Apple supports World Water Day with renewed commitment to sustainable water use

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple has used World Water Day to announce its continued commitment to existing partnerships working to increase the "efficient and safe" use of water resources.

Dianshan Lake in Shanghai. (Source: Apple)
Dianshan Lake in Shanghai. (Source: Apple)


As iPhone component suppliers work to safeguard against droughts, Apple has marked World Water Day with an announcement about its partnership with the International Alliance for Sustainable Water Management (IASWM). This organization sets standards, and certifies compliance, for companies reliant on water for their manufacturing processes.

Although a worldwide commitment, Apple has concentrated on getting its Chinese supply chain partners certified.

"We firmly believe in the power of lead by example and strive to inspire enterprises in China and beyond to push their supply chains into water resources management," said Ge Yue, vice president of Apple and managing director of Greater China, in a statement (in translation.)

"We would like to congratulate the supply chain enterprises that have recently been certified by the International Alliance for Sustainable Water Management, but we will never stop there," continued Ge Yue. "Together, we will continue to work together to create a new positive impact in the communities we operate to protect more of this valuable shared resource."

World Water Day is a United Nations programme, first held on March 22, 1993. In 2018, Apple partnered with the IASWM, and Chunhua Technology -- an Apple circuit board supplier -- gained its Alliance Gold certification. Many other firms have since followed.

"We are pleased to see more and more Apple supply chain companies participating in our certification programs," said the IASWM's Regional Program Director for Asia Pacific, Sustainable Water Management Alliance, Xu Yu, "which highlights the impact and strength of our partnership with Apple to promote first-class water resources management."

"Real water resources management requires collaboration and leadership," continued Xu Yu. "Apple's constantly improving standards for itself and supply chain businesses set an example for the entire industry."

Apple says its collaboration with the Alliance is part of its Clean Water program. In 2019, this project saved an estimated total of 9.3 billion gallons of freshwater worldwide. According to Apple's World Water Day announcement, that rose to 41.3 billion gallons.



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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    tedz98tedz98 Posts: 75member
    While the focus seems to be on water consumption the other dimension is water disposal after it’s been consumed. When less water is consumed to produce goods, less water is discharged. I don’t know what’s required to achieve water certification but I hope it includes what is done with the waste water.
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Fred257Fred257 Posts: 124member
    In the meantime most manufacturing by Apple done in other countries pollutes water beyond measures.  It’s hypocritical 
  • Reply 4 of 14
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,497member
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
    In the west, a significant amount of water storage is in snowpack. Meltwater from the snowpack generally allows for year round streamflows. Higher temperatures due to climate change is reducing snowpack, and that decreases streamflows. Even if you have more engineered storage, which is becoming more difficult to build, there is a reduction in inflows from streams and rivers to storage areas. This effects not only downstream needs, but all of the local ecosystems in the hydrological basins.

    Case in point, the Colorado River Basin feeds Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California. 

    https://www.americanrivers.org/river/colorado-river/

    The Lower Colorado River, which provides water to Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix, and Tucson, already faces a one million acre-foot deficit and is in danger of running dry far before the Pacific. Climate change is expected to further reduce the river’s flow by 10 to 30 percent by 2050. 

    That's actual scarcity. You provide anecdotes from a region that doe not have historic water scarcity. See the problem with your POV?

    Now an argument could be made that this is all about the follies of creating agriculture in deserts, but at the same time, these regions provide year round produce to rest of the U.S., and also supports thriving economies. 

    For the record, I live in Nevada on the Eastern Sierra, and our current snowpack is at 60% of average, and that is a precursor to a California drought as current storage is depleted and not replaced. That's the definition of scarcity.
    thtfastasleep
  • Reply 5 of 14
    tedz98tedz98 Posts: 75member
    “For the record, I live in Nevada on the Eastern Sierra, and our current snowpack is at 60% of average, and that is a precursor to a California drought as current storage is depleted and not replaced. That's the definition of scarcity.” A resource is only scarce when demand exceeds supply. The population density of the arid west is putting demands on water resources that exceeds the ability of water supplies to meet demand. So before you blame climate change for reduced snow pack you need to evaluate the appropriateness of having 10’s of millions of people living in a water constrained geography.
  • Reply 6 of 14
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,634member
    “Greedy Apple” taking care of our world again!! 
  • Reply 7 of 14
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,497member
    tedz98 said:
    “For the record, I live in Nevada on the Eastern Sierra, and our current snowpack is at 60% of average, and that is a precursor to a California drought as current storage is depleted and not replaced. That's the definition of scarcity.” A resource is only scarce when demand exceeds supply. The population density of the arid west is putting demands on water resources that exceeds the ability of water supplies to meet demand. So before you blame climate change for reduced snow pack you need to evaluate the appropriateness of having 10’s of millions of people living in a water constrained geography.
    Climate change is to blame for the reduced snowpack due both to increasing temperatures, and changing weather patterns; that isn't in dispute scientifically. 

    Scarcity is a factor of the usage vs supply. Population is the primary driver for usage, but so is agriculture. Changes in usage continue to be the primary mitigation for scarcity. Importation of water into California isn't a viable option, desalination isn't practical on a broad scale, and there are very few sites in the Sierra, Cascades, or Rockies, suitable for large scale storage upstream.
  • Reply 8 of 14
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    tmay said:
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
    ...

