Facebook is pushing for Apple to open up default messaging app options

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 47
    DoomFreakDoomFreak Posts: 19unconfirmed, member
    I would hope that Apple would never open up default messaging to Facebook.  It seems contrary to its goals of creating a secure and private environment for its customers.  If someone wants to use that crap, let them.  At some point you have to protect people from themselves though.
    Bart Ywatto_cobrafrantisek
  • Reply 22 of 47
    There is a universal protocol called RCS that could replace SMS/MMS, but it is up to the cellular carriers to implement it. Here is an article from last year:

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/24/20931202/us-carriers-rcs-cross-carrier-messaging-initiative-ccmi-att-tmobile-sprint-verizon

    Don’t hold your breath! Apple is not likely to adopt it anytime soon. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 47
    No way.


    Messanger is awful
    Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 47
    Shut the Zuck up.
    steve_jobsBart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 47
    Shut the Zuck up.
    rather on the contrary :lol: 
    edited September 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 47
    crowley said:
    I don't really understand the request.  Click on a link and open your default browser.  Click on an email address open your default mail app.  What are you clicking on to open the default messaging app?  There is no universal messaging ID so this doesn't seem like a problem.  Phone numbers are the closest, but I don't think Facebook Messenger works witha phone number anywa, though WhatsApp, a Facebook company, does.

    Facebook can quite easily implement a schema for opening Facebook Messenger via a link.
    Actually, there is an app in the App Store for Messenger. Just like other apps, you can set location and notifications when you get a message. I used it for a while but then the majority of my acquaintances got iPhones and we use Apple's app
    Bart Y
  • Reply 27 of 47
    Why would I trust Facebook with my texts? Does Facebook Messenger process SMS? Is Messenger end-to-end encrypted?
    Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 47
    They should resurrect that failed Facebook phone thingy they tried and put it on there. Lmao!!!
    edited September 2020 Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 47
    ralphie said:
    Messenger can’t be used for SMS. So no. 
    While that is true, mainly it won't can't happen is because there is no universal protocol for messages (unlike mail and web), so its not like all messages can be routed to a single message app.  FB is just being a PITA.
    There is a universal protocol for messages (advanced texting) which could or would eventually replace SMS/MMS. It is called RCS, but it has failed to be adopted by cellular carriers due to its complexity amongst other things. It is a nightmare. 

    Google is attempting to host RCS as it has given up on the carriers. https://jibe.google.com/

    Here is an article on what US carriers are envisioning: https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/24/20931202/us-carriers-rcs-cross-carrier-messaging-initiative-ccmi-att-tmobile-sprint-verizon

    I wouldn’t hold your breath on the success of RCS anytime soon. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 47
    Screw Facebook and Zuckerturd and Sandberg.

    Only one person (orange skin and a comb over) has done more to destroy America and Democracy than Zuckerberg has.

    Apple and Amazon  are angels compared to this traitor to democracy.
    Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 47
    There’s no bloody way I want Facebook anywhere in my phone much less integrated into Messages. There’s a Facebook Messenger app just like WhatsApp, Viber, Signal and all the others. They can be in a level playing field with the rest of the third parties. 
    ╭∩╮(︶︿︶)╭∩╮ Zuckerberg
    edited September 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 47

    sflocal said:
    FB is being that whiny little brat.

    I find it amazing that for the total market share that the iPhone has globally (small), companies like Facebook (and banks, and countries) are demanding that Apple open's up it's closed platform to other competitors.
    You may find it amazing based on a simple measure like market of devices online. That measure is almost meaningless. What matters is the share of economic activity conducted on Apple devices and the demographic profiles of those involved in that activity.

    On average, those numbers are startling higher and more attractive to businesses than any other platform. If you think back to when war with Samsung was raging and the android crowd was ranting and raving about their huge market share it was pointed out so what, Apple had 95% of the industry's profits. The money is in Apple's system. Apple is so economically superior to any other platform that it is laughable  you would "find it amazing" these other companies are demanding Apple open up to them. If they weren't demanding this they should fired for incompetence.


    Bart Ywatto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 47
    Bart YBart Y Posts: 42unconfirmed, member
    Here’s a few Messenger “features” that let FB access your personal and contact’s info, from a Lifewire article:

    “Another great thing about sharing images and videos through Messenger is that the app and website collect all the media files so you can quickly sift through them.”

    “Messenger functions as a simple way to send money to people using just your debit card information. You can do this from both the website and the mobile app.”

    “Messenger lets you play games within the app or Messenger.com website, even while in a group message. You don’t have to download another app or visit another website to start playing with other Messenger users.”

    “Instead of using a dedicated app to show someone where you are, you can let recipients follow your location for up to an hour with Messenger’s built-in location-sharing feature, which only works from the mobile app.”

    “Although Messenger doesn’t have a calendar, it does let you create event reminders through the Reminders button on the mobile app. Another neat way to do it is to send a message that contains a reference to a day, and the app automatically asks you if you want to make a reminder.”

