Apple explains why Microsoft xCloud won't be coming to the iPhone

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 47
    BeatsBeats Posts: 3,073member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Beats said:
    Microsoft thought they would get special treatment. They'll come along eventually. Android users hate paying for things and most knockoff devices have terrible quality screens and crap performance(Yes AI smart asses, I KNOW this is cloud computing, not the point).

    Admittedly I missed this line before posting the above:
    "App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud."

    What about video like Hulu?


    The Hulu app isn’t streamed. The Hulu content is. 

    I’m with Apple here, but I’m not sure how this would work. We can’t have the game devs being charged once by Apple and then charged again by Microsoft. They’ll have to split the one charge between them. 
    Good answer on the difference between streaming an app and streaming content through an app. However, it is still no dice. Microsoft would say that you are streaming a video game through the app just like you are streaming a movie through Netflix. Also, it isn't a payment issue at all. Microsoft has no problem paying 30% for Office 365 subscriptions, for example. The problem is that Apple requires all apps to be locally installed and run. 

    Why? Because it is a hardware company that shows off their great hardware. Moving to PWAs and cloud-based streaming apps ... benefits cloud companies like Microsoft and Google as well as products like Android and ChromeOS as a platform, because you can use very cheap hardware to serve as UIs for the services that live in the cloud. That is why the launch configuration for Stadia was a $70 Chromecast and a Wi-Fi controller. And why you can play it on any device with a Chrome browser and you can use your existing USB gamepad. Apple wants to use services to make more money off their hardware. Things like Stadia and xCloud are designed to replace their hardware and that doesn't fit their business model. And yes, this explains why Apple executives have been running various FUD campaigns like: "you need our products FOR SECURITY AND PRIVACY", "with Apple we sell you products but WITH GOOGLE YOU ARE THE PRODUCT", and "kids who use Chromebooks in public school instead of iPads WILL FAIL IN LIFE."

    Ironically Samsung is caught in the middle. They also need to showcase the importance of hardware so that people will buy their devices that cost 2-3 times as much as perfectly serviceable ones from Motorola, Nokia, TCL, Google etc. But they also need to partner with Microsoft and Google - who are at odds with that mission - in order to obtain the software and services that they can't develop on their own to make their devices viable alternatives to Apple devices. Earlier today I read an article that discussed how Microsoft worked with Samsung to make their Tab S devices capable alternatives to iPads for professionals by making sure that anything you can do with Office on an iPad Pro, you can do on a Galaxy Tab S (yes, Samsung sells their version of the Magic Keyboard, and theirs preceded the Apple version by several years). Thanks to that, Samsung tablets are the only ones worth buying for any reason other than streaming, reading and gaming (for which a $150 Amazon Fire HD 10 is all that is needed once you sideload the Google Play apps onto it). Google gives Samsung no real help on tablets because quite honestly they would rather you buy a Chromebook, but Google did put in a lot of work into getting the software right for Samsung's foldables. The problem is that Google's preference is for such devices to ultimately cost many hundress less, and will contribute to that effort by launching their own much cheaper foldable next year. 

    Ultimately, Google and Microsoft are software companies. Microsoft is a traditional desktop and server computing software company that is increasingly moving to a cloud services model like Google and Amazon where Google has always been a cloud services model. This means that increasingly both of them are only going to be interested in getting people to their cloud services and they could care less what devices you use to get there. Maybe Microsoft less so because they still have a very vested interest in selling Microsoft Windows licenses and XBox hardware. But they know that in the future that side of their business is going to be of diminishing importance whereas the bulk of their future revenue is going to be xCloud, Office 365 and selling Azure services. That is why thinking that Microsoft wants to be isolated from the 2 billion iOS devices, you aren't thinking clearly. (Now macOS is another story ... they can do without that 7% market share, and having to support their xCloud app on both Intel and ARM for macOS would just be another bother.) And no, they won't give in to Apple's terms - and neither will Google or Nvidia - because even if it is possible it doesn't fit their future ambitions.

