Parallels Desktop 16.5 released with native Apple Silicon support

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 53
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,213member
    What do you do now?
    You regrettably end up leaving Apple and getting a PC. Apple unfortunately, as they are in a habit of doing now, allows no other choice than The Apple Way. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 42 of 53
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,213member
    mcdave said:
    hodar said:
    For work, Excel on Windows has the capability to allow me to write scripts in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA); for reasons I don not understand, these advanced libraries are simply not available for the Mac community.  So, while my Excel workbooks have ~60,000 lines of VBA to allow it to link into the corporate database and dateline quality assessment info, I cannot do the same thing with my MSFT Office license for Mac.  So, I have 2 different licenses.

    Now, I have no choice but have multiple computers at home.  Because programs that USED TO work flawlessly, no longer function at all.
    Doesn’t ARM Windows support MS Office+VBA? If not, & MS are ditching VBA, it looks like your 60,000 line code investment is at risk. Sounds like a huge hack anyway, why not write M1 native software to integrate directly with the other systems?
    Because M1 native software will run on about 7.5% of the world's computers, vs VBA which will run on 99% of the world's computers. However, yes VBA should be binned.
  • Reply 43 of 53
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,213member
    drewsaur said:
    NYC362 said:
    So let's say I have an M1 Mac with Parallels 16.5 and Windows 10 ARM.  Will Windows programs that use the regular Windows 10 for Intel (like Quicken for Windows) work...or do those programs need to be written for Windows for ARM. 
    The preview version of Windows on ARM emulates Intel binaries just like Rosetta does.
    Not quite "just like Rosetta does". It's crap: It's slow, crash prone and immature, and doesn't support a lot of DLLs. Barely anything runs in it.
  • Reply 44 of 53
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,213member

    And last, but not least, under no circumstances should you be mixing access to corporate data with your personal profile/software/anything. If you're putting anything personal on a company machine ... I'd fire your ass. By mixing these areas, you increase the likelihood of a breach exponentially. And legally, your company can confiscate your machine, whether you bought it or not. You have their property on it. Think of this like money. You never, ever mix personal and business funds, because it puts you in massive legal and financial jeopardy (look up 'piercing the corporate veil'). This doesn't even delve into the privacy concerns of mixing your private computing needs with your job's.

    Which begs another question: how is it that you have access to such sensitive corporate data, but they don't issue you a work machine or compensate you for Parallels as a business expense? There's way too much that's shady and questionable about some of what you're describing.

    I'd say this is just more FUD. 
    The USA is not the world. Whether you agree with it or not, most people have "personal data" on work machines outside the US at least, even as much as signing in with an AppleID. Having property on something doesnt mean the thing it's on can be confiscated. A thief holding a Macbook in their house doesn't allow law enforcement to take their house.
  • Reply 45 of 53
    JosephAU said:
    So if I want to use any of these OSs? Parallels seems to have lost what it made it great and lost me as a customer. I have lots of old files that only run on old software. Looks like I have to keep an old intel mac too. Very disappointed.

    Supported Guest Operating Systems (Mac with Intel processors):

    • Windows 10 (recommended)
    • Windows 8.1
    • Windows 8
    • Windows Server 2019
    • Windows Server 2016
    • Windows Server 2012 R2
    • Windows 7 (SP0-SP1)
    • Windows Server 2008 R2 (SP0-SP2)
    • Windows Vista Home, Business, Ultimate and Enterprise (SP0-SP2)
    • Windows Server 2003 R2 (SP0-SP2)
    • Windows XP (SP0-SP3)
    • Windows 2000 Professional SP4
    • Windows 2000 Server SP4
    • Boot2Docker
    • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8,7 and 6
    • CentOS Linux 8, 7, 6
    • Fedora Linux 33, 32, 31
    • Ubuntu 20.10, 20.04, 19.04, 18.04 LTS, 16.04 LTS
    • Debian GNU/Linux 10, 9
    • Suse Linux Enterprise 15
    • OpenSUSE Linux 15.2, 15.1, 15
    • Linux Mint 20, 19, 18
    • Kali 2020.2, 2019, 2018
    • Elementary OS 5
    • Manjaro 18
    • Mageia 7
    • Gentoo Linux **
    • Solaris 11, 10 **
    • openBSD 6 **
    • FreeBSD 12, 11 **
    • openVZ 7
    • eComStation 2, 1.2 **
    • ReactOS 0.4 **
    • Android OS *
    • macOS Big Sur 11.0 
    • macOS Catalina 10.15
    • macOS Mojave 10.14.x
    • macOS High Sierra 10.13.x
    • macOS Sierra 10.12.x
    • OS X El Capitan 10.11.x
    • OS X Yosemite 10.10.x
    • OS X Mavericks 10.9.x
    • OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.x
    • OS X Lion 10.7.x
    • OS X Lion Server 10.7.x
    • Mac OS X Snow Leopard Server 10.6.x
    • Mac OS X Leopard Server 10.5.x
    • and many more...
    Still using solid rubber tires or wagon wheels on your car, too? But seriously, I have 'old files' going back to the '80s, possibly the '70s. Nothing keeps me from using them or updating them.

    Instead of posting a dubious laundry list of OSes (many of which are no longer supported by their vendors, so I fail to see how this is Parallels problem), maybe you should post the ones that are critical to you and see if anyone will help you? Otherwise, this is whole post is basically FUD. Any time something is still useful, folks find a way to update or emulate so that it still runs, regardless of architecture changes. If that weren't the case, hardware would never change (or it would be saddled with business destroying legacy cruft ... cough ... cough ...).
    You fail to see the point but thats ok when you have a small mind. Point been the best part of Parallels has been lost but feel free to belittle someone for bring up a very valid point.
    elijahgwatto_cobra
  • Reply 46 of 53
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 125member
    Conceptually, there is no reason why we can't run Windows 10 on Apple Silicon based Macs.

