Analysts worry about UK 5G support in 'iPhone 12'

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  • Reply 21 of 29
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,608member
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    GeorgeBMactmay
  • Reply 22 of 29
    cg27cg27 Posts: 168member

    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    The point of this thread is lack of cellular coverage in rural areas.  Offer a thirsty soul in the middle of the desert a cup with a narrow straw - I don’t think they’d mind.  It’s early days for 5G and StarLink, and each will have their pros and cons.

    And FWIW I bet Tesla will one day offer some sort of StarLink bundle or services that other OEMs will not be able to compete with, even GM’s OnStar.
    edited October 2020
  • Reply 23 of 29
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,608member
    cg27 said:
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    The point of this thread is lack of cellular coverage in rural areas.  Offer a thirsty soul in the middle of the desert a cup with a narrow straw - I don’t think they’d mind.  It’s early days for 5G and StarLink, and each will have their pros and cons.

    And FWIW I bet Tesla will one day offer some sort of StarLink bundle or services that other OEMs will not be able to compete with, even GM’s OnStar.
    True, but if all you're looking for is coverage, you don't need 5G. 4G/LTE is plenty good enough, (as many have commented, most people really don't need 5G at all,) and there's nothing preventing StarLink from creating a 4G satellite service.
  • Reply 24 of 29
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    The point of this thread is lack of cellular coverage in rural areas.  Offer a thirsty soul in the middle of the desert a cup with a narrow straw - I don’t think they’d mind.  It’s early days for 5G and StarLink, and each will have their pros and cons.

    And FWIW I bet Tesla will one day offer some sort of StarLink bundle or services that other OEMs will not be able to compete with, even GM’s OnStar.
    True, but if all you're looking for is coverage, you don't need 5G. 4G/LTE is plenty good enough, (as many have commented, most people really don't need 5G at all,) and there's nothing preventing StarLink from creating a 4G satellite service.

    By the same logic (or rather the lack of), "most people really don't need" smart phones at all....
    But then, after Tuesday, those "many [who] have commented" will likely stop commenting....
  • Reply 25 of 29
    About 10per cent of the UK can’t get reliable 4G. In my house I can’t even get 3G let alone 4G. 
    No 4G coverage outside the house either - and that would be needed for wifi-calling.
    I only care about 5G for if and when it increases coverage so I can sit on my sofa and call someone.
    I think I’ll have a long wait...


  • Reply 26 of 29
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    aderutter said:
    About 10per cent of the UK can’t get reliable 4G. In my house I can’t even get 3G let alone 4G. 
    No 4G coverage outside the house either - and that would be needed for wifi-calling.
    I only care about 5G for if and when it increases coverage so I can sit on my sofa and call someone.
    I think I’ll have a long wait...



    The 90% likely disagree.
    But, as long as coverage is determined solely by its profitability, then some segment of the population is bound to be excluded.   It works the same in healthcare, but the UK addressed problem long ago.   Perhaps they should give the same attention to coverage.
  • Reply 27 of 29
    cg27cg27 Posts: 168member
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    The point of this thread was lack of cellular coverage in rural areas.  Offer a thirsty soul in the middle of the desert a cup with a narrow straw - I don’t think they’d mind.  It’s early days for 5G and cellular, and each will have their pros and cons.

    FWIW I bet Tesla will one day offer some sort of StarLink bundle or services that other OEMs will not be able to compete with, even GM’s OnStar.
  • Reply 28 of 29
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    cg27 said:
    MplsP said:
    cg27 said:
    larryjw said:
    Wouldn’t be just dandy if the carriers in the US would actually provide signal to areas other than the big cities and along the interstate? 

    It’s like my phone bill is taxed fees every month to provide cellular service to “rural” areas, but nothing is ever provided. It’s almost like these fees are just subsides to the phone companies who turn around and give them to their investors and politicians. 

    No, instead, we spend for tech we don’t need, instead of tech we do need. 

    Why would they?   That's a money losing proposition.

    A century ago the U.S. faced the same predicament with electricity.   They solved it back then with government programs such as the TVA.   But that was back when America saw itself as a growing and promising nation and was willing to invest in itself and its future.
    This is where the SpaceX StarLink network of satellites that is being deployed will earn its keep -  rural internet, which could help with rural calls, globally.  
    Except one of the benefits being touted by 5G advocates is low latencies. What will a satellite link do for latencies?
    The point of this thread was lack of cellular coverage in rural areas.  Offer a thirsty soul in the middle of the desert a cup with a narrow straw - I don’t think they’d mind.  It’s early days for 5G and cellular, and each will have their pros and cons.

    FWIW I bet Tesla will one day offer some sort of StarLink bundle or services that other OEMs will not be able to compete with, even GM’s OnStar.

    That's likely already in the works.    Never bet against Elon Musk.   He doesn't think small.   And GM has been a pretty low bar to clear for decades.
  • Reply 29 of 29
    Well, iPhone 12 supports the n28 band so no worries now. 
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