    Nvidia too? Aren't they a hardware company? Well yes, but Nvidia wants to get more of their hardware into cloud data centers. Right now they are trying to convince that industry to offload some of the data center workloads onto GPUs ... which Nvidia makes. Also, Nvidia wants to get into making CPUs for data centers too ... hence their desire to purchase ARM. So whether it is cloud hardware like Nvidia or cloud software like Microsoft and Google, these companies have too much riding on their own business models to worry about helping Apple with theirs.
    Just to let you know: after you insisted that Apple would never design its own chips, after they’d been designing them for years, I only read the first line of you posts for sh*ts and giggles. 

    He claims Apple copies Samsung...
  • Reply 22 of 47
    BeatsBeats Posts: 3,073member
    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.


    Because if they allow one company to break the rules it opens the gates for everyone else.
  • Reply 23 of 47
    Sounds like a major cop out from Apple. 

    Just because Apple is terrible with services (cloud or otherwise), doesn’t mean others are. It’s always surprising how, despite Apple being the largest company in the world, they have no compunction providing horrible services that screw their most loyal fans, the fans that love Apple hardware and core software and want to stay fully in the Apple ecosystem. 

    Mail is still slow and terrible. Siri is still terrible (Apple, please fix the basic functioning before you add on another set of fun facts). HomeKit still doesn’t have decent router selection, doorbell selection (looks like one was just released), smoke detector selection (not available in US at least), etc. My Apple Music picks finally got good about 10 months ago, yet, Apple’s most social app still has pathetic social features. Also, how many decades of iTunes/music dominance will there need to be before Apple creates a karaoke app??
    elijahgInspiredCode
  • Reply 24 of 47
    Yeah this is some greedy anti-competitive nonsense form Apple here.  Their excuse about disallowing streaming content to “protect the customer” certainly doesn’t apply to how I am not “protected” from remoting into a Cloud based VM or other machine (logmein, chrome Remote Desktop, etc) and run apps and games that are not Apple approved.  

    This is just Apple being greedy and wanting a cut even though for whatever reason the games Microsoft is offering are some A-tier games that App Store games wouldn’t be able to compete with anyway.   They just don’t want customers to be lured away from their mediocre Apple Arcade subscription for one that may actually be more tempting to less casual gamers.    /shrug
    InspiredCodeelijahg
  • Reply 25 of 47
    Beats said:
    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.


    Because if they allow one company to break the rules it opens the gates for everyone else.
    They make the rules.  They can change them if they want.  The rules are already gerrymandered around particular apps.

    I would love game publishers to see iOS as a real platform for gaming. I would love to see games with more depth then candy crush. iOS should be compelling for gaming with powerful GPUs that can match an Xbox in top models. Unfortunately Apple does nothing but work against attracting gamers to the platform.
    edited August 2020 elijahgrazorpitBeats
  • Reply 26 of 47
    Rayz2016 said:

    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.

    It is often mentioned that Apple wants individual games to be listed in the store separately, but there are exceptions in the store.  For example the Jackbox Party Pack's are a collection of games in a single app. This is a good thing most of the time. I've hoped for some legal emulators by Nintendo or Sega. These should certainly be self contained apps.

    I hope that Microsoft will at least release the streaming app for home Xbox consoles. 
    Well, first, it’s not arbitrary. The rule is there to keep malware in the store down to a minimum. 

    Secondly, you’ve misunderstood the problem. Game collections aren’t the issue because they’re submitted for verification as a bundle. What MS wants to do is install an app that will stream other applications into an iDevice. These streamed applications have not been verified by Apple. 


    You may offer a single subscription that is shared across your own apps and services, but these subscriptions may not extend to third-party apps or services. Games offered in a game subscription must be owned or exclusively licensed by the developer (e.g. not part of a game publishing platform). Each game must be downloaded directly from the App Store, must be designed to avoid duplicate payment by a subscriber, and should not disadvantage non-subscriber customers.
    Now, you probably think, so what?

    So here’s a timely reminder of why Apple does this:

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/20/08/05/now-fixed-exploit-used-microsoft-office-macros-to-hack-macos

    Here we have an app (Microsoft Office) compromising iOS because it can programs that haven’t been checked. 

