Tim Cook announces Apple will donate to coronavirus relief efforts

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2020
Apple will be donating to a variety of groups in China that are helping to fight the outbreak of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

Electron micrograph of coronavirus virions
Electron micrograph of coronavirus virions


Tim Cook tweeted the morning of January 25, honoring the Chinese New Year and announcing that Apple will donate to those who are helping to support those affected by the coronavirus.

As people in China and around the world celebrate the Lunar New Year, we send our love and support to the many impacted by the Coronavirus. Apple will be donating to groups on the ground helping support all of those affected.

-- Tim Cook (@tim_cook)


The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, termed "2019-nCoV" for short, is respiratory illness that is not dissimilar to SARS. Symptoms are typically flu-like, with a fever, cough, and shortness of breath present. Like many illnesses, 2019-nCoV is thought to spread from person-to-person via contact with saliva and mucous.

According to the CDC, 2019-nCoV was first detected on December 8, 2019, in Wuhan City, Hubei Province in China, and has been expanding into other areas. In China, there have been 1,300 confirmed cases of the 2019-nCoV and 41 fatalities.

Two cases of 2019-nCoV have been discovered in the United States, though it is not thought to be spreading at this time.

Apple had also recently announced they would donate funds to ongoing relief efforts in Australia, where a dangerous combination of record temperatures, high winds and drought over the past two months set the stage for dozens of devastating bushfires. Cook did not specify how Apple will contribute, though the company has in the past donated funds to local non-profits and emergency service organizations during similar situations.

Apple commonly responds to catastrophes and natural disasters with financial aid. In 2018 the company provided $1 million contributions for victims of the Kerala floods in India, relief efforts following the Sulawesi earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, and Red Cross activity after the California wild fires and Hurricane Florence. Apple last donated to an emergency relief effort during this year's bout of California wild fires in October.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 2 of 26
    wizard69 said:
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    We have no idea how bad this coronavirus will be.  The numbers reported by China aren’t that alarming, but the actions taken by the government (2 days to build a 1000 room hospital, and quarantine efforts) says this is going to be nasty.

    No one is traveling to China right now.  Everyone is scrambling to get out, including our embassy staff (it sounds like).

    I’m not sure how Apple can help, but I’m sure the gesture is appreciated.
  • Reply 3 of 26
    wizard69 said:
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    I prefer Apple's approach to this kind of alarmist rhetoric. 
  • Reply 4 of 26
    wizard69 said:
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    I prefer Apple's approach to this kind of alarmist rhetoric. 
    People on the internet in the area report that the number of actual infected is about 90-100k. Chinese gov-t, just like soviet gov-t, simply downplays the issue.
    watto_cobraSpamSandwichCarnage
  • Reply 5 of 26
    Captain Trips, is that you?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 26
    People on the internet in the area report that the number of actual infected is about 90-100k. Chinese gov-t, just like soviet gov-t, simply downplays the issue.
    If you’re going to quote a number like that, I would provide references. People should know more than, “people on the internet.” 
    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 26
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,730member
    wizard69 said:
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    Bullshit.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/leahrosenbaum/2020/01/23/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-wuhan-coronavirus-outbreak/#2c9b02876fce

    How Deadly Is This Disease?

    The short answer is, we don’t know. If you look at the number of people reported to be infected (approximately 600, though this number is sure to rise) and compare to the number of deaths (17), you can calculate a number called the case fatality rate, which describes how deadly a disease is. Right now, the case fatality rate is a little under 3%. That means that 3% of people who become infected with the new coronavirus die. But this number is almost meaningless right now, since we don’t really know yet how many people are infected and how many deaths will occur in the coming weeks. One thing we do know: like many other illnesses, 2019-nCoV patients are more likely to die if they are old or suffer from other diseases. 

    I Live In North America, Should I Be Worried? 

    According to the CDC, the  immediate health risk to the general American public “is considered low at this time.” Only one case of 2019-nCoV in the U.S. has been reported, a Washington man with mild pneumonia who the state’s department of health says is recovering well. The biggest risk for infection is people living in or traveling around Wuhan, China. 

    I Was Also Recently In China - Are There Symptoms I Should Look Out For?

