Apple Watch helps save the life of teen athlete in Oklahoma

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 34
    PezaPeza Posts: 198member
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    edited February 2020
  • Reply 22 of 34
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Ivanh actually has a point.  Statistically speaking, if hospitals tracked someone who died from a heart attack and was also wearing an Apple Watch, you could fairly state the watch did not help save that person’s life.  Is that data tracked?  I don’t know.  It would also be fair to say the person would have died with or without the watch.  But if you follow that logic, than it is equally fair to say that someone who did not die from a heart attack, would not have died with or without the watch on.  The watch may have alerted them to the problem, but would they have figured it out anyway, or would a love one seen the heart attack and acted?  Proximity to a hospital and the severity of the heart attack will all play a role.  You can’t contribute the reason someone lives just because they were wearing an Apple Watch.  

    As for the comments about heart rate.  I am a competitive cyclist and can only get my heart rate up to the 190 range with a very big effort.  I do that often, but man my heart is pounding in my chest!  It is very noticeable and I don’t need a watch to feel that.  Is part of that due to heavy breathing?  That may be the case, but 191 is very fast.  I feel fairly certain if my heart was at 191 sitting in a chair I would immediately know it.  

    My farther-in-law is 93 and has heart issues.  I’ve had him wear my Apple Watch and done the EKG and it always shows afib.  We don’t rush him into the hospital because that is a constant state for him.  He controls his heart with drugs and his doctor is aware of the situation.

    The Apple Watch is cool in many ways, but what it catches or misses when it comes to saving lives probably needs a lot more study.  

    That is a very different situation -- when your body is short of O2 and carrying to much CO2 things get VERY uncomfortable -- even mentally.  For instance, people with breathing difficulties from pneumonia go into acidosis and also become agitated and neurotically distressed .  But, especially since those of us who practice endurance sports track heart heart we tend to over focus on that as the source of discomfort.  But there it has merit simply because.the body is tracking O2 (actually CO2) levels and increases heart rate accordingly -- so heart rate is representative of what the body is really concerned about.

    The flip side of that is, due to an injury, I had to take 5 weeks off on top of having had an easy training period through the early winter.   Now that I am getting back into it, I find it very uncomfortable and my heart rate is elevated at fairly low paces.   As I train through the summer, my pace will increase as will my heart rate while my comfort level stays even because my body will be able to oxygenate itself (and dispose of CO2) more efficiently and effectively.  By August I will be able to sustain 90% of my max heart rate for an hour without undo discomfort.   It's why the measure of great runners and cyclists is measured in VO2Max rather than MaxHR.

    To the brain & body, the heart is just a service organ.  They are really concerned about how the overall system (vascular, respiratory and metabolic) are meeting their responsibilities to supply O2 & fuel and remove waste products.   If the heart rate is a little high, so be it.  shrug.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 23 of 34
    My Apple Watch has alerted my emergency contacts after a bad fall and let me call 911 after another medical event when I couldn’t get to my phone and I was home alone. As someone who lives alone, I say “if you love someone,, be sure they wear an Apple Watch.”

    Old or young, it provides a useful safety net. As they add more features, I think it becomes essential.
    StrangeDaysSpamSandwichBart Y
  • Reply 24 of 34
    macmarcus said:
    I agree, "saved my life" is way over the top here. A 190 BPM is interesting but hardly life threatening for most people especially a teenager. You need to have it checked out but not an emergency per se.... especially if converts within say 20 minutes. If he wasn't out of breath or feeling faint, so what. Happened to me over 190 BPM while grocery shopping and lasted for over 15 minutes and I am older than this teenager. No shortness of breath, didn't feel faint, practically didn't even notice. I did have it checked out like a year later by a cardiologist who laughed. I insisted I wanted thorough tests (at my expense if need be) and the cardiologist concluded I'll never need to see a cardiologist for the rest of my life as all was great. No major symptoms but had felt a tad funny for some reason when my Apple Watch showed 190+... Anyway, the Apple Watch is great... I love mine, but probably rarely a "life saver" but it can provide an alert for concerns. My story is "real world" versus some people who are posting about things they don't know about or have no direct experience with. 190 is technically above my 100% for my age but the cardiologist had zero concerns and said EMT's and emergency room docs blow such a thing way out of proportion.

