long-term manner.

    The latter is tough stuff.
    razorpit
  • Reply 10 of 20
    auxio said:
    lkrupp said:
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    Well, if they gave the items to the students and not the district then that could be a problem. My wife taught in a socio-economically depressed area. Her principal often provided new winter coats for students in need. A few days later the child showed up in their usual tattered rags. Turns out the parent sold the new coat for drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes. iPads might suffer the same fate. Reality sucks.
    It's crazy how much anti-poor rhetoric there is.  If someone is begging for change on the street, people will go out of their way to find the one or two cases where someone was faking it and actually wasn't homeless in order to justify not wanting to help at all.  Same situation here where the few cases of abuse become the justification for not helping at all.

    Personally, I'd rather risk a few cases of abuse on the end of the spectrum where people are barely getting by, than risk abuse on the other end of the spectrum where companies lobby governments for tax concessions in the name of job creation/expansion, but often the extra money simply ends up in the pockets of upper management and shareholders who already have more than enough.  The reality of trickle down economics sucks.
    I don't think it's necessarily "anti-poor" to point out that there's a difference between "handing out" something -- often because is assuages a giver's conscience or because it gets some media/celebrity attention -- and getting the receiver to use that something to gain from it in a sustainable, long-term manner.

    The latter is tough stuff.

    Yeh, it is anti-poor to search for ways to find fault with any kindness to the poor and disadvantaged.   It is becoming rampant in U.S. society -- and has been legitimized by greedy politicians legitimizing greed.  We are losing our values as a nation and as a world leader.
    ronn
  • Reply 11 of 20
    thttht Posts: 3,942member
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.
  • Reply 12 of 20
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.

    But, largely the software could go beyond specific curriculum and enable the teacher to provide links to external material, attachments, specify assignments and due dates as well as tips for studying for tests ("Review your lab notes!", "Get your flash cards done!").  

    In addition to helping both the teacher and the student it can also help those parents who stay involved in their child's studies. 
    For example:  My grandson tends to be disorganized so often he needs reminders and prompts on which homework assignments are due.  His school has a website where all the Homework for all the classes is posted and updated daily (the postings tend to cover days and weeks ahead for major assignments).  Unfortunately the site is organized by specific class rather than student so to find the homework for my grandson involves scanning through about 10 single spaced pages of website.   So, each day I scan through and update a shared calendar I share with he and his mom so his assignments for each day are posted by day on his calendar.   All he (or mostly she) has to do is look at the calendar to know what is due for the next day as well as major items coming up in the near future.   I probably spend about 20 minutes each day organizing it (tomorrow he has 7 different assignments due plus an early morning study session for his science test!) -- that is something that Apple could easily organize with the proper software -- all the data is there, it just needs organized to be made usable!

    Grade schoolers, middle schoolers and high schoolers are under a lot of pressure and have a LOT of extra work assigned on a daily basis -- staying organized and knowing what to prepare for is vital and automation software could help a great deal with that.

    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    ronn
  • Reply 13 of 20
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 14 of 20
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
    Not sure I’m following you. Are you saying you can’t have common core math and arts, shop, etc.? 
    ronn
  • Reply 16 of 20
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
    Not sure I’m following you. Are you saying you can’t have common core math and arts, shop, etc.? 

    Not that you can't -- but that you don't.   Along with Common Core came an emphasis on the academics emphasized in Common Core which pushed those other, non-academic courses out of the curricula because there simply wasn't time or room for them.  Even Phys-Ed has been  minimized.   You aren't going beat China at technology painting pretty pictures, repairing a car or building a cedar chest.   In my area, any student who wants to do that is forced to transfer to a private technical school while the public schools are all measured by standardized tests through which they not only compete with each other but are measured by the state and, if they don't measure up, the state can intervene.  So, the school and its teachers over-focus on common core subjects and push their students hard.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
    Not sure I’m following you. Are you saying you can’t have common core math and arts, shop, etc.? 

    Not that you can't -- but that you don't.   Along with Common Core came an emphasis on the academics emphasized in Common Core which pushed those other, non-academic courses out of the curricula because there simply wasn't time or room for them.  Even Phys-Ed has been  minimized.   You aren't going beat China at technology painting pretty pictures, repairing a car or building a cedar chest.   In my area, any student who wants to do that is forced to transfer to a private technical school while the public schools are all measured by standardized tests through which they not only compete with each other but are measured by the state and, if they don't measure up, the state can intervene.  So, the school and its teachers over-focus on common core subjects and push their students hard.
    I would disagree in that the one major advantage we have over China is that we do encourage creative thinking. That's not something that is traditionally taught in China. Most of the IP originates from Western world nations while China does an excellent job of manufacturing it to scale, amongst a few other things of which I won't go in to detail.
    ronnSpamSandwich
  • Reply 18 of 20
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
    Not sure I’m following you. Are you saying you can’t have common core math and arts, shop, etc.? 