    It’s the  same reason why Apple won’t allow apps to streamed then run. 
    Seems as if you've misunderstood the problem.  Simply put MS is offering what Netflix, Hulu, HBO, Amazon Prime, and all of the other streaming services are offering.  That's it.  Streaming Ori and Will of the Wisps on XCloud is no different than streaming Blind Spot on Hulu, Doom Patrol on HBO, or the Boys on Amazon Prime.  The only difference is a game is more interactive than a movie but the control function of either is essentially the same in a streaming environment: 
    1. Game and movie are hosted on a remote server and streamed to device.
    2. User input for game (pew-pew, hack-slash)  or movie (Play, FF, RW, Pause) is relayed from user's control mechanism (controller or remote) back to remote server
    3.  Apple doesn't vet any of the content from the aforementioned streaming services.  That content is covered by the MPAA ratings.  Microsoft's content is covered by the ESRB ratings.

    Your red herring about an MS exploit is just that, a red herring.  It has absolutely nothing to do with why Apple won't allow streamed apps to run.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgLoveNotch_n_AirPods
  • Reply 27 of 47
    croprcropr Posts: 1,078member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Beats said:
    Microsoft thought they would get special treatment. They'll come along eventually. Android users hate paying for things and most knockoff devices have terrible quality screens and crap performance(Yes AI smart asses, I KNOW this is cloud computing, not the point).

    Admittedly I missed this line before posting the above:
    "App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud."

    What about video like Hulu?


    The Hulu app isn’t streamed. The Hulu content is. 

    I’m with Apple here, but I’m not sure how this would work. We can’t have the game devs being charged once by Apple and then charged again by Microsoft. They’ll have to split the one charge between them.

    A video streaming app like Netflix is an app that get its content (the movie)  form a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (change movie, rewind, forward, ...)

    A cloud gaming app like Microsoft xCloud is an app that get its content (the game content) from a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (move, shoot,  ...)

    I am not a Microsoft fan,  and the X-Box is also a closed gaming system, but Microsoft has a point.  The difference of treatment in the App Store between Netflix and Microsoft xCloud is just pathetic.

    What is Netflix or another provider,  comes with interactive movies, where 2 or more scenarios are streamed depending on user input.  The difference between video streaming and gaming will become more blurry


    muthuk_vanalingamLoveNotch_n_AirPods
  • Reply 28 of 47
    mr lizardmr lizard Posts: 352member
    App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud”

    Guess they’d better shut down Netflix, Prime, and Spotify then. After all, as Tim Cook swore under oath last week, Apple treats all developers equally with the same rules to ensure an equal playing field, right? 
    elijahgmuthuk_vanalingamLoveNotch_n_AirPods
  • Reply 29 of 47
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,572member
    mr lizard said:
    “App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud”

    Guess they’d better shut down Netflix, Prime, and Spotify then. After all, as Tim Cook swore under oath last week, Apple treats all developers equally with the same rules to ensure an equal playing field, right? 

    Not the same thing at all. Those apps stream "passive" content (audio and video files), not executable code (games); they do not rely on streaming from the cloud as part of their execution. All the code needed to run is contained in the app bundled that is downloaded by the user from the AppStore.
    GG1roundaboutnowDetnator
  • Reply 30 of 47
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,572member

    cropr said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Beats said:
    Microsoft thought they would get special treatment. They'll come along eventually. Android users hate paying for things and most knockoff devices have terrible quality screens and crap performance(Yes AI smart asses, I KNOW this is cloud computing, not the point).

    Admittedly I missed this line before posting the above:
    "App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud."

    What about video like Hulu?


    The Hulu app isn’t streamed. The Hulu content is. 

    I’m with Apple here, but I’m not sure how this would work. We can’t have the game devs being charged once by Apple and then charged again by Microsoft. They’ll have to split the one charge between them.

    A video streaming app like Netflix is an app that get its content (the movie)  form a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (change movie, rewind, forward, ...)

    A cloud gaming app like Microsoft xCloud is an app that get its content (the game content) from a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (move, shoot,  ...)