    Yes, everything you said was true.
    But, if a heart rate goes to 90%, 100% or a 110% of its max for no discernible reason it means that something in the body's complex regulatory systems is out of wack.   It doesn't necessarily mean that the heart itself is at fault as it responds to both electrical signals as well as hormonal -- and either of them can get out of wack from, say, anxiety.  

    But, on the other hand, your heart also has its own electrical system that can get out of wack itself.    In this case, I seriously doubt (or at least hope) that they didn't operate on this boy simply from the signal from his Apple Watch but instead verified that it was happening on an ongoing basis and that it was the heart and its electrical system itself causing it.  But, the Apple Watch provided the 'early detection' that there was something wrong.


    StrangeDays
  • Reply 25 of 34
    As for the comments about heart rate.  I am a competitive cyclist and can only get my heart rate up to the 190 range with a very big effort.  I do that often, but man my heart is pounding in my chest!  It is very noticeable and I don’t need a watch to feel that.  Is part of that due to heavy breathing?  That may be the case, but 191 is very fast.  I feel fairly certain if my heart was at 191 sitting in a chair I would immediately know it. 

    No, you wouldn't. You have no idea what tachycardia is like. The heart rate speeds up but the pumping volume per beat goes down because there's not enough time for the heart to refill properly. The blood is not surging through the body. Stop trying to compare it with high exertion activities. Besides, on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog. I can claim to be Cat 1 racer, too.
    GeorgeBMacStrangeDaysfastasleep
  • Reply 26 of 34
    ivanh said:
    What did the cardiologist say? Did he/she declare “oh, it’s the Apple Watch that saved the boy.” I haven’t heard of it coming out of a physician.  
    Moreover, you may encounter all kinds of life threatening events and an Apple Watch only detects one out of thousands. So, don’t be too excited.
    Guess you haven’t been paying attention then. Numerous stories over the years of people having conditions detected by AW. Apple even released a video of some of them, and all of your negative nancy posturing won’t change this. 

    Apparently it kills some of you that AW has indeed saved lives, while competitor products sit in drawers. Get over it. 
    edited February 2020 GeorgeBMacBart Y
  • Reply 27 of 34
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Bart Y
  • Reply 28 of 34
    I personally know of a person who was having a cardiac event and was warned to immediately see a doctor with the Apple Watch. It really is a lifesaver.
    Bart Y
  • Reply 29 of 34
    PezaPeza Posts: 198member
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.
  • Reply 30 of 34
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Bart Y
  • Reply 31 of 34
    PezaPeza Posts: 198member
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Oh I’m fully aware of this, but it will show abnormalities and FYI 12 lead ECG machines couldn’t detect anything wrong with me either, apart from my heart rate..
  • Reply 32 of 34
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Oh I’m fully aware of this, but it will show abnormalities and FYI 12 lead ECG machines couldn’t detect anything wrong with me either, apart from my heart rate..

    Well, then they did their job.  Tachycardia simply means high heart rate.
  • Reply 33 of 34
    PezaPeza Posts: 198member
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Oh I’m fully aware of this, but it will show abnormalities and FYI 12 lead ECG machines couldn’t detect anything wrong with me either, apart from my heart rate..

    Well, then they did their job.  Tachycardia simply means high heart rate.
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Oh I’m fully aware of this, but it will show abnormalities and FYI 12 lead ECG machines couldn’t detect anything wrong with me either, apart from my heart rate..

    Well, then they did their job.  Tachycardia simply means high heart rate.