    The CDC advises doctors to look out for patients  who recently traveled to or near Wuhan and have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing,  symptoms that are similar to SARS and MERS. If you notice that these are also similar to the regular symptoms of pneumonia, you’re right. Cases of 2019-CoV are only confirmed at CDC labs. 


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_human_disease_case_fatality_rates

    At worst, it is postulated that coronavirus, treated, will have an estimated mortality rate of SARS, also a coronavirus, or about 11%, but certainly no where close to 50% mortality is being experienced in China.

    Apple certainly hasn't had many of its staff exposed to Coronavirus, and those that return from China to the West will be evaluated and quarantined as necessary, so that the spread of Coronavirus will be contained.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galidesivir


    edited January 2020 EsquireCatselijahgStrangeDaysronnwatto_cobramuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 26
    the monk said:
    People on the internet in the area report that the number of actual infected is about 90-100k. Chinese gov-t, just like soviet gov-t, simply downplays the issue.
    If you’re going to quote a number like that, I would provide references. People should know more than, “people on the internet.” 
    You do realize that 90 000 infected people is nothing for China, where the entire population is 1.5B? 
    I dont get all this skepticism, because I am surprised that it is not in the millions, given how poor the Chinese heath system is and how close people live to each other there and to animals. Anyway, here is a link. NYP talks about it here... the article should have a link to the video.
    https://nypost.com/2020/01/26/coronavirus-whistleblower-nurse-says-china-has-90000-sick/


    edited January 2020
  • Reply 9 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,120member
    wizard69 said:
    Apple might want to think about preparations right here in the USA.   As a company they are at high risk due to travel to China.  Apple could easily lose 50% of their staff.  
    Where are you getting that 50% figure from? Because it sounds like you completely made it up. 
    edited January 2020 tmayronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,297member
    In 1999 I listened in on a panel of virologists on the BBC World Service. 

    Their unanimous conclusion was that this century would be the century of the virus and that is how it is playing out, both animal to animal and animal to human.

    Industrialised farming and our ability to travel the world in ever shorter times in huge numbers are the keys to seeing viruses propagate so quickly. Locking cities down with millions of inhabitants seems like a quick reaction rather than a protocol move but we will learn from this.

    We mustn't forget either that with SARS, the number one recommendation from the WHO was not to wear masks but to wash hands frequently.

    Curiously and nothing to do with this virus, my regular visit Carrefour (hypermarket) has had a hand and cart handle cleaning station at the cart pick-up point for the last year or two. Along with free bags and ice and digital thermometers to check fresh fish temperature at purchase.

    More curiously, I wonder if China could couple AI and video surveillance/face recognition to track movements of people that have been in the company of infected people.

    If they aren't capable yet, I'm sure it will be on the cards for the future.
    Carnage
  • Reply 11 of 26
    the monk said:
    People on the internet in the area report that the number of actual infected is about 90-100k. Chinese gov-t, just like soviet gov-t, simply downplays the issue.
    If you’re going to quote a number like that, I would provide references. People should know more than, “people on the internet.” 
    You do realize that 90 000 infected people is nothing for China, where the entire population is 1.5B? 
    I dont get all this skepticism, because I am surprised that it is not in the millions, given how poor the Chinese heath system is and how close people live to each other there and to animals. Anyway, here is a link. NYP talks about it here... the article should have a link to the video.
    https://nypost.com/2020/01/26/coronavirus-whistleblower-nurse-says-china-has-90000-sick/

    Oh brother. First of all, the number of infected the entire world for the SARS virus was 8000. How did they get 90000 so soon? The article said the nurse did not tell how she arrived at her numbers. Sorry, bad reference at the NYPost with its tabloid headlines knows it. If this ever hit close to home, you would hope you would get accurate information. 90000 my ass.

    ronnwatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 26
    the monk said:
    the monk said:
    People on the internet in the area report that the number of actual infected is about 90-100k. Chinese gov-t, just like soviet gov-t, simply downplays the issue.
    If you’re going to quote a number like that, I would provide references. People should know more than, “people on the internet.” 
    You do realize that 90 000 infected people is nothing for China, where the entire population is 1.5B? 
    I dont get all this skepticism, because I am surprised that it is not in the millions, given how poor the Chinese heath system is and how close people live to each other there and to animals. Anyway, here is a link. NYP talks about it here... the article should have a link to the video.
    https://nypost.com/2020/01/26/coronavirus-whistleblower-nurse-says-china-has-90000-sick/

    Oh brother. First of all, the number of infected the entire world for the SARS virus was 8000. How did they get 90000 so soon? The article said the nurse did not tell how she arrived at her numbers. Sorry, bad reference at the NYPost with its tabloid headlines knows it. If this ever hit close to home, you would hope you would get accurate information. 90000 my ass.

