Apple TV with A12X ready to go at any time, claims leaker

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  • Reply 61 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    mbdrake76 said:
    neilm said:
    mbdrake76 said:
    It's pity they're not putting storage capacities in the terabytes on these things to allow you to download all your iTunes movie purchases - because if you don't download them, and the content provider pulls it from the iTunes store - you're screwed.  Just had a title removed from my library that I bought in 2015 for this reason.
    [snip]
    And you don't get any recompense or any notification whatsoever from Apple prior to the title being withdrawn.  It makes buying movies from them a massive risk (even worse with other digital stores such as Amazon or Google Play as you don't get to download them as a file as you do with iTunes - assuming one has a computer, of course).
    Apple doesn't own the copyright to movies from major studios, and doesn't set the availability or terms of sale. That's why, for instance, new releases are sold for some time before being offered for rental. And when a studio, or its distributor, pulls a title from online sale or rental, its gone. It's also common for titles to be pulled from streaming temporarily during the period when they're being aired on cable or network TV. Again, that's a contract thing that the streaming service has no control over.
    Streaming I absolutely get.  It's why I subscribe to so many.  And no, Apple does not own the copyright to the content they are selling (more like renting/licensing).  But the practice of calling something a "purchase" or "buy" and then having it pulled from under you - even with all the caveats and legal definitions - screams anti-consumer law to me.  At best it's an extended rental that offers no set limits.  And I intend to challenge Apple with this in the UK after giving them a week or two to respond to my queries about this.
    Also in the UK here. Let me know how you get on as I have had the same issue and no comeback from them. Agree that disc+digital a mess here and can’t see how what Apple does isn’t a breach of consumer law - especially when 4K titles CANNOT be stored at all. 
    I intend to chase them up in a week's time, then take it forward with the Citizen's Advice Bureau.  They will probably tell me that there's nothing that can be done, but I've gathered enough screenshots, documents and evidence that would - at the very least - make Apple change/improve the phrases used within their terms (they only ever refer to redownloads, not streaming - which the only thing the Apple TV can do) so that it absolutely clarifies what it is you're agreeing to when you hit the "buy" button.  I think their terms of service are still stuck in the past when iTunes could only download movies and TV shows before playing them. 

    I also want Apple to give me the distributor details so I can try and find a physical disk copy of the movie where possible because it is a bit of a tricky bugger to find on Blu-Ray (failing that, I'll just go direct to the studio) and would have to buy a DVD.  Strangely, the same title is available to buy or rent via Amazon Prime Video in the UK - but I strongly suspect that (because it's the same distributor) they'll be pulling it from Amazon at some point in the near future too.

    Meanwhile, I am downloading movies that I care about - mainly French independent films - that are more likely to be pulled than the big studio ones.  Shove them in the cloud via Backblaze and Backblaze B2 storage as well as a Time Machine backup.  I worked out that it'd cost over $110 to keep Backblaze B2 backup of my iTunes library per year - and more if I ever had to download it.  NAS is all well and good and using redundancy on the drives to protect it against individual disk failure, but if my house is destroyed, that's it.  I don't expect regular consumers to go through all this, it has to be said. 

  • Reply 62 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    stompy said:

    Serious question: is there a for-purchase video retailer that 'sells' movies and guarantees you can stream it as long as the retailer exists?

    I know there are many who've had the same experience, but this has been publicized widely. Even moving to a different country can affect your ability to stream a 'purchase'.

    For years, when I've 'bought' a digital movie, I've backed it up within a week or so. Contrary to what others have suggested, huge storage and expense are far from necessary: buy a 2TB portable drive for ~ $60 to store hundreds of HD movies.
    None that I know of.  Pretty much all of them state that you can stream and where downloads are available, you get unlimited access to it until the content provider or the service provider removes it from their service (for whatever reason).  I did find ONE digital video retailer that will give you notice: Rakuten TV.  Amazon and Apple will not give you any notice whatsoever.

    Yes, Apple at least has been doing this since 2013 and there have been a few publicised cases since then, with little or no improvement from them or any other digital content retailer.  And one has got to ask why consumer laws haven't been changed accordingly in a world which is turning more and more to cloud storage - the answer is more than likely because the people that write and enforce them haven't got a flipping clue.  They see "download" and that's that.  In reality, it's a bit more complicated than that.
  • Reply 63 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    2) Normals don’t need to do this. Most people need never worry about local storage or studios revoking their iTunes movies. It’s a fringe case. 
    It's going to be less fringey, especially during this pandemic when cinemas are shut and studios are doing much more with digital content when they start charging over $25 to "buy" movies digitally.  Warner Bros. is doing exactly that right now.  Imagine in 5 years time and you're going through your iTunes library and thinking that you thought you'd bought X title and it's not there anymore because Warner Bros. was bought out or doesn't exist in its current form (unlikely, but anything's possible these days).  And that X title is the more expensive title you bought because you wanted to see it as soon as possible.  You'd likely to get pretty hacked off about it as you'll need to either dig through backups to find it (assuming you've been keeping good data protection practices), or buy it again on physical media, assuming the studio released it on physical media.  Or the third, and less desirable option: revert to piracy.
  • Reply 64 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    Well I hope you don’t ever read your software licensing agreements. 