    Actually SVT is not simply a high heart rate and ECG is used to detect SVT as it will show it on readings, that’s why they put electrodes directly onto your heart to detect where exactly the rogue electrical signals are to burn the heart to stop them.. 
    You’ve simplified a condition that ECG can and will detect and prove.
  • Reply 34 of 34
    Bart YBart Y Posts: 42unconfirmed, member
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    Peza said:
    This story is not accurate. I have SVT, well it’s what they think it is but no ECG has detected it yet. It is not a life threatening condition as stated by my cardiologist, that’s nothing but a click bait title I’m afraid. It’s also not necessarily a heart disease either as it can be caused by rogue tissue from when you were born even.
    Also the ECG monitor on the Apple Watch doesn’t always detect it, I have a series 4 and it won’t detect it, it just gives a reading like if your exercising. 
    And in my case, I know when my heart rate goes from 70 to 170 in a matter of seconds when I’m sitting down! You don’t need any Apple Watch to tell you your heart rate is spiking for no reason, yes it’s not the same for everyone, but most people I believe do feel it.
    It’s best to use the heart rate monitor in the Apple Watch and pinch your nose and close your mouth and try to blow out hard, this can help control it during an attack. Or even stop it.

    Ironically it’s a condition that can be brought on by exercise as much as anything else.
    I went to A&E twice by ambulance with my first two attacks purely because it had not been diagnosed by anyone. Once my cardiologist who I saw after the second attack diagnosed the condition though, I just send him an email with any readings I’ve taken to let him know if I have an attack, I am on beta blockers for my condition now as I had several attacks in 6 months, but some people don’t need to take any action, but if it gets worst or doesn’t stop Nader medication you will need this procedure to stop the rogue electric signals.

    The condition is also different for most, some can have an attack that last seconds, some can have an attack that lasts for days... mine have lasted for several hours before the heart settles back down, that’s why I ended up in A&E, mine would spike to 170 ish, maybe a bit higher, then settle back to 140 quickly and then take several hours to drop below 100, they don’t like your heart rate to be over 100 for an extended period when your simply lying on a bed..

    I can also ascertain that the Apple Watch heart rate monitor as as accurate as the monitors paramedics and hospitals use, mine was giving the exact same reading as the other equipment used the whole time! Good job Apple!!..
    Not everyone is the same. My husband has SVT and it caused alot of issues in school but he definitely feels his attacks now. I do worry. I worked with someone who had SVT and didn't take care of himself (before he worked with me) and it caused him to need open heart surgery and he almost died, from his SVT. So not every person is the same. I doubt this kid had an unnecessary surgery. 

    Some of you are apple hating. This doesn't just help people with heart issues. I've read many stories of people falling and being helped by apple watches. One older man was riding his bike on some trails and fell off and down a hill. His watch alerted authorities and it alerted his son and when his son arrived they were loading his dad into an ambulance. If he hadn't been wearing that watch then he would have lain there for hours before anyone knew he was even missing, then they would have had to go searching instead of the watch telling them exactly where he was, there is no telling how that would have turned out. If you search for apple watch saved me stories I bet you find a ton. 
    Oh absolutely everyone’s different. My cardiologist said their isn’t really any reason as yet that they know why it happens. No ECG reading could detect anything wrong, but I was not out of breath or anything and my heart was at 140bpm whilst lying on the hospital bed. 
    I was and still am overweight, but the day after my first attack I changed my diet and have since lost weight, I walk the dog everyday too if I can. I cut out a lot of sugar and eat blueberries with plain weetabix for breakfast with a glass of water, then have a handful of mixed dry unsalted nuts a day and grapes for fibre and vitamin C. I also have hardly drank any alcohol since. Think I’ll become a tea total person. 
    It will take me a long time to lose the weight, but better to do it slowly and keep it off, then fast and only put it back on later.. 

    For me personally my Apple Watch was fantastic as it showed my my exact BPM, and recorded it. Just a shame the ECG has never detected anything wrong, probably a good thing though?

    Only bad thing for me is I really liked my coffee, I bought several different types and enjoyed sniffing all the different aromas in the coffee shop, but they think that probably contributed to the SVT so I’ve had to give that up too..