    That's actual [LOCALIZED] scarcity [BASED ON MAN'S INTERVENTION THAT PROMOTED THE CAUSE -- OVER CONSUMPTION IN THIS CASE]. You provide anecdotes from a region that doe not have historic water scarcity. See the problem with your POV?
    ...
    No, I don't see a problem with my point of view.  In fact, I think you confirmed it.
  • Reply 9 of 14
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    tedz98 said:
    “For the record, I live in Nevada on the Eastern Sierra, and our current snowpack is at 60% of average, and that is a precursor to a California drought as current storage is depleted and not replaced. That's the definition of scarcity.” A resource is only scarce when demand exceeds supply. The population density of the arid west is putting demands on water resources that exceeds the ability of water supplies to meet demand. So before you blame climate change for reduced snow pack you need to evaluate the appropriateness of having 10’s of millions of people living in a water constrained geography.

    Should we not blame both decreased supply and over demand?

    But, we can thank the Corona virus for one thing:   by promoting the telecommuting that will relieve the population density and help to reduce the problem.  Corona virus started that ball rolling after it had been stalled for decades.  But, I don't think it will be stopped now that employers realize that it works and that they can save money and workers realize they can work from the beach in the Caribbean.  The down side will be more Gig workers.
    edited March 22
  • Reply 10 of 14
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,497member
    tmay said:
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
    ...

    That's actual [LOCALIZED] scarcity [BASED ON MAN'S INTERVENTION THAT PROMOTED THE CAUSE -- OVER CONSUMPTION IN THIS CASE]. You provide anecdotes from a region that doe not have historic water scarcity. See the problem with your POV?
    ...
    No, I don't see a problem with my point of view.  In fact, I think you confirmed it.
    The problem in the West is that we do in fact have increasing water scarcity due to climate change, ie, less precipitation as snowfall, and less snowpack, both of which increase scarcity of water resources regardless of consumption.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    thttht Posts: 4,127member
    Like with all other things climate change related and human population related, there isn't one true solution. It's all of the above. Conservation in all its forms. Water reuse systems needs to be built in to all buildings and systems. Desalinization on a mass production scale. Water collection on a mass production scale. Farms need to be as closed cycle water usage as possible.
    muthuk_vanalingamtmay
  • Reply 12 of 14
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,836member
    Fred257 said:
    In the meantime most manufacturing by Apple done in other countries pollutes water beyond measures.  It’s hypocritical 
    Gee, if only there was an organization that “sets standards, and certifies compliance, for companies reliant on water for their manufacturing processes” that Apple could partner with to mitigate that problem. Did you bother even trying to read the article?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 13 of 14
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,266member
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
    Tell a thirsty person in the Atacama Desert that water isn't scarce. It doesn't much matter to him that it's raining again in Mawsynram, India. Sure, you can bottle the rain from India and deliver it to the guy in the high desert in Chile, but the the Three Gorges Dam or the Pittsburgh area canals are all puny water management systems compared to the planetary climate. Overuse of poorly planned water resources downstream of snowpack that's dwindling because of climate change is the definition of scarce water in a truth-based reality. No matter the how much the downstream water management improves, if the climactic systems continue to shift to the extent the snow pack dries up, the scarcity will remain downstream. It could be the precipitation that snowpack depends on will drop on land somewhere else, creating excess that can somehow be redirected back to where the water is scarce. On the other hand, most of that precipitation first has to be extracted from the Pacific Ocean. If the changing climate is simply failing to lift the water out of the ocean in the first place (or rains it all back out before reaching land), then humans on the West Coast are in for an even bigger problem, because water that hasn't flowed uphill in the first place is just plain scarce.
    edited March 22 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 14
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,682member
    tmay said:
    tmay said:
    "Water management" needs to get its feet planted in reality.
    Generally speaking they present water as a scarce resource that must be preserved.

    But the truth is that water is scarce in some areas, over abundant in others and just fine in other areas.   You cannot generalize.

    On the other hand, human intervention has probably done more to create water crisis than anything:   Projects on the Colorado river, the Ganges & Yellow rivers as well as on the Nile have created crisis in other, downstream areas.

    Conversely, water management projects in the Pittsburgh area 100 years ago powered the industrial might of the U.S. -- as prior to a system of locks, dams and reservoirs, the rivers that fed Pittsburgh's mill could not be relied on to provide the year round transportation the mills required.  Basically, they flooded in the spring and dried up in the summer.   The system did not deprive any other area of their needs but did provide Pittsburgh with its needs:  The Best of Both Worlds!

    Water itself isn't scarce.  But we do need better management of it -- and that starts with truth based reality.
    ...

    That's actual [LOCALIZED] scarcity [BASED ON MAN'S INTERVENTION THAT PROMOTED THE CAUSE -- OVER CONSUMPTION IN THIS CASE]. You provide anecdotes from a region that doe not have historic water scarcity. See the problem with your POV?
    ...
    No, I don't see a problem with my point of view.  In fact, I think you confirmed it.
    The problem in the West is that we do in fact have increasing water scarcity due to climate change, ie, less precipitation as snowfall, and less snowpack, both of which increase scarcity of water resources regardless of consumption.
    If you are speaking of the effects of climate change 'west of the Rockies', I agree.
    For the rest (except the midwest sucking on Oghallala  Aquifer dry), climate change seems to be making water erratic -- shifting from scarcity to deluge and back again. 

    Pittsburgh was a really interesting case last summer:  we got almost no rain and we lost lots of greenary.  Yet, we had no "water shortage" because it rained all around us and the rivers remained at full depth.  I have no idea what caused it but it was like there was an umbrella over the city.  In 70 years I've never seen that.

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