    I agree... NYT is crap, but they mentioned that video I was talking about so that was the link I posted. Yes, due to nature of Chinese govt, it is almost impossible to officially confirm the number.... JUST LIKE WITH SARS.
    In this situation, it is better be a big scary fudged number and us overreacting, than us not having enough response, while still thinking the number is in several thousand max, when in reality it is in hundreds of thousands.
    Also, she might be getting accurate information, or she might be lying. Which way are you prepared to be wrong?
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 13 of 26
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,730member
    avon b7 said:
    In 1999 I listened in on a panel of virologists on the BBC World Service. 

    Their unanimous conclusion was that this century would be the century of the virus and that is how it is playing out, both animal to animal and animal to human.

    Industrialised farming and our ability to travel the world in ever shorter times in huge numbers are the keys to seeing viruses propagate so quickly. Locking cities down with millions of inhabitants seems like a quick reaction rather than a protocol move but we will learn from this.

    We mustn't forget either that with SARS, the number one recommendation from the WHO was not to wear masks but to wash hands frequently.

    Curiously and nothing to do with this virus, my regular visit Carrefour (hypermarket) has had a hand and cart handle cleaning station at the cart pick-up point for the last year or two. Along with free bags and ice and digital thermometers to check fresh fish temperature at purchase.

    More curiously, I wonder if China could couple AI and video surveillance/face recognition to track movements of people that have been in the company of infected people.

    If they aren't capable yet, I'm sure it will be on the cards for the future.
    Maybe China should consider a solution revolving around known public health practices instead of ancient medicine, wild animal markets, and primitive working and living conditions that are part and parcel of everyday life for a vast number of Chinese citizens.

    Surveillance didn't seem to have any impact on the death of 200 million pigs, half the pig population in China, due to the African Swine Fever, and it certainly wouldn't have any impact on a large portion of the Chinese population that isn't under daily surveillance, especially given that there isn't a sufficiently large and well trained medical community in China to actually treat people in a major epidemic, nor are there even enough forces in place to enforce a quarantine in a timely fashion.

    https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/sanchez-vizcaino-tells-how-spain-stopped-african-swine-fever

    It took Spain 35 years to eradicate African Swine Fever in its pork production, and China hasn't even mastered the basics of industrial animal husbandry, so how would we expect China to stop a human epidemic in a reliable way?
    edited January 2020 ronnwatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 14 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,297member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    In 1999 I listened in on a panel of virologists on the BBC World Service. 

    Their unanimous conclusion was that this century would be the century of the virus and that is how it is playing out, both animal to animal and animal to human.

    Industrialised farming and our ability to travel the world in ever shorter times in huge numbers are the keys to seeing viruses propagate so quickly. Locking cities down with millions of inhabitants seems like a quick reaction rather than a protocol move but we will learn from this.

    We mustn't forget either that with SARS, the number one recommendation from the WHO was not to wear masks but to wash hands frequently.

    Curiously and nothing to do with this virus, my regular visit Carrefour (hypermarket) has had a hand and cart handle cleaning station at the cart pick-up point for the last year or two. Along with free bags and ice and digital thermometers to check fresh fish temperature at purchase.

    More curiously, I wonder if China could couple AI and video surveillance/face recognition to track movements of people that have been in the company of infected people.

    If they aren't capable yet, I'm sure it will be on the cards for the future.
    Maybe China should consider a solution revolving around known public health practices instead of ancient medicine, wild animal markets, and primitive working and living conditions that are part and parcel of everyday life for a vast number of Chinese citizens.

