Qualcomm teases Snapdragon X65 5G 10Gbps modem for 2022 iPhone

Posted:
in iPhone edited February 9
Qualcomm has introduced its latest 5G modem, the Snapdragon X65, a chip that could help provide Apple's 2022 iPhone with cellular speeds of up to 10Gbps.




In its latest annual modem release, the Snapdragon X65 is a 5G-compatable modem that follows on from the previous model, the Snapdragon X60. The fourth-generation modem is claimed to be the first to reach 10-gigabit 5G connection speeds, which can potentially mean faster downloads to consumers if carrier conditions are favorable.

The modem is also the first 3GPP Release 16 modem-RF system, supporting the latest specification from 3GPP that offers various improvements to cellular connectivity. This includes specifications relating to power consumption and MIMO usage.

The modem is said to have an upgradable architecture to add software features and capabilities as part of the 3GPP Release 16 rollout. This can increase speeds further or introduce entirely new features.

The module is engineered to pair with Qualcomm's QTM545 mmWave antenna module pairs, which can support a higher transmit power.

There is also the bold claim of it having the world's first "AI antenna tuning technology," which could further enhance connectivity. By using AI, Qualcomm claims it can detect hand grips with 30% more accuracy, allowing the modem to switch antennas for better signal.

Qualcomm's 5G PowerSave 2.0 is also included, using 3GPP Release 16 power-saving initiatives such as Connected-Mode Wake-Up Signal. It also has Smart Transmit 2.0, a "system-level technology" to increase upload data speeds and enhance coverage, while remaining within RF emissions requirements.

Qualcomm has started to provide samples of the modem to vendors, with a view to its inclusion in devices staring in late 2021.

Apple is almost certain to use the modem in a future iPhone, but its schedule for production and legal filings discussing the Qualcomm release timeline make it certain that it will appear in the 2022 model, rather than the 2021 releases. The X60 is anticipated to appear in the upcoming "iPhone 13" models.

The chip producer has enjoyed high sales due to Apple's iPhone, which it supplies Apple as part of a settlement of billion-dollar legal battles. However, Apple is known to be working on its own modem designs, which could appear in future iPhone models down the road.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    neilmneilm Posts: 914member
    10-gigabit 5G connection speeds, which can potentially mean faster downloads to consumers if carrier conditions are favorable.
    So if pigs fly, basically.
    beowulfschmidtlkruppMplsPkkqd1337GG1watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 10
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,357member
    neilm said:
    10-gigabit 5G connection speeds, which can potentially mean faster downloads to consumers if carrier conditions are favorable.
    So if pigs fly, basically.
    Exactly - The carriers will have one antenna in a handful of cities and measure speeds 6 feet away so they can claim they have ‘the fastest connection speeds.’

    What I care about is:
    - power efficiency. I don’t to be wasting power looking for a useless 5G signal that still doesn’t exist.
    - the ability to get a good connection with a weak signal. There are large areas of the U.S. where you get 2 bars max, including indoors in metropolitan areas with ‘excellent’ coverage. I’d rather have a modem and antenna that performs well in these circumstances than one that can deplete my data plan in 5 minutes ‘if conditions are right.’
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 10
    davendaven Posts: 626member
    So I can download a full length 4k movie in a second or so? Yeah, like I'm really going to do that 60 times a minute, 60 times an hour, for 8 hours a day because I have no life. Seriously, what difference will it make?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 10
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,591member
    Everyone who wonders about 5G safety should watch this excellent video:


    argonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 10
    MplsP said:
    neilm said:
    10-gigabit 5G connection speeds, which can potentially mean faster downloads to consumers if carrier conditions are favorable.
    So if pigs fly, basically.
    Exactly - The carriers will have one antenna in a handful of cities and measure speeds 6 feet away so they can claim they have ‘the fastest connection speeds.’

    What I care about is:
    - power efficiency. I don’t to be wasting power looking for a useless 5G signal that still doesn’t exist.
    - the ability to get a good connection with a weak signal. There are large areas of the U.S. where you get 2 bars max, including indoors in metropolitan areas with ‘excellent’ coverage. I’d rather have a modem and antenna that performs well in these circumstances than one that can deplete my data plan in 5 minutes ‘if conditions are right.’
    If those are the things you care about, then you will be a fan of the upcoming X60 in the iPhone 13 and the X65 discussed in this article.  Beyond the headline garnering speed boost, the "X65 modem has many other benefits, too, including improved power efficiency, enhanced coverage for both mmWave and sub-6 GHz bands, and support for all global commercialized mmWave frequencies, including the new n259 (41 GHz) band.
    As with the previous-generation Snapdragon X60, the X65 can aggregate data from mmWave and sub-6GHz bands simultaneously to achieve an optimal combination of high-speed and low-latency coverage. The modem is paired with Qualcomm's new fourth-generation mmWave antenna module for extended mmWave coverage and power efficiency. " - Macrumors 
    muthuk_vanalingamappleexpat
  • Reply 6 of 10
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,658member
    Everyone who wonders about 5G safety should watch this excellent video:



    If mmWave was treated not as a network technology but a peer to peer technology used in limited situations there wouldn't be controversy as far as I can see.
    It's the broad non-descript application that is the problem well that and networks keep doing the handwave it's safe (at least here in Australia) but only talk about why sub-6 is safe even though it is very different.
    edited February 9 argonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 10
    By the time the carriers can actually provide these speeds, Apple will have their own chip and they’ll be showing it off in the new Apple car.
    danoxwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 10
    daven said:
    So I can download a full length 4k movie in a second or so? Yeah, like I'm really going to do that 60 times a minute, 60 times an hour, for 8 hours a day because I have no life. Seriously, what difference will it make?

    The difference it makes — drumroll please — is that it's "not just about you", but about the network, and servicing all users. The sooner your device can connet, download and disconnect, the more network bandwidth is freed up for other users, or other apps on your device. Better for everyone.
    muthuk_vanalingamargonaut
  • Reply 9 of 10
    MplsP said:
    neilm said:
    10-gigabit 5G connection speeds, which can potentially mean faster downloads to consumers if carrier conditions are favorable.
    So if pigs fly, basically.
    Exactly - The carriers will have one antenna in a handful of cities and measure speeds 6 feet away so they can claim they have ‘the fastest connection speeds.’

    What I care about is:
    - power efficiency. I don’t to be wasting power looking for a useless 5G signal that still doesn’t exist.
    - the ability to get a good connection with a weak signal. There are large areas of the U.S. where you get 2 bars max, including indoors in metropolitan areas with ‘excellent’ coverage. I’d rather have a modem and antenna that performs well in these circumstances than one that can deplete my data plan in 5 minutes ‘if conditions are right.’

    My grandson, living in a suburban/rural area south of Pittsburgh reports that his 5G is working well under Sprint.  He tells me that when the 4G signal tails off (which happens often down there) his iPhone 12 picks up a 5G signal.   He is quite happy with it.

    But then Sprint/T-Mobile took the opposite approach from Verizon:  instead of limited high speed coverage in urban areas they are rolling out moderate speeds over wide areas.

    It's good to have choice.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 10
    10Gbps?
    That's over 100x faster than my cable.

    It'll be nice to cut back to only one bill.   I can't wait to see those transmitters going up on the telephone poles around my house.  With 3 of them within 50-75 feet of my house I should get pretty good coverage.
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