Top-spec 13-inch MacBook Pros can handle 87W adapters, but benefits are limited

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in General Discussion
Apple's higher-end 13-inch MacBook Pros are equipped to take advantage of 87W power adapters, though users won't see any charging speed benefits from the change.

Though it won't allow for faster charging, an 87W power adapter could deliver a bit more power to 13-inch MacBook Pros during select workloads.
Though it won't allow for faster charging, an 87W power adapter could deliver a bit more power to 13-inch MacBook Pros during intense workloads.


New 13-inch MacBook Pro models with four Thunderbolt 3 ports and 10th-generation Intel processors carry a dual power input rating of 20.3 volts and 3 amps, and 20.2 volts and 4.3 amps. That technically means they're able to accept power from Apple's 87W adapter that shipped with last-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro models.

Prior 13-inch MacBook Pro models, dating back to 2016, shipped with a 61-watt USB-C power adapter and support a draw rating of 20.3 volts and 3 amps. That has not changed on current low-end MacBook Pros, and Apple continues to include its 61W adapter with all 13-inch variants.

Sources told MacRumors that higher-end 13-inch MacBook Pro models won't be able to charge any faster, since internal charging settings are the same as previous generations.

However, some professional users may see a benefit with a higher-wattage adapter during demanding workloads. An 87W charger might also deliver a bit more headroom if, say, a CPU is maxed out while the MacBook Pro is connected to multiple external displays.

Users of the 13-inch MacBook Pro have long been able to safely charge using higher-watt adapters, though maximum charging speeds are capped at the machine level.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 6
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,102member
    What does this mean, that you can drain the battery while on the chargers they ship with under heavy load? Weird. I don't see that happening with my 15" and its charger (but I do when plugged into my hub which only delivers 60W).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 6
    What does this mean, that you can drain the battery while on the chargers they ship with under heavy load? Weird. I don't see that happening with my 15" and its charger (but I do when plugged into my hub which only delivers 60W).
    I would imagine it just means the battery will charge slower under heavy load. I doubt they would ship a power adapter with it that would allow for battery drain while plugged in— even under heavy load. Not that I’ve any evidence for this, so could be wrong.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 6
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,102member
    What does this mean, that you can drain the battery while on the chargers they ship with under heavy load? Weird. I don't see that happening with my 15" and its charger (but I do when plugged into my hub which only delivers 60W).
    I would imagine it just means the battery will charge slower under heavy load. I doubt they would ship a power adapter with it that would allow for battery drain while plugged in— even under heavy load. Not that I’ve any evidence for this, so could be wrong.
    That makes more sense. I guess I was confused by what "deliver a bit more headroom" means.
    randominternetpersonwatto_cobraraoulduke42
  • Reply 4 of 6
    karmadavekarmadave Posts: 368member
    The Dell 27" USB-C monitors will charge laptops up to 65watts. It will charge the 13" MBP no problem. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 6
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,148member
    The 87W adapter will run cooler than the supplied 60W adapter on the smaller laptops. I lost a lower wattage adapter because I let it get too warm (longish story). I replaced it with a 85W adapter and was surprised at how much cooler it ran.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 6
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,646member
    macgui said:
    The 87W adapter will run cooler than the supplied 60W adapter on the smaller laptops. I lost a lower wattage adapter because I let it get too warm (longish story). I replaced it with a 85W adapter and was surprised at how much cooler it ran.
    I wonder why? The only explanations would be more efficient electronics or better heat dissipation. Or possibly you original supply was defective to begin with and was running hotter than it should have?

    this article makes little sense. One could also claim that the MBP can handle a 1000 watt adapter but it won’t make much difference. 
    watto_cobra
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