    Surveillance didn't seem to have any impact on the death of 200 million pigs, half the pig population in China, due to the African Swine Fever, and it certainly wouldn't have any impact on a large portion of the Chinese population that isn't under daily surveillance, especially given that there isn't a sufficiently large and well trained medical community in China to actually treat people in a major epidemic, nor are there even enough forces in place to enforce a quarantine in a timely fashion.

    https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/sanchez-vizcaino-tells-how-spain-stopped-african-swine-fever

    It took Spain 35 years to eradicate African Swine Fever in its pork production, and China hasn't even mastered the basics of industrial animal husbandry, so how would we expect China to stop a human epidemic in a reliable way?
    Absolutely everything in that article is applicable to China today. There are direct parallels to be drawn on every level.

    China has gone through the exact same changes as Spain over the last 30 years. Economically, culturally and scientifically.

    In terms of scale though, the task is far more daunting for China. Ironically, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese government could be an advantage in some areas. The Chinese are used to the idea of surveillance and having facial recognition on different levels. Drastic measures like city wide containment are far easier to approve on a political level.

    On a technological level, China is entering the AI age at breakneck speed. 5G is now a reality and it won't be long before different elements come together to help manage these kinds of situations. Everything from the mathematical approach mentioned in the article through to realtime and historical tracking of people who have been in known incident areas and the resulting big data supercomputing processes and visualisation efforts will benefit from what China is doing.

    Just like in Spain though, bad habits persist in spite of them reducing with each generation. Food and food hygiene is one area where things need to improve more. 

    In all probability, this virus has its emergence in the same environment that avian flu came from. We learnt quickly that bird migration couldn't be stopped but people migrate too. Criss crossing the globe like never before. Many acting as carriers without manifesting symptoms.

    Other things that are culturally common such as spitting in the street will also slowly disappear. Perhaps these incidents will actually accelerate change.

    Climate change is also pushing pathogens into new areas and viruses are becoming common where incidence was previously low.

    On top of viruses that come to Spain for example through infected people, we are now seeing autoctonous infections resulting from invasive species. 

    Changes in education, habits, laws etc combined with the next industrial revolution (telecommunications, AI etc) could well prove to be of enormous value at some point in the future. Maybe the near future.
  • Reply 15 of 26
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,730member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    In 1999 I listened in on a panel of virologists on the BBC World Service. 

    Their unanimous conclusion was that this century would be the century of the virus and that is how it is playing out, both animal to animal and animal to human.

    Industrialised farming and our ability to travel the world in ever shorter times in huge numbers are the keys to seeing viruses propagate so quickly. Locking cities down with millions of inhabitants seems like a quick reaction rather than a protocol move but we will learn from this.

    We mustn't forget either that with SARS, the number one recommendation from the WHO was not to wear masks but to wash hands frequently.

    Curiously and nothing to do with this virus, my regular visit Carrefour (hypermarket) has had a hand and cart handle cleaning station at the cart pick-up point for the last year or two. Along with free bags and ice and digital thermometers to check fresh fish temperature at purchase.

    More curiously, I wonder if China could couple AI and video surveillance/face recognition to track movements of people that have been in the company of infected people.

    If they aren't capable yet, I'm sure it will be on the cards for the future.
    Maybe China should consider a solution revolving around known public health practices instead of ancient medicine, wild animal markets, and primitive working and living conditions that are part and parcel of everyday life for a vast number of Chinese citizens.

    Surveillance didn't seem to have any impact on the death of 200 million pigs, half the pig population in China, due to the African Swine Fever, and it certainly wouldn't have any impact on a large portion of the Chinese population that isn't under daily surveillance, especially given that there isn't a sufficiently large and well trained medical community in China to actually treat people in a major epidemic, nor are there even enough forces in place to enforce a quarantine in a timely fashion.

    https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/sanchez-vizcaino-tells-how-spain-stopped-african-swine-fever

    It took Spain 35 years to eradicate African Swine Fever in its pork production, and China hasn't even mastered the basics of industrial animal husbandry, so how would we expect China to stop a human epidemic in a reliable way?
    Absolutely everything in that article is applicable to China today. There are direct parallels to be drawn on every level.

    China has gone through the exact same changes as Spain over the last 30 years. Economically, culturally and scientifically.

    In terms of scale though, the task is far more daunting for China. Ironically, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese government could be an advantage in some areas. The Chinese are used to the idea of surveillance and having facial recognition on different levels. Drastic measures like city wide containment are far easier to approve on a political level.