    “Add new Messenger contacts by inviting contacts from your phone or, if you’re on Facebook, your Facebook friends. There’s also a custom Scan Code you can grab from within the app and share with others, who can then scan your code to add you to their Messenger instantly.”

    So Facebook gathers your media (and can Facial Recognize people), accesses your debit card (and by extension your checking account) info, play games outside of the App Store system, gives away your location as you move, collects event data, can access your entire contact list and add (recruit) new users, just to name a few.

    Gee, who gets to benefit from all these “features”? And whose info get analyzed and shared (sold) by Facebook to ad companies and others? And who “guards” this data?

    No thanks, I’m not willing to give away my info or the info of others I know. Messenger is an info gathering and recruiting platform rather than a general communication service.

    But if iOS users want to freely give up that info, I hope Apple forces FB to disclose, at every decision point, what users are allowing access to. And the option to opt out.

    edited September 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 47
    KrustyOne said:
    Apple should just release iMessage for Android! 
    Everyone but Facebook and Google would benefit from this move. 
    They actually offered to make it cross platform initially and there was no interest so they went it alone and made it differentiator. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 47
    They need to STFU!!!
    Don’t respond so juvenile. I dislike Facebook like many here as they are hypocritical if you look at their own business practices, but they do have a point here. Opening up “default apps” selectively to just the Browser and Mail, but not music, maps, messaging, etc, only accentuates the fact Apple’s behavior is anti competitive. 

    They have become so huge that an App Store is not just an App Store anymore (imagine you could only rent a house from one of the two private companies in the world), and the ability to not allow users to select their default apps system wide is putting Apple’s financial interests over consumer choice and free market values. 

    In fact, Apple has built in this “default app” feature just to prepare for legal antitrust actions  against them, so that when they are finally forced to change, they just do a quick iOS update to include other app types. This is terrible behavior from Apple’s part and legal action is way overdue.
  • Reply 36 of 47
    Likely we'll never know, but it would be interesting to know what % of people end up changing their default mail & browser.

    I'd guess it's pretty low.
    Yes and I think that once Apple finally allows all app types to be opened up like this, the next step would be to legally force Apple to allow apps to ask for a “default change” unless users turn that off, or if that is more user friendly, a more centralized and accessible settings menu. 

    Apple has buried the current settings deliberately, so they know it won’t cannibalize their monopolistic position. 
  • Reply 37 of 47
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,912member
    I can see it now. endless "Messanger isn't your default message app, agree to continue" popups.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 47
    DangDave said:
    There is a universal protocol called RCS that could replace SMS/MMS, but it is up to the cellular carriers to implement it. Here is an article from last year:

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/24/20931202/us-carriers-rcs-cross-carrier-messaging-initiative-ccmi-att-tmobile-sprint-verizon

    Don’t hold your breath! Apple is not likely to adopt it anytime soon. 
    There are more carriers this impacts than just the USA. There is the rest of the world to consider. Until such a measure is adopted by the ITU then Apple is wise to keep its powder dry.
    The last thing we want as users is a repeat of the debacle when half the phones sold in the US (CDMA) won't in say Europe, Africa, India etc.
    And GSM phones from most of the world can only roam on a few carriers in the USA.
    At the moment, I can send a text/sms to my cousin in the middle of Austrailia and know that it will reach him. He uses an ancient Nokia 3310. It is rugged and he can swap batteries when on the go across his farm that covers an area of well over 1000sq miles. He gets 2G/3G signal over most of it. Forget 4G or 5G it ain't gonna happen out there.
    Adding an incompatible protocol is just going to make a lot of people very angry. Just like replacing iMessage with some POS from Zuck and friends.
    Is there a prize to see who can put forward the most stupid idea of the month?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 39 of 47
    What would be really needed is GSM consortium creates universal IP based messaging protocol like iMessage to extend SMS functionality and take over SMS in future.
    Not more facebook sh....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 40 of 47
    They have become so huge that an App Store is not just an App Store anymore (imagine you could only rent a house from one of the two private companies in the world), and the ability to not allow users to select their default apps system wide is putting Apple’s financial interests over consumer choice and free market values. 

    In fact, Apple has built in this “default app” feature just to prepare for legal antitrust actions  against them, so that when they are finally forced to change, they just do a quick iOS update to include other app types. This is terrible behavior from Apple’s part and legal action is way overdue.
    They may be huge but they are nowhere near a monopoly.  Last time I checked, the largest smartphone OS by far is Android.  To do what you want to do, the laws need to be drastically changed such that competitive success (i.e. being favored by customers), not monopoly power (i.e. customers have no other choice), is the trigger for antitrust enforcement.  That is the most inane and ignorant policy idea anyone one can come up with.  It completely subverts the free enterprise incentive system. 
    Xedwatto_cobra
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