    Ima go on a limb and guess you’re not a lawyer. 
    Who does?  And how many times have those type of agreements actually been enforced when broken (other than piracy and/or abuse of the number of licenses being used)?  If I were a lawyer, I'd not be complaining about any of this because I'd be a lot wealthier and just pay for another copy of the movie elsewhere. ;)
  • Reply 65 of 80
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,949member
    I like the remote.

    there, I have said it.
  • Reply 66 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    Yup, one can use a networked iTunes library on ATV today. 
    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    edited May 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 67 of 80
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,780member
    If this turns out to be accurate, then there’s no doubt in my mind that the reason for the increased storage and upgraded chip is Apple Arcade, future game services, and some future functionality that needs more local storage (HomeKit or other technologies). Although I don’t have problems with my Apple TV 4K remote, it could certainly stand some improvement and I would like to see that on this list new models as well.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 68 of 80
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,306member
    There was a rumor last year around this time that Apple was working on a first party game controller, but Dalrymple noped it. Just popped in my head again. Guessing the nope was accurate given they pushed out PS/XB controller compatibility last year, why reinvent the wheel if they need parity across controllers? Still kinda weird. I feel like they could've owned this out of the gate, but now it'd be just weird.

    Out of curiosity, anyone here actually ever play games with the Siri Remote?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 69 of 80
    mpw_amherstmpw_amherst Posts: 561member
    mbdrake76 said:
    Yup, one can use a networked iTunes library on ATV today. 
    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    Although this is all moot as if AniMill’s correct than even if you’ve downloaded it, any pulled title flags as unplayable anyway. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 70 of 80
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,306member
    mbdrake76 said:

    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    They have this, it's called a Mac mini with Home Sharing turned on. You can download your entire library of purchases to it, share it to all your other devices, and don't need to back it up (except any data outside of purchases from Apple, which you're always responsible for anyway).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 71 of 80
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,306member
    mbdrake76 said:
    Yup, one can use a networked iTunes library on ATV today. 
    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    Although this is all moot as if AniMill’s correct than even if you’ve downloaded it, any pulled title flags as unplayable anyway. 
    You can't play iTunes Store content outside of Apple software, because duh.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 72 of 80
    esummers said:
    When the A12X originally came out, Apple said “ delivers Xbox One S class graphics performance in a product that’s 94% smaller.”

    Maybe this is a move to expand Apple Arcade?
    I'm sure Apple Arcade is one of the primary purposes for it. The A12X is a hefty upgrade for GPU performance vs the A10X, and the fact that the ATV is always plugged into a power source will juice it a bit more vs gaming on the current crop of iPad Pros. Unreal Engine games like Oceanhorn 2  looked pretty fantastic running on the A12 in my iPhone XS, so I can imagine a plugged A12X connected to a 4K TV is going to be impressive. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 73 of 80
    mpw_amherstmpw_amherst Posts: 561member
    mbdrake76 said:
    Yup, one can use a networked iTunes library on ATV today. 
    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    Although this is all moot as if AniMill’s correct than even if you’ve downloaded it, any pulled title flags as unplayable anyway. 
    You can't play iTunes Store content outside of Apple software, because duh.
    No I took the point to be that even if you’ve downloaded a title to your Mac on iTunes then if the studio pulls it from the Store then it will no longer be signed off, as it were, as playable. Which renders the whole download option moot? Sorry if I’ve misunderstood 
  • Reply 74 of 80
    beowulfschmidtbeowulfschmidt Posts: 1,835member
    mbdrake76 said:
    It's pity they're not putting storage capacities in the terabytes on these things to allow you to download all your iTunes movie purchases - because if you don't download them, and the content provider pulls it from the iTunes store - you're screwed.  Just had a title removed from my library that I bought in 2015 for this reason.  As I have 1.75Tb worth of movies and that Apple storage is incredibly expensive, keeping them in the "cloud" seems the only reasonable way of doing it.  But no. 
    Buy an NAS RAID and plug it into your home network. 

    I have a Synology DiskStation DS218+ with 2 workstation class Seagate 8TB drives for about $800 total.

    It was a little tricky to setup, but now all my media files are stored on it and use it for wireless Time Machine backups for my wife’s and my MacBook Pros. 