    On a technological level, China is entering the AI age at breakneck speed. 5G is now a reality and it won't be long before different elements come together to help manage these kinds of situations. Everything from the mathematical approach mentioned in the article through to realtime and historical tracking of people who have been in known incident areas and the resulting big data supercomputing processes and visualisation efforts will benefit from what China is doing.

    Just like in Spain though, bad habits persist in spite of them reducing with each generation. Food and food hygiene is one area where things need to improve more. 

    In all probability, this virus has its emergence in the same environment that avian flu came from. We learnt quickly that bird migration couldn't be stopped but people migrate too. Criss crossing the globe like never before. Many acting as carriers without manifesting symptoms.

    Other things that are culturally common such as spitting in the street will also slowly disappear. Perhaps these incidents will actually accelerate change.

    Climate change is also pushing pathogens into new areas and viruses are becoming common where incidence was previously low.

    On top of viruses that come to Spain for example through infected people, we are now seeing autoctonous infections resulting from invasive species. 

    Changes in education, habits, laws etc combined with the next industrial revolution (telecommunications, AI etc) could well prove to be of enormous value at some point in the future. Maybe the near future.
    I mean, what the fuck.

    Do you even read any news about the coronavirus in China? It has been linked to "wet markets" which sell live wildlife for human consumption, and isn't linked to the avian flu. More to the point, there are huge populations in China that aren't under observation by surveillance systems, and these people are likely to have the very worst medical care.

    "Ironically, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese government could be an advantage in some areas.

    That's fucking bullshit. The Chinese could have adequate healthcare if the Chinese Government made it a priority. Instead, the Government is making surveillance and population control, plus a massive expenditure on growth of its military expansionism their priority. They have no inherent advantage over a Western government in controlling an epidemic, and given their penchant for hiding the facts on the epidemic, they have made it worse. Of, course, there would be an advantage in hiding the body count, given the control the government has over the press.

    Sometimes, you should just shut the fuck up with your misinformation.

    https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-01-26/new-and-dangerous-coronaviruses-will-keep-emerging-until-we-focus-on-preventing-them
    edited January 2020 ronnwatto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 16 of 26
    the planet is still recovering from that 2014 ebola virus, now this? 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,297member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    In 1999 I listened in on a panel of virologists on the BBC World Service. 

    Their unanimous conclusion was that this century would be the century of the virus and that is how it is playing out, both animal to animal and animal to human.

    Industrialised farming and our ability to travel the world in ever shorter times in huge numbers are the keys to seeing viruses propagate so quickly. Locking cities down with millions of inhabitants seems like a quick reaction rather than a protocol move but we will learn from this.

    We mustn't forget either that with SARS, the number one recommendation from the WHO was not to wear masks but to wash hands frequently.

    Curiously and nothing to do with this virus, my regular visit Carrefour (hypermarket) has had a hand and cart handle cleaning station at the cart pick-up point for the last year or two. Along with free bags and ice and digital thermometers to check fresh fish temperature at purchase.

    More curiously, I wonder if China could couple AI and video surveillance/face recognition to track movements of people that have been in the company of infected people.

    If they aren't capable yet, I'm sure it will be on the cards for the future.
    Maybe China should consider a solution revolving around known public health practices instead of ancient medicine, wild animal markets, and primitive working and living conditions that are part and parcel of everyday life for a vast number of Chinese citizens.

    Surveillance didn't seem to have any impact on the death of 200 million pigs, half the pig population in China, due to the African Swine Fever, and it certainly wouldn't have any impact on a large portion of the Chinese population that isn't under daily surveillance, especially given that there isn't a sufficiently large and well trained medical community in China to actually treat people in a major epidemic, nor are there even enough forces in place to enforce a quarantine in a timely fashion.

    https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/sanchez-vizcaino-tells-how-spain-stopped-african-swine-fever

    It took Spain 35 years to eradicate African Swine Fever in its pork production, and China hasn't even mastered the basics of industrial animal husbandry, so how would we expect China to stop a human epidemic in a reliable way?
    Absolutely everything in that article is applicable to China today. There are direct parallels to be drawn on every level.