    Not that you can't -- but that you don't.   Along with Common Core came an emphasis on the academics emphasized in Common Core which pushed those other, non-academic courses out of the curricula because there simply wasn't time or room for them.  Even Phys-Ed has been  minimized.   You aren't going beat China at technology painting pretty pictures, repairing a car or building a cedar chest.   In my area, any student who wants to do that is forced to transfer to a private technical school while the public schools are all measured by standardized tests through which they not only compete with each other but are measured by the state and, if they don't measure up, the state can intervene.  So, the school and its teachers over-focus on common core subjects and push their students hard.
    I would disagree in that the one major advantage we have over China is that we do encourage creative thinking. That's not something that is traditionally taught in China. Most of the IP originates from Western world nations while China does an excellent job of manufacturing it to scale, amongst a few other things of which I won't go in to detail.

    I am not sure how true that IP story (still) is -- certainly, at a minimum, that gap is narrowing if not already closed.   Yeh, we have a few, but so do they -- and increasingly even efficient manufacturing requires sophisticated IP -- it's one of the reasons why Tim Cook is recommending that kids take coding as a second language instead of French.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    auxio said:
    lkrupp said:
    Seems like some holiday-season feel-good stuff... doesn’t ring true, somehow...
    Well, if they gave the items to the students and not the district then that could be a problem. My wife taught in a socio-economically depressed area. Her principal often provided new winter coats for students in need. A few days later the child showed up in their usual tattered rags. Turns out the parent sold the new coat for drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes. iPads might suffer the same fate. Reality sucks.
    It's crazy how much anti-poor rhetoric there is.  If someone is begging for change on the street, people will go out of their way to find the one or two cases where someone was faking it and actually wasn't homeless in order to justify not wanting to help at all.  Same situation here where the few cases of abuse become the justification for not helping at all.

    Personally, I'd rather risk a few cases of abuse on the end of the spectrum where people are barely getting by, than risk abuse on the other end of the spectrum where companies lobby governments for tax concessions in the name of job creation/expansion, but often the extra money simply ends up in the pockets of upper management and shareholders who already have more than enough.  The reality of trickle down economics sucks.
    It's sad that people have been convinced that the poor (as well as immigrants) are the problem with America. The same people hate the idea of government assistance because some may abuse it, but could give two shits about corporate bailouts, tax cuts that benefit the obscenely wealthy, corporate profits that don't make their way to the workers, etc.

    Just sad really.
    GeorgeBMacronntht
  • Reply 20 of 20
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    razorpit said:
    tht said:
    The hardware isn’t enough, or perhaps I should say that making the curriculum material free, along with a free automated grading process, is more important than the hardware in of itself. But a curriculum will be rife with controversy so nobody touches it. Then, there is the handholding and of the students. Not every student cares and they have to be pushed until they care.

    Much of the curriculum has already been set by Common Core:   When I help my grandson with his 7th grade math and he or I don't understand something I just go to Khan Academy (a free web based tutorial funded by Bill Gates and others) and find the video tutorials & exercises for that particular, specific topic.   It matches his classroom curriculum almost exactly -- like 99%.



    The United States stands far behind China in education (#13).   We should be throwing the kitchen sink at it to catch up!
    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/PISA-results_ENGLISH.png

    We are in the early stages of catching up. First to go is Common Core.

    Common Core was first response to dismal findings of how U.S. education compared to that of (mostly) the eastern countries.   It raised the bar here -- but parents mostly hate it -- mostly because it really increases the workload on the student and many parents simply can't do the common core math (as well as the fact it emphasizes academics over things like art, home-ec, shop class, music, etc...).

    But I have not seen a comparison of standard test scores (like the PISA I linked to above) for U.S. students pre- and post- Common Core.   That would be interesting.
    Not sure I’m following you. Are you saying you can’t have common core math and arts, shop, etc.? 

    Not that you can't -- but that you don't.   Along with Common Core came an emphasis on the academics emphasized in Common Core which pushed those other, non-academic courses out of the curricula because there simply wasn't time or room for them.  Even Phys-Ed has been  minimized.   You aren't going beat China at technology painting pretty pictures, repairing a car or building a cedar chest.   In my area, any student who wants to do that is forced to transfer to a private technical school while the public schools are all measured by standardized tests through which they not only compete with each other but are measured by the state and, if they don't measure up, the state can intervene.  So, the school and its teachers over-focus on common core subjects and push their students hard.
    I would disagree in that the one major advantage we have over China is that we do encourage creative thinking. That's not something that is traditionally taught in China. Most of the IP originates from Western world nations while China does an excellent job of manufacturing it to scale, amongst a few other things of which I won't go in to detail.
    You are correct. When I used to go to China on business they were very curious how we would generate product ideas because although individuals there have an outstanding work ethic, they are utterly insulated from the kind of “free-range thinking” which occurs naturally in the US. Engineering precision and cost-cutting are more valuable when approaching products from a manufacturing standpoint and that still dominates the thinking there.
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