    In the old days of PowerPC based macs, we had SoftPC and SoftWindows.  These software packages allowed one to run the Intel version of Windows, and Intel Windows software, on a non-intel Mac.   These product emulated the Intel architecture.

    I think there is a market for virtualization software that runs on an Apple Silicon Mac, and emulates an Intel processor.


    watto_cobraJosephAU
  • Reply 47 of 53
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 109member
    hodar said:
    So, basically Parallels remains a waste of money for anyone who bought an M1 Mac.

    Rehash MY user case; which is probably a significant number of user cases.  Why did I buy Parallels?  Why pay $$ for this program?

    ...

    Now, I have no choice but have multiple computers at home.  Because programs that USED TO work flawlessly, no longer function at all.
    Not so. While I agree that Parallels isn't going to work for you, a feasible alternative is a cloud-based PC. If Parallels provided satisfactory performance for gaming, these should also fit the bill. Better still, you can size them up/down so that you don't pay for capabilities you don't need (i.e. basic for desktop work, crank for gaming).
    JosephAU
  • Reply 48 of 53
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 109member
    elijahg said:
    What do you do now?
    You regrettably end up leaving Apple and getting a PC. Apple unfortunately, as they are in a habit of doing now, allows no other choice than The Apple Way. 
    ... or you take a deep breath, if you're close to needing to update, plan for an update using the last gen Intel, relax for another 3-6 years, and then update to either the emulator-compatible version of Parallels (or Windows ARM VM), or use the latest high-performance cloud PCs that are always improving.

  • Reply 49 of 53
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 613member
    mfryd said:
    Conceptually, there is no reason why we can't run Windows 10 on Apple Silicon based Macs.

    In the old days of PowerPC based macs, we had SoftPC and SoftWindows.  These software packages allowed one to run the Intel version of Windows, and Intel Windows software, on a non-intel Mac.   These product emulated the Intel architecture.

    I think there is a market for virtualization software that runs on an Apple Silicon Mac, and emulates an Intel processor.


    The only Apple Silicon native x86/x86-64 emulator that I'm aware of is QEmu. I've run Ubuntu 20.04 on a generic x86-64 VM on my M1 MacBook Air and it is very slow. In my assessment, useably slow. It takes many minutes to start up and clicking anything takes several seconds for a response. Even just moving a window has a lag of 2 or 3 seconds before you see the window drag start.

    That isn't to say that someone couldn't improve the QEmu x86 emulator or write a better one but that is probably man-years worth of work that probably hasn't started. One thing that I noticed is that even though I allocated 2 or 4 cores to the emulator, it pretty much only uses one. That might be a low-hanging fruit for someone to approach improving the performance.

    Right now, the only emulator is not going to be fit for the purpose of running x86-64/AMD64 software on Windows for normal use. Ubuntu is almost certainly more efficient in resources than Windows 10 is and it is really not usable.
    elijahgmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 50 of 53
    dr. xdr. x Posts: 277member
    rob53 said:
    dr. x said:
    I wonder what VMWare is up to and if they will provide support for M1?
    Just announced: Dell is spinning out VMware. Might not mean anything but VMware seems to be bouncing all over the place so not sure what's going to happen. VMware is hosted on other operating systems, it's not really a big seller on macOS. The majority of VMware products don't even work on macOS so I'm sure it will be a long wait although it might be shorter if ARM destroys Intel thereby destroying X86. If Microsoft wants its software only to run on X86 platforms then it will continue to lose customers.

    Looks like we have an update. This is excellent news!
  • Reply 51 of 53
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,234member
    mfryd said:
    Conceptually, there is no reason why we can't run Windows 10 on Apple Silicon based Macs.

    In the old days of PowerPC based macs, we had SoftPC and SoftWindows.  These software packages allowed one to run the Intel version of Windows, and Intel Windows software, on a non-intel Mac.   These product emulated the Intel architecture.

    I think there is a market for virtualization software that runs on an Apple Silicon Mac, and emulates an Intel processor.
    VirtualPC was always terribly slow. You could barely do anything on it. 
    elijahg
  • Reply 52 of 53
    NYC362 said:
    So let's say I have an M1 Mac with Parallels 16.5 and Windows 10 ARM.  Will Windows programs that use the regular Windows 10 for Intel (like Quicken for Windows) work...or do those programs need to be written for Windows for ARM. 
    No, you will need to install ARM-version of the software. UWP apps should work as they are usually compiled for Intel and ARM. 
  • Reply 53 of 53
    elehcdnelehcdn Posts: 385member
    The whole people will only buy Windows PCs to run Microsoft Office is a changing landscape considering MS is moving away from physical media and towards an online platform (ie, try to find a physical copy of Office 2019 in either Window or Mac that you can run load and run on your local computer.)

    At what point does MS Office simply become a terminal for applications on the web? And if that is the case, why wouldn’t people just buy the fastest computer that runs web apps?

    I purchased an M1 Mac Mini and the performance difference running Chrome is night and day. I can have multiple Chrome windows open along with all my other apps without any slowdowns or spinning cursors so if Chrome is a common denominator (and even with its horrible performance it is for many corporate and educational institutions) it will almost certainly run much better in ARM.  I am not sure how the performance would be if running through a gateway such as Citrix, but I am going to assume that networked applications in ARM are going to fly as well. 

    Considering the last year, WFH means no longer being stuck on a Windows PC running MS Office on your local computer. Microsoft has already figured that out.
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