    China has gone through the exact same changes as Spain over the last 30 years. Economically, culturally and scientifically.

    In terms of scale though, the task is far more daunting for China. Ironically, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese government could be an advantage in some areas. The Chinese are used to the idea of surveillance and having facial recognition on different levels. Drastic measures like city wide containment are far easier to approve on a political level.

    On a technological level, China is entering the AI age at breakneck speed. 5G is now a reality and it won't be long before different elements come together to help manage these kinds of situations. Everything from the mathematical approach mentioned in the article through to realtime and historical tracking of people who have been in known incident areas and the resulting big data supercomputing processes and visualisation efforts will benefit from what China is doing.

    Just like in Spain though, bad habits persist in spite of them reducing with each generation. Food and food hygiene is one area where things need to improve more. 

    In all probability, this virus has its emergence in the same environment that avian flu came from. We learnt quickly that bird migration couldn't be stopped but people migrate too. Criss crossing the globe like never before. Many acting as carriers without manifesting symptoms.

    Other things that are culturally common such as spitting in the street will also slowly disappear. Perhaps these incidents will actually accelerate change.

    Climate change is also pushing pathogens into new areas and viruses are becoming common where incidence was previously low.

    On top of viruses that come to Spain for example through infected people, we are now seeing autoctonous infections resulting from invasive species. 

    Changes in education, habits, laws etc combined with the next industrial revolution (telecommunications, AI etc) could well prove to be of enormous value at some point in the future. Maybe the near future.
    I mean, what the fuck.

    Do you even read any news about the coronavirus in China? It has been linked to "wet markets" which sell live wildlife for human consumption, and isn't linked to the avian flu. More to the point, there are huge populations in China that aren't under observation by surveillance systems, and these people are likely to have the very worst medical care.

    "Ironically, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese government could be an advantage in some areas.

    That's fucking bullshit. The Chinese could have adequate healthcare if the Chinese Government made it a priority. Instead, the Government is making surveillance and population control, plus a massive expenditure on growth of its military expansionism their priority. They have no inherent advantage over a Western government in controlling an epidemic, and given their penchant for hiding the facts on the epidemic, they have made it worse. Of, course, there would be an advantage in hiding the body count, given the control the government has over the press.

    Sometimes, you should just shut the fuck up with your misinformation.

    https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-01-26/new-and-dangerous-coronaviruses-will-keep-emerging-until-we-focus-on-preventing-them
    Re-read - slowly - what I wrote. 

    I never said this virus was related or linked to avian flu.

    I said that, in all probability, they had their roots in the same environment. That is:

    Close and regular contact with livestock. Poor hygiene practices both pre and post slaughter and pre and post sale.

    You simply imagined what I said, jumping in at the deep end again.

    China has the largest facial recognition database on the planet. Who said everyone was being tracked using facial recognition?

    Your imagination running wild?

    China is unique in its facial recognition and tracking ability. This can have both nefarious and positive uses. More than 52 countries worldwide are using Chinese technology in this sense. AI is becoming a major part of the technology.

    https://www.ft.com/content/6f1a8f48-1813-11ea-9ee4-11f260415385

    And following on from my first post:

    https://www.gizchina.com/2020/01/26/huawei-coronavirus-5g-base-stations/
    edited January 2020
  • Reply 18 of 26
    It is spreading because infected people are still flying out of China to other countries, including the US.  The CDC just reported cases in Los Angeles County because an infected person flew out of Wuhan City to Los Angeles.  So China doesn't care about who is leaving the country.  And Timmy Cook is in bed with China giving them money when they are allowing people to leave the country to infect other nations.  

    Wash your hands frequently and don't touch your face, eyes, mouth, or nose when touching many things in public places.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 19 of 26
    M68000M68000 Posts: 461member
    The CDC and other scientific\medical facilities and organizations in the world must determine more information about this damn thing ASAP.  Including how long does it stay active on surfaces,  what can be used to disinfect surfaces, etc...   There needs to be tremendous international support and communication between China and the rest of the world.
    edited January 2020
  • Reply 20 of 26
    ivanhivanh Posts: 597member
    Buy a $100 iTunes card at 20% off. You pay $80 and donate it for $100. Apple will donate $20, won’t they?
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