    Unfortunately for me, I had to deal with my local GP surgery, which aren’t the best and it takes at least two weeks for an appointment, it took me three weeks to get them to prescribe me my beta blockers on repeat prescription, that’s three weeks after my cardiologist told me to take them! He had to write a letter to them and I still had to have an appointment just for the doctor to say yes you can have them, he didn’t even bother examining me in the slightest! In the UK it’s a terrible system now, the specialists, paramedics and hospital staff are fantastic, but it’s almost impossible to get your GP to do anything and they are the only ones who can prescribe drugs for you, unless it’s an A&E doctor.. It’s all because the system can’t cope.

    The ECG on the Apple Watch is called a "single lead ECG" and simply doesn't measure everything that a full 12 lead medical ECG can measure.   Basically all ANY single lead can do is measure heart rate.  But it can does so more accurately than the optical scanner so it can more accurately record irregular heart rates -- frequently called "A-Fib". 


    Oh I’m fully aware of this, but it will show abnormalities and FYI 12 lead ECG machines couldn’t detect anything wrong with me either, apart from my heart rate..
    A few things here (an I am a retired family medicine doctor):
    SVT is a condition and/or an anomaly of the heart’s electrical conduction system.  As such it is an abnormality that can, rarely, lead to sudden death.  More commonly, the condition ranges from no symptoms to symptoms that are felt or symptoms that can affect you significantly.

    in this teens case, as a student athlete, he did not perceive any symptoms, possibly because he had been having SVT in the past and had no symptoms or had ignored or gotten used to it, we don’t quite know.  Patients who’s first attacks are symptomatic May report lightheadedness, dizziness, chest discomfort, shortness of breath, fatigue, palpitations.  These are not some random feelings, these can be real issues because they relate to the very rapid heart rate, reduced atrial and ventricular volume filling, and subsequent reduced cardiac output for some, leading to temporary or prolonged blood pressure changes, cardiac oxygen demand, potential inability to tolerate exercise.

    The Apple Watch can detect the rapid heart rate and the ECG could potentially provide clues for the SVT diagnosis but a true 12 lead EKG is considered the gold standard - IF, IF it happens to capture the event in real time.  The only reason your doctors haven’t caught it is they haven’t checked often enough.  Since SVT is irregularly sporadic and spontaneous, IMO, your doctors or cardiologist should have had you wear a Holter monitor to record your EKG rhythms over a 48hr-7 day span repeatedly till the event is recorded.  Or conduct a treadmill stress test to provoke the SVT.  I do not understand why your doctor hasn’t done those tests. 

    You and your doctor did feel your condition warranted daily medication to control it, and you do feel changes which make it uncomfortable for you. As noted, not everyone feels it but imagine a symptomatic attack when you are doing something that requires attention and physical effort - driving, cycling, hiking, physical sports, operating machinery, etc.  This could lead to potential injury or risk not otherwise expected.  And for young people and young athletes, heart rhythm abnormalities can lead to fainting, shortness of breath, and rarely, serious complication including fibrillation and sudden death.  Rare but any potentially averted death is meaningful.

    Again, you haven’t had an ECG find it yet, and at rest you didn’t feel much with  a 140 rate.  But imagine you at taking a brisk jog and you get an SVT attack.  Normally during exercise you’re heart rate is 120-130, but now it may jump to 170-180 uncontrolled.  You might or might not fall, faint, or have nothing happen except your heart is working a lot more than it has to.  Your Apple Watch would trigger and say you have a heart rate above normal for this activity, even exercise.  If you had the Holter on, it would capture this event for future review.  So not finding is just that, not found...yet.  Your doctors and you need to keep looking and hope to record it, otherwise it’s educated guesswork.

    Sorry to hear you must give up the alcohol and coffee but those both, along with smoking (the nicotine and caffeine are heart rate stimulants) exacerbate SVT.  I truly don’t understand why the cardiologist couldn’t prescribe your beta blockers, he was a doctor too with prescribing privileges too?  What a waste of time if your doctors can’t communicate with each other besides snail mail, archaic!   My GP or any doctor here in the US can use electronic medical records and prescribe directly to the pharmacy of my choice with the stroke of a stylus or computer mouse.


Sign In or Register to comment.