    I am not a Microsoft fan,  and the X-Box is also a closed gaming system, but Microsoft has a point.  The difference of treatment in the App Store between Netflix and Microsoft xCloud is just pathetic.

    What is Netflix or another provider,  comes with interactive movies, where 2 or more scenarios are streamed depending on user input.  The difference between video streaming and gaming will become more blurry


    Rayz2016 said:

    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.

    It is often mentioned that Apple wants individual games to be listed in the store separately, but there are exceptions in the store.  For example the Jackbox Party Pack's are a collection of games in a single app. This is a good thing most of the time. I've hoped for some legal emulators by Nintendo or Sega. These should certainly be self contained apps.

    I hope that Microsoft will at least release the streaming app for home Xbox consoles. 
    Well, first, it’s not arbitrary. The rule is there to keep malware in the store down to a minimum. 

    Secondly, you’ve misunderstood the problem. Game collections aren’t the issue because they’re submitted for verification as a bundle. What MS wants to do is install an app that will stream other applications into an iDevice. These streamed applications have not been verified by Apple. 


    You may offer a single subscription that is shared across your own apps and services, but these subscriptions may not extend to third-party apps or services. Games offered in a game subscription must be owned or exclusively licensed by the developer (e.g. not part of a game publishing platform). Each game must be downloaded directly from the App Store, must be designed to avoid duplicate payment by a subscriber, and should not disadvantage non-subscriber customers.
    Now, you probably think, so what?

    So here’s a timely reminder of why Apple does this:

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/20/08/05/now-fixed-exploit-used-microsoft-office-macros-to-hack-macos

    Here we have an app (Microsoft Office) compromising iOS because it can programs that haven’t been checked. 

    It’s the  same reason why Apple won’t allow apps to streamed then run. 
    Seems as if you've misunderstood the problem.  Simply put MS is offering what Netflix, Hulu, HBO, Amazon Prime, and all of the other streaming services are offering.  That's it.  Streaming Ori and Will of the Wisps on XCloud is no different than streaming Blind Spot on Hulu, Doom Patrol on HBO, or the Boys on Amazon Prime.  The only difference is a game is more interactive than a movie but the control function of either is essentially the same in a streaming environment: 
    1. Game and movie are hosted on a remote server and streamed to device.
    2. User input for game (pew-pew, hack-slash)  or movie (Play, FF, RW, Pause) is relayed from user's control mechanism (controller or remote) back to remote server
    3.  Apple doesn't vet any of the content from the aforementioned streaming services.  That content is covered by the MPAA ratings.  Microsoft's content is covered by the ESRB ratings.

    Your red herring about an MS exploit is just that, a red herring.  It has absolutely nothing to do with why Apple won't allow streamed apps to run.

    First of all, you're making way too many assumptions on how xCloud actually works. It is obviously not the way you think it is, because even Microsoft knows they cannot bring their service to iOS the way it currently works. I'm going out on a very short limb and guessing that xCloud does indeed download actual code in order to run games. Be it some proprietary bit code or micro code that is then translated to execute on the target platform. This type of thing has never been allowed on iOS.

    Interactive movies do not need to download executable code in order to work. The supporting app already has all the code needed to detect "triggers" in the content and react appropriately. That code was downloaded as part of the app bundle when the user originally downloaded the app from the AppStore.

    And let's not forget, that Apple did not deny the xCloud app - there isn't even one to deny. This is Microsoft saying under current AppStore policies, they cannot bring their service to iOS devices.
    edited August 2020 GG1roundaboutnowDetnator
  • Reply 31 of 47
    Sigh.

    2. I have told you this before. iPhones are knockoffs of Samsung phones now and have been since 2014.

    "Citation needed."

    Do you have evidence to support this contention?
    edited August 2020 Detnator
  • Reply 32 of 47
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    Rayz2016 said:
    razorpit said:
    Does Sony get a pass because the games are being played on a device that is owned by the user? The PS Remote Play is not perfect, but definitely serviceable.
    According to original writer, yes. Remote Play works because it’s playing through another device on the same network. 
    One minor correction you can play when connected to a different network. At least you use too. That might have changed. My son did it last year while we were on vacation.