    PLUS, all my stuff is safe at home, not floating around somewhere to disappear if somehow the wires get cut.
    I have a similar setup, though not as much space.  I also have an online backup though, for the same reason I have fire and disaster insurance on my house.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 75 of 80
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,132member
    Word is they're also making a first party gamepad. 

    If the price remains the same it should be with the A12X+gamepad in an Arcade themed bundle, that's getting into serious microconsole power there. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 76 of 80
    thttht Posts: 4,805member
    tipoo said:
    Word is they're also making a first party gamepad. 

    If the price remains the same it should be with the A12X+gamepad in an Arcade themed bundle, that's getting into serious microconsole power there. 
    You always have to question Apple's commitment to games. Maybe this time it is different as this is basically an extension of their iPhone/iPad game platform to a TV, and it can carve out a niche.

    The Apple TV also really needs a couple of USBC ports. Minimally, it should provide support for a FaceTime camera and mic attached so people can video conference with their TVs.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 77 of 80
    mbdrake76mbdrake76 Posts: 42member
    jcs2305 said:
    mbdrake76 said:
    mjtomlin said:
    mbdrake76 said:
    It's pity they're not putting storage capacities in the terabytes on these things to allow you to download all your iTunes movie purchases - because if you don't download them, and the content provider pulls it from the iTunes store - you're screwed.  Just had a title removed from my library that I bought in 2015 for this reason.  As I have 1.75Tb worth of movies and that Apple storage is incredibly expensive, keeping them in the "cloud" seems the only reasonable way of doing it.  But no. 

    And you don't get any recompense or any notification whatsoever from Apple prior to the title being withdrawn.  It makes buying movies from them a massive risk (even worse with other digital stores such as Amazon or Google Play as you don't get to download them as a file as you do with iTunes - assuming one has a computer, of course).  Subscriptions to Apple TV+, Netflix, Amazon, Disney, etc. are fine - you know what you're getting and you're willing to accept that you'd lose access to them if you stopped subscribing or if their licensing no longer permits them to stream the title. 

    So for me, the Apple TV has lost its appeal somewhat.

    This isn't a media server, it's a media streamer... If you want all your movies saved locally, do it on your computer and use it as a media server. My iMac has long been used as my "iTunes" server with some 2 terabytes of movies, tv shows, music, podcasts, and photos all stored on an external hard drive.
    You're making the assumption everybody has a computer or NAS.  Plus 4K/HDR content cannot be downloaded as a file.  Maybe if Apple were to make the Apple TV a dedicated media server as well with sufficient storage (or the ability to add extra storage) and worked super nicely with iPhones, iPads, Macs and Windows PCs running Apple TV app - that'd be one possible way of doing it, I suppose.

    I use an older ( Mid 2011 ) Mini with 10TB of storage connected directly to it via external HD's. Infuse for Appletv allows me to see all of my content on the externals by creating individual share drives for each one within the infuse App installed on all of my ATV's. What makes it nice is that Infuse's playback engine uses the ATV itself to do the transcoding so my computer doesn't have to get bogged down handling video streams. 

    I would assume most folks with 4K ATV's have some type of computer, and this is an easy and cheap way to put together a media server set up in your home. All you need is a working machine ( Mac or Windows ) , and external hard drive and an Appletv.  I think Infuse Pr0 lifetime is $5.99 a year.
    .. and access to somebody with sufficient IT skills. 

    Unlike, say, my 77 year old dad who wouldn't know what to do even if he had the outlay to spend on the extra kit to be able to do something like this.  It's bad enough with him and physical Blu-Ray disks.  He's only just upgraded to a 4K TV and (normal HD) Blu-Ray player.  Apple sells the iTunes store as a one-size-fits-all solution to buying and watching movies across your Apple devices easily (as do other digital content providers).   What my dad doesn't want to do is have another computer/device or storage device to worry about in order to keep his digital content safe.


    mpw_amherstGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 78 of 80
    Beats said:
    Apple is NOT taking gaming seriously and we are yet to see modern console quality titles. Even though Apple TV is more powerful that Switch we are yet to see games anywhere near that quality.
    You say that, but then you post a trailer for 'Seasons of Heaven', a game that was originally announced in 2016 for Nintendo Switch and has never released? 
    watto_cobrafastasleep
  • Reply 79 of 80
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    mbdrake76 said:
    jcs2305 said:
    mbdrake76 said:
    mjtomlin said:
    mbdrake76 said:
    It's pity they're not putting storage capacities in the terabytes on these things to allow you to download all your iTunes movie purchases - because if you don't download them, and the content provider pulls it from the iTunes store - you're screwed.  Just had a title removed from my library that I bought in 2015 for this reason.  As I have 1.75Tb worth of movies and that Apple storage is incredibly expensive, keeping them in the "cloud" seems the only reasonable way of doing it.  But no. 

