Zuckerberg wants to 'inflict pain' on Apple for privacy changes

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 76
    danoxdanox Posts: 955member
    jguther said:
    Make the world a better place - shut down facebook.
    There is nothing wrong with Facebook, what wrong is Apple putting up with them or Epic, treat them like Flash and move on.....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 62 of 76
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,991member
    I’ve been wondering. Just how could Facebook ‘inflict pain’ on Apple? Pull their app from the iOS platform? Wouldn’t that hurt Facebook more than Apple?
    edited February 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 63 of 76
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,850member
    lkrupp said:
    I’ve been wondering. Just how could Facebook ‘inflict pain’ on Apple? Pull their app from the iOS platform? Wouldn’t that hurt Facebook more than Apple?

    That would save the world and Apple Customers a whole mass of battery life and storage. Facebook App should have been kicked out of store for resource abuse years ago.
    argonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 64 of 76
    Zuck sounds more and more like trump every day. Wah wah wah. Why can’t I get my way? 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 65 of 76
    FB already does, Apple has to host their app 🤣
    mattinozargonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 66 of 76
    MacPro said:

    Would an alternative such as MeWe be usable instead?

    Isn't that where all the Trump supporters fled to when they got tired of being called out for being racists?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 67 of 76
    Why not just inflict pain on those selfish users who choose to tick no?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 68 of 76
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    As an experienced and prolific purveyor of disinformation and smear campaigns, Zuckerberg could easily "bring Apple down a peg or two".

    Today, social media has mainstreamed and legitimized Alternative Facts and Alternative Realities and weaponized those tactics to achieve multiple goals.   We criticize China for restricting social media -- yet it is being used by us (and others) as a weapon against ourselves.  We are holding a gun to our own heads (and loading it for others to hold to our heads).

    Very simply:  Social media has enabled unscrupulous operators to use lies, distortions and exaggerations to shape public opinion.  The American public had become used to honesty in media and has not yet adjusted to media intentionally and purposely lying to them.   And, at this point, lies have become truth and truth has become lies.
    argonaut
  • Reply 69 of 76
    This explains his decision to release a product to “compete” with Apple Watch. Oh, the pain!
    Vengeance is a bad motivator for a new product.
    Building a better product to serve the customers is a great motivator, and is long term wise.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 70 of 76
    Time to inflict pain on Facebook 
    That's not Apple's style. 
    Not overtly, but Apple does do that to us (getting rid of $38 of value in the iPhones), and people that don't coincide with their beliefs (FB, in this example), and use "We're doing this for a higher ethical purpose" to squash any opposition.

    Well played, Apple.  Well played.
  • Reply 71 of 76
    Mark Zuckerberg owns a website that data-mines and sells advertising. There is very little on Facebook that cannot be done elsewhere and Twitter is far superior for for tracking organizations, people and content creators.

    Apple operates the dominant (by profit and mindshare) mobile operating system on the planet, the same is true for iPad OS and watch OS. The Macintosh is continuing to grow even as overall desktop/laptop sales shift to mobile devices. 

    Cannot see anything for Apple to worry about. Facebook is about as despised as Comcast.
    argonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 72 of 76
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,378member
    Here's the killer app that would neutralize Facebook: a simple, user-updated online personal contact app. That is ultimately why a large portion of Facebook's user base can't quite get themselves to delete their accounts. Facebook took off just as landline telephony took a nosedive. Before that, everybody had a telephone plugged into the wall at home, along with a big, thick book that listed the phone number for everyone in town. If you wanted the phone number for someone beyond that, you could call directory assistance and get it. When you moved, your got a new number and a new listing. If you wanted to find and get back in touch with an old friend, it could easily be done.

