Select 2013 and 2014 MacBook Air, Pro models to be declared vintage and obsolete in April

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited June 2020
Apple plans to add a few additional MacBook models to its list of "vintage" and "obsolete" machines at the end of April, according to a report on Wednesday.

MacBook Air
Apple's mid-2013 MacBook Air.


Citing internal documents, MacRumors reports Apple will soon add 11- and 13-inch MacBook Air models from mid 2013 and early 2014, as well as the mid-2014 13-inch MacBook Pro, to its list of hardware deemed "obsolete."

Apple defines "vintage" products as devices that have not been produced for more than 5 and less than 7 years ago, according to a Support Pages document. So-called "obsolete" hardware is defined as any product that has been discontinued for more than 7 years.

Vintage MacBook Air and MacBook Pro models are eligible for repair through Apple's authorized network, including Apple Stores, as long as parts are available. Prolonged support might available in regions that require such measures by law.

Hardware service for obsolete products is discontinued without exception.

Apple regularly adds to its rolling list of vintage and obsolete products. Some recent additions include the popular iPhone 5 in 2018 and the iPad 2, which was declared obsolete last May.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    But, but, my 15” retina from early 2013 still works without a hitch .... how can you call that ancient?? 

    commentzillaMisterKitGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 26
    I refuse to give up my 2012 MacBook Pro- with a real keyboard- and user replaceable HD and RAM.
    And - a magsafe connector- and a DVD drive- and ethernet- I only need 1 dongle- to do video to a projector...
    Can't beat it.
    Sorry, Apple- what you now call "Pro" is a joke.
    MisterKitivanhrazorpitmacike
  • Reply 3 of 26
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    DVD drive, lol.

    Who the hell uses DVDs anymore? I can't even remember the last time I held a DVD in my hands. I still have DVD drives on a few old Macs, but I don't exactly use them these days too much. I think Apple called them Super Drives in those days.

    Just because Apple declares an old machine to be obsolete or vintage, that doesn't mean that your machine will cease to function. Use it for as long as you want. I have multiple older, vintage Macs, but I don't walk around deluding myself thinking that they are modern machines or get mad about newer machines not having SCSI ports or DVD drives on them.

    Just face it, if you have an older Mac, your machine is now vintage , obsolete, ancient, call it whatever you want. That doesn't mean it's not still useful.

    Tech moves forward, not backwards.
    randominternetpersonking editor the gratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,624member
    I’m not seeing the problem.  

    Use your devices until they die.  The only thing that’s changed is don’t expect parts for them if something breaks.  Also, be diligent on backups because Apple Stores might not be able to help you if something goes wrong.

    If you’re tech savvy you still have EBay for spare parts.  There’s always someone out their ready to make a killing for parts on obsolete equipment.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 26
    My MacBook Air Mid 2013 still runs like a champ on its original battery even. I religiously use FruitJuice to maintain the battery but I know that I will be replacing it soon. Love this machine and would finally be interested in trying one of the new Airs now that they have a tolerable keyboard on board and an upgraded screen. Will sorely miss all my ports though
    baconstang
  • Reply 6 of 26
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    I’m not seeing the problem.  

    Use your devices until they die.  The only thing that’s changed is don’t expect parts for them if something breaks.  Also, be diligent on backups because Apple Stores might not be able to help you if something goes wrong.

    If you’re tech savvy you still have EBay for spare parts.  There’s always someone out their ready to make a killing for parts on obsolete equipment.
    You can even upgrade obsolete machines with newer parts that didn't even exist when the machine was first released.

    I put an SSD drive in a Power Mac from 2000 recently. Works like a champ. It's pretty funny to be running OS 9 from an SSD.
    MisterKitrandominternetpersonrazorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 26
    Heck with the parts!  I want the OS and security patches.  The machine runs fine but what to do when some hack-ass finds a way to compromise the machine which then needs a patch Apple won’t produce because the OS is old and you can’t upgrade anymore.   Ugh!  Love my 2012 MacBook Air.   Still runs like a new machine and better than any PC I have ever owned with that many years on it. 
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 26
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,083member
    I refuse to give up my 2012 MacBook Pro- with a real keyboard- and user replaceable HD and RAM.
    And - a magsafe connector- and a DVD drive- and ethernet- I only need 1 dongle- to do video to a projector...
    Can't beat it.
    Sorry, Apple- what you now call "Pro" is a joke.
    Only one dongle and a DVD drive?! O, to only go back to those halcyon computing days of yore. 

    Hard to tell if someone actually thinks clinging to an 8 year old Mac somehow makes you a “pro” or if April Fools. 
    randominternetpersonroundaboutnowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 26
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,083member

    Heck with the parts!  I want the OS and security patches.  The machine runs fine but what to do when some hack-ass finds a way to compromise the machine which then needs a patch Apple won’t produce because the OS is old and you can’t upgrade anymore.   Ugh!  Love my 2012 MacBook Air.   Still runs like a new machine and better than any PC I have ever owned with that many years on it. 
    Your Mac can run Catalina, so not sure what you’re bitching about. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 26
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,083member

    apple ][ said:
    I’m not seeing the problem.  