  • Reply 33 of 47
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Essentially, "streaming from the cloud" means the software and data are all in the cloud and you access it from your device as if it resided on your device.

    If Apple is serious about protecting their user's privacy and security (and they are), then how do they do that while relinquishing all control to owners of that particular cloud?
    Apple would have no visibility or control over any parts of it.
    tmay
  • Reply 34 of 47
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    Beats said:
    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.


    Because if they allow one company to break the rules it opens the gates for everyone else.
    They make the rules.  They can change them if they want.  The rules are already gerrymandered around particular apps.

    I would love game publishers to see iOS as a real platform for gaming. I would love to see games with more depth then candy crush. iOS should be compelling for gaming with powerful GPUs that can match an Xbox in top models. Unfortunately Apple does nothing but work against attracting gamers to the platform.
    Back when they started allowing you to install apps on AppleTV and a few manufacturers released controllers I thought, ok here we go now, but nope. Nothing. I don’t understand it. 
  • Reply 35 of 47
    Nothing to see here. Just Apple stifling competition. Who would pay for the crap mobile games or Apple Arcade when they can play real xbox games via your phone? No one. 
    edited August 2020
  • Reply 36 of 47
    ctt_zhctt_zh Posts: 29member
    mjtomlin said:

    cropr said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    Beats said:
    Microsoft thought they would get special treatment. They'll come along eventually. Android users hate paying for things and most knockoff devices have terrible quality screens and crap performance(Yes AI smart asses, I KNOW this is cloud computing, not the point).

    Admittedly I missed this line before posting the above:
    "App Store guidelines state that an app can't rely on streaming from the cloud."

    What about video like Hulu?


    The Hulu app isn’t streamed. The Hulu content is. 

    I’m with Apple here, but I’m not sure how this would work. We can’t have the game devs being charged once by Apple and then charged again by Microsoft. They’ll have to split the one charge between them.

    A video streaming app like Netflix is an app that get its content (the movie)  form a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (change movie, rewind, forward, ...)

    A cloud gaming app like Microsoft xCloud is an app that get its content (the game content) from a cloud server.  The app has buttons to control the content (move, shoot,  ...)

    I am not a Microsoft fan,  and the X-Box is also a closed gaming system, but Microsoft has a point.  The difference of treatment in the App Store between Netflix and Microsoft xCloud is just pathetic.

    What is Netflix or another provider,  comes with interactive movies, where 2 or more scenarios are streamed depending on user input.  The difference between video streaming and gaming will become more blurry


    Rayz2016 said:

    This is frustrating because it feels very arbitrary. Apple likes to say everyone needs to follow the same rules, but is it really that bad to make an exception when a large number of users want it to happen.  Making unpopular decisions based on strictly following rules that Apple themselves wrote isn't a great way to win hearts and minds.

    It is often mentioned that Apple wants individual games to be listed in the store separately, but there are exceptions in the store.  For example the Jackbox Party Pack's are a collection of games in a single app. This is a good thing most of the time. I've hoped for some legal emulators by Nintendo or Sega. These should certainly be self contained apps.

    I hope that Microsoft will at least release the streaming app for home Xbox consoles. 
    Well, first, it’s not arbitrary. The rule is there to keep malware in the store down to a minimum. 

    Secondly, you’ve misunderstood the problem. Game collections aren’t the issue because they’re submitted for verification as a bundle. What MS wants to do is install an app that will stream other applications into an iDevice. These streamed applications have not been verified by Apple. 


    You may offer a single subscription that is shared across your own apps and services, but these subscriptions may not extend to third-party apps or services. Games offered in a game subscription must be owned or exclusively licensed by the developer (e.g. not part of a game publishing platform). Each game must be downloaded directly from the App Store, must be designed to avoid duplicate payment by a subscriber, and should not disadvantage non-subscriber customers.
    Now, you probably think, so what?

    So here’s a timely reminder of why Apple does this:

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/20/08/05/now-fixed-exploit-used-microsoft-office-macros-to-hack-macos

    Here we have an app (Microsoft Office) compromising iOS because it can programs that haven’t been checked. 