    Now, even though there's no such thing as long-distance toll calls charged by then minute and everyone has their own mobile phone, those phone numbers aren't publicly listed, and with the thing always right there in your pocket, you really don't want it to be. Email addresses get randomly changed or are abandoned under heaps of spam. So how to assure you can still find old friends? Facebook! You can search almost anyone up, but there's a buffer that allows each person to decide whether to accept a contact. That's what's actually valuable about Facebook: a contact list that stays current, even when your friends move or get a new phone number or whatever. If someone would make a self-sustainable app that does that, but skips the whole social-media-carry-on-all-your-private-conversations-out-in-public thing, swarms of people would dump facebook in a heartbeat and sign up for that. 
    edited February 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 73 of 76
    And honestly, while I use it every day, if Facebook were to fold, I would not shed any tears. It would be tougher to get in touch with a lot of far-flung friends though...
    Why would it be tougher to get in touch with far-flung friends?  They don't have e-mail?  They don't have cellphones (for texting)?  They don't have home phones?  They don't have a mailing address you could use to write to them?  

    All of the above methods of communications still work just fine today - no Facebook needed.

    There are many discussion forums, and you could even open a new, free Discord server for only those you want to communicate with.
    edited February 2021 n2itivguyargonautwatto_cobra
  • Reply 74 of 76
    This explains his decision to release a product to “compete” with Apple Watch. Oh, the pain!
    Vengeance is a bad motivator for a new product.
    Building a better product to serve the customers is a great motivator, and is long term wise.
    Which what Facebook/Zuckerberg could /should do with Facebook, if they feel the Apple's privacy changes are going to significantly hurt their business and bottomline, is to revamp the Facebook product.

    They should change Facebook in a way to try and make up for that lost revenue.

    So either make it advantageous to their members to accept the option that Facebook will track them.  

    Or they offer a subscription option where the price they charge for the product (minus tracking) is actually worth it to their members.  

    At the moment Facebook is free. Does it have enough value to its members they are willing to pay to use it?  

    If they won't then that says something about the product they're offering. 

    They actually need a plan to not only address the Apple situation, but any competitor who comes along and challenges their market area by offering a better/more attractive product. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 75 of 76
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,150member
    This explains his decision to release a product to “compete” with Apple Watch. Oh, the pain!
    Vengeance is a bad motivator for a new product.
    Building a better product to serve the customers is a great motivator, and is long term wise.
    I dunno, sometimes spite works out...

    https://www.cultofmac.com/126116/steve-jobs-created-the-ipad-to-show-one-microsoft-employee-what-a-tablet-really-can-be/
  • Reply 76 of 76
    AppleZulu said:
    Here's the killer app that would neutralize Facebook: a simple, user-updated online personal contact app. That is ultimately why a large portion of Facebook's user base can't quite get themselves to delete their accounts. Facebook took off just as landline telephony took a nosedive. Before that, everybody had a telephone plugged into the wall at home, along with a big, thick book that listed the phone number for everyone in town. If you wanted the phone number for someone beyond that, you could call directory assistance and get it. When you moved, your got a new number and a new listing. If you wanted to find and get back in touch with an old friend, it could easily be done.

    Now, even though there's no such thing as long-distance toll calls charged by then minute and everyone has their own mobile phone, those phone numbers aren't publicly listed, and with the thing always right there in your pocket, you really don't want it to be. Email addresses get randomly changed or are abandoned under heaps of spam. So how to assure you can still find old friends? Facebook! You can search almost anyone up, but there's a buffer that allows each person to decide whether to accept a contact. That's what's actually valuable about Facebook: a contact list that stays current, even when your friends move or get a new phone number or whatever. If someone would make a self-sustainable app that does that, but skips the whole social-media-carry-on-all-your-private-conversations-out-in-public thing, swarms of people would dump facebook in a heartbeat and sign up for that. 
    I don’t know why Apple hasn’t implemented something like this already. I have plenty of friends who have shared their contact info with me by sending it to me from directly within Contacts. I receive it in Messages and add it to Contacts on my phone. It would be great if Apple built in a mechanism so if one of my friends changes their contact info in the Contacts app they could tap a button that would automatically send an alert out to everyone they have shared a contact with that there is new info. Maybe add a toggle in Settings to let those things happen automatically, in the background, no user interaction required.

    I recently had a gift mailed to a friend who had verified their address with me in October. The gift was sent in early January. I sent a text to verify it’s receipt only to find out they had moved a couple of towns over and now the address I had for them (where they had lived for years and years) was now incorrect. If they had the ability to have that address automatically updated for everyone who they had shared their contact with that wouldn’t have been an issue.
    watto_cobra
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