    Use your devices until they die.  The only thing that’s changed is don’t expect parts for them if something breaks.  Also, be diligent on backups because Apple Stores might not be able to help you if something goes wrong.

    If you’re tech savvy you still have EBay for spare parts.  There’s always someone out their ready to make a killing for parts on obsolete equipment.
    You can even upgrade obsolete machines with newer parts that didn't even exist when the machine was first released.

    I put an SSD drive in a Power Mac from 2000 recently. Works like a champ. It's pretty funny to be running OS 9 from an SSD.
    User-serviceable parts has absolutely nothing to do with their vintage/obsolete designations 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 26
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,083member
    My MacBook Air Mid 2013 still runs like a champ on its original battery even. I religiously use FruitJuice to maintain the battery but I know that I will be replacing it soon. Love this machine and would finally be interested in trying one of the new Airs now that they have a tolerable keyboard on board and an upgraded screen. Will sorely miss all my ports though
    Slower USB and slower Thunderbolt? Yeah, RIP. 
    edited April 2020
  • Reply 12 of 26
    Heck with the parts!  I want the OS and security patches.  The machine runs fine but what to do when some hack-ass finds a way to compromise the machine which then needs a patch Apple won’t produce because the OS is old and you can’t upgrade anymore.   Ugh!  Love my 2012 MacBook Air.   Still runs like a new machine and better than any PC I have ever owned with that many years on it. 
    Fortunately for you "hack-asses" go where the money is.  And that isn't in going after a shrinking pool of people using computers close to a decade old.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 26
    zeus423zeus423 Posts: 142member
    My PowerMac 7100 from 1993 still works great with all original parts. Of course I only power it up at this point a few times a year for nostalgia, but what a rock solid machine!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 26
    I use an OG late 2014 27" 5K iMac as my daily driver at the office, but I still get a lot of use out of my early 2011 13" MBP i7 at home and occasionally on the road. (That sucker is heavy though!)

    I initially upgraded the RAM to 16GB after a couple of years, and stuck a 512GB SSD in it a little over a year ago. (The SSD sure made a difference). Still the original battery. I run the usual Office and iWork apps, but also AutoCAD LT (which it runs quite nicely). I still have Windows XP on a VM too  :#

    So 2014 MBPs are now "vintage" eh? Damn, I feel so old! Although my MBP still works great, every year that FOMO gets stronger and stronger. I'm surprised I lasted this long, but hell, I think I'll hang onto it for another nine months or so to make it to 10 years before getting a laptop upgrade...yes, 10 years! That's pretty amazing, isn't it?


    linkmanwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 26
    hammeroftruthhammeroftruth Posts: 1,173member
    I have a feeling Apple is going to extend the life of those products for a few more months since a lot of people who owned them and needed service couldn’t get it thru an Apple store during the closure. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 26
    ivanhivanh Posts: 597member
    I help many retirees and they have very mean pensions. They will be very disappointed to know that their last Macs purchased before they retired will soon be called “obsolete”. They just don’t have the money for replacement.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 17 of 26
    I get that these devices eventually face their inevitable obsolescence but I don’t care what Apple or anyone tells me, my 2014 MacBook Pro is the the best damn laptop I’ve had. It’s probably the best damn laptop that Apple has made in my book too. It’s got everything I need - no shortcomings and compromises for aesthetic’s sake. In the past almost 6 years of use, I’ve never once had to send it in for repair either. My only constant gripe with it has been the lack of storage and that running games on it could sometimes be a challenge but I’m not a gamer so it’s something I’ve been able to live with. So, I’m definitely not giving up this laptop anytime soon. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 26
    baconstangbaconstang Posts: 874member
    My 2013-14 MBA 11" doesn't care what you call it.  I got it with the i7 and the FULL 8GB of memory.
    It's running Mojave just fine.  The battery is good and so is MagSafe.  
    For more screen it drives an HD 24" with no problem.

    Now my 24" 2007 iMac is still hanging in there, although lately it randomly quits MAIL every so often.  But I still encounter optical discs on occasion and it handles them fine.
    And it helps keep the room warm.  It's not vintage or obsolete.  It's archaic...with an SSD.

    Guess my 5K is next to join the club in a couple of years.
    edited April 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 26
    aknabiaknabi Posts: 211member
    Ah the 2014 vintage MBPs were quite smooth and velvety, with a hint of chocolate... not like the 2016 which was flat, harsh and didn't pair well with bread crumbles
  • Reply 20 of 26
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,471member
    I refuse to give up my 2012 MacBook Pro- with a real keyboard- and user replaceable HD and RAM.
    And - a magsafe connector- and a DVD drive- and ethernet- I only need 1 dongle- to do video to a projector...
    Can't beat it.
    Sorry, Apple- what you now call "Pro" is a joke.
    I have the same one, a 15" however, I also have a new MBP and there is quite a difference in every way for the better.  You just have to plan.  I bought a magsafe adapter and made sure the config was semi-future proof as no upgradeability the dongle is actually not an issue with far more and better I/O, USBc, HDMI, Card reader, Ethernet , brilliant screen and so on.  So all in all, don't fear an upgrade if you think it through you'll love it.  Oh, what's a DVD?  ;)
    DavidEsratiroundaboutnowwatto_cobra
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