    It’s the  same reason why Apple won’t allow apps to streamed then run. 
    Seems as if you've misunderstood the problem.  Simply put MS is offering what Netflix, Hulu, HBO, Amazon Prime, and all of the other streaming services are offering.  That's it.  Streaming Ori and Will of the Wisps on XCloud is no different than streaming Blind Spot on Hulu, Doom Patrol on HBO, or the Boys on Amazon Prime.  The only difference is a game is more interactive than a movie but the control function of either is essentially the same in a streaming environment: 
    1. Game and movie are hosted on a remote server and streamed to device.
    2. User input for game (pew-pew, hack-slash)  or movie (Play, FF, RW, Pause) is relayed from user's control mechanism (controller or remote) back to remote server
    3.  Apple doesn't vet any of the content from the aforementioned streaming services.  That content is covered by the MPAA ratings.  Microsoft's content is covered by the ESRB ratings.

    Your red herring about an MS exploit is just that, a red herring.  It has absolutely nothing to do with why Apple won't allow streamed apps to run.

    First of all, you're making way too many assumptions on how xCloud actually works. It is obviously not the way you think it is, because even Microsoft knows they cannot bring their service to iOS the way it currently works. I'm going out on a very short limb and guessing that xCloud does indeed download actual code in order to run games. Be it some proprietary bit code or micro code that is then translated to execute on the target platform. This type of thing has never been allowed on iOS.

    Interactive movies do not need to download executable code in order to work. The supporting app already has all the code needed to detect "triggers" in the content and react appropriately. That code was downloaded as part of the app bundle when the user originally downloaded the app from the AppStore.

    And let's not forget, that Apple did not deny the xCloud app - there isn't even one to deny. This is Microsoft saying under current AppStore policies, they cannot bring their service to iOS devices.
    Why do you assume the proprietary bit code isn't already in the XBox Game Pass App that has been installed on device?  
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 37 of 47
    ctt_zh said:
    Why do you assume the proprietary bit code isn't already in the XBox Game Pass App that has been installed on device?  
    If that were true, the app would have to do one of two things:
    1. Demand that all the games offered by the service use exactly the same set of code routines.
    2. Include all the code for every single game offered in the app.
    Neither of those seems feasible to me given the wide range of game types being offered on xCloud, along with the large number of different developers actually creating those games.

  • Reply 38 of 47
    ctt_zhctt_zh Posts: 29member
    ctt_zh said:
    Why do you assume the proprietary bit code isn't already in the XBox Game Pass App that has been installed on device?  
    If that were true, the app would have to do one of two things:
    1. Demand that all the games offered by the service use exactly the same set of code routines.
    2. Include all the code for every single game offered in the app.
    Neither of those seems feasible to me given the wide range of game types being offered on xCloud, along with the large number of different developers actually creating those games.


    It's difficult to get a definitive answer to how it works but I think the following would be accurate (in-line with cropr and CloudTalkin's viewpoints). 

    The games run in the Azure cloud, they are simply rendered on device. No code for any game needs to be included on device, only the code to start the process of handshaking with xCloud (this code would be in the XBox Game Pass App). The following would (at minimum) need to be sent from device to the xCloud:

    1. UserID
    2. GameID
    3. DeviceType - OS / Screen Size
    4. Controller Type

    All other user information is stored in the cloud. The xCloud Azure VM would get the user data, start the game and send it to the user device. User controls would be relayed to the VM which would interpret them according to the game being played and the Controller Type. Game Play / scores etc. would be stored in the xCloud for later use.

    The games would not need to use the same set of code routines. All code for every single game offered in the app would not need to be included.

    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 39 of 47
    TheNubiTheNubi Posts: 19member
    All it’s doing is sending the video down to your device and sending back user input. Not a whole lot different than what you already do with Netflix, Hulu, YouTube etc when you scrub through videos. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 40 of 47
    And this exists already - Black Mirror Bandersnatch and a few other interactive videos on Netflix are already basically Choose Your Own Adventures, not all that different from a Telltale Interactive game like Walking Dead where you pick your path.  And they are allowed (the ATV version of Netflix had an issue but the iOS version worked).
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