    And you don't get any recompense or any notification whatsoever from Apple prior to the title being withdrawn.  It makes buying movies from them a massive risk (even worse with other digital stores such as Amazon or Google Play as you don't get to download them as a file as you do with iTunes - assuming one has a computer, of course).  Subscriptions to Apple TV+, Netflix, Amazon, Disney, etc. are fine - you know what you're getting and you're willing to accept that you'd lose access to them if you stopped subscribing or if their licensing no longer permits them to stream the title. 

    So for me, the Apple TV has lost its appeal somewhat.

    This isn't a media server, it's a media streamer... If you want all your movies saved locally, do it on your computer and use it as a media server. My iMac has long been used as my "iTunes" server with some 2 terabytes of movies, tv shows, music, podcasts, and photos all stored on an external hard drive.
    You're making the assumption everybody has a computer or NAS.  Plus 4K/HDR content cannot be downloaded as a file.  Maybe if Apple were to make the Apple TV a dedicated media server as well with sufficient storage (or the ability to add extra storage) and worked super nicely with iPhones, iPads, Macs and Windows PCs running Apple TV app - that'd be one possible way of doing it, I suppose.

    I use an older ( Mid 2011 ) Mini with 10TB of storage connected directly to it via external HD's. Infuse for Appletv allows me to see all of my content on the externals by creating individual share drives for each one within the infuse App installed on all of my ATV's. What makes it nice is that Infuse's playback engine uses the ATV itself to do the transcoding so my computer doesn't have to get bogged down handling video streams. 

    I would assume most folks with 4K ATV's have some type of computer, and this is an easy and cheap way to put together a media server set up in your home. All you need is a working machine ( Mac or Windows ) , and external hard drive and an Appletv.  I think Infuse Pr0 lifetime is $5.99 a year.
    .. and access to somebody with sufficient IT skills. 

    Unlike, say, my 77 year old dad who wouldn't know what to do even if he had the outlay to spend on the extra kit to be able to do something like this.  It's bad enough with him and physical Blu-Ray disks.  He's only just upgraded to a 4K TV and (normal HD) Blu-Ray player.  Apple sells the iTunes store as a one-size-fits-all solution to buying and watching movies across your Apple devices easily (as do other digital content providers).   What my dad doesn't want to do is have another computer/device or storage device to worry about in order to keep his digital content safe.



    And that was the goal of the first Macintosh:  a simple, easy to use, uncomplicated home computer for the masses that didn't sacrifice functionality. 
    That was Job's claim to fame.   Unfortunately, iTunes seems to have gotten away from them a bit -- plus, entering the video market introduced partners who have proven to be difficult to work with.
  • Reply 80 of 80
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,306member
    mbdrake76 said:
    Yup, one can use a networked iTunes library on ATV today. 
    Okay, if we were to go down a NAS route: for sharing downloaded iTunes files what  If Apple were to bring out their own compact NAS unit that supported both Time Machine backups and iTunes library support which could automatically download iTunes content from a designated Apple ID as soon as it was purchased (or hit one button and it'd grab whatever wasn't already downloaded) and make it automatically configure any Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads to stream movies and TV shows from it when they're connected to the same network (Wi-Fi or ethernet).  Taking your Mac, iPhone or iPad somewhere - download movies or audio from the NAS directly into Apple TV or Apple Music app on your device locally rather than from Apple's own servers.  That would go some way of resolving the whole purchase/disappearing content problem.  You make the entire process as automatic as possible.  The user just plugs the thing in, configures networking and other settings via an iPadOS/iOS/macOS app, and that's it.  Oh, and add Apple Photos library support too.

    Add options to automatically back up the iTunes Library to a cloud service of the user's choosing (iCloud(*), Backblaze, Amazon, whatever), along with the ability to restore.  That way if the Apple NAS died, you'd just get a replacement and your library is redownloaded EITHER from Apple or through the backup service of your choice (which would be preferable if the content has vanished from the iTunes store).

    In short: a NAS that follows the Apple ethos of simplicity and practicality.  No fussing about.  

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.  A single device that manages Apple Media everything.  Is (hopefully) relatively inexpensive.   Just works.  A complete idiot could work it.

    * iCloud storage options would have to go beyond the current 2Tb ideally for those with large iTunes libraries.
    Although this is all moot as if AniMill’s correct than even if you’ve downloaded it, any pulled title flags as unplayable anyway. 
    You can't play iTunes Store content outside of Apple software, because duh.
    No I took the point to be that even if you’ve downloaded a title to your Mac on iTunes then if the studio pulls it from the Store then it will no longer be signed off, as it were, as playable. Which renders the whole download option moot? Sorry if I’ve misunderstood 
    Ah, I see. I don't believe that's the case, but I could be wrong. Similarly, if an app is pulled from the App Store, it doesn't stop you from being able to use it, it just prevents you from downloading it again later.
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