Apple debuts colorful 24-inch iMac with M1, upgraded camera and audio

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Comments

  • Reply 221 of 283
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,772member
    mike54 said:
    I wonder if there would be any chance of Apple replacing the internal logic for an updated one in the future? It looks like it can be easily swapped out. Just take it into an Apple Store and have them replace it. It would be the way to go instead of ditching the whole iMac or before prematurely becoming electronic rubbish. If Apple sincerely cares about the environment this is what they would do.
    That's an interesting option.  It will be interesting to see how easy these machines are to disassemble on iFixit.

    For most folks, by the time someone would even entertain the thought of swapping out the motherboard... years later, most will go for a new iMac because of other items like a newer, more advanced display.  I do like that idea though.

    To me it makes sense for Apple to design one standardized motherboard layout that would fit inside any iMac and just put in whatever ASi chip/ram/SSD on it with all the screw-holes, connector locations standardized to fit in any new iMac chassis.  The Apple I know will probably make the boards just different enough to make it really difficult to pull that off just because Apple would rather have people buy new iMacs than just swapping out the motherboard "card".
  • Reply 222 of 283
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    To me, dropping legacy ports seems totally inline with what has happened in the past, Firewire 400, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt 1+2, USB 1+2, dial-up modems, IR sensors, VGA/Various display ports were all in the iMac at one point but were dropped  (IR got dropped twice!) as the product moved forward. This one has USB 4 and Thunderbolt 3 so while they reduced the number of ports they at least progressed the technology. 

    As far as the entry level one simply being differentiated by processor, graphics and ram and storage, that isn't correct. When Apple introduced the iMac DV it had a DVD ROM, Firewire and a VGA port that the entry level iMac introduced at the same time didn't have. Similarly when the CD-RW and Superdrive were announced, those features weren't options for the entry level. There may be other examples but I'm not going to look through the entire history of iMacs. 

    In the end it is all kind of subjective, when the iMac first came out there were wildly different thoughts on it only having USB and ditching the floppy. Over the two decades of it's of its existence there has always been pretty strong and disagreeing opinions when Apple has updated the product. So there is no reason to think this round would be any different. When it comes to thinking this is a step backward, that's totally your prerogative and while I disagree I see where you are coming form and respect that opinion. Hat to Apple for keeping it consistently controversial. 


    edited April 21
  • Reply 223 of 283
    ITGUYINSDITGUYINSD Posts: 301member
    mario said:
    Headphone jack is located on the side on the desktop computer???? Who wants speaker cable dangling from the side all the time going to external powered speakers, instead of neatly tucked behind the screen and out of sight?
    Get yourself a USB DAC and problem solved.  They can be had for a 10 buck and up on Amazon.  Depending on the quality of your speakers and the DAC you get, you can wind up with better audio than what the iMac puts out.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 224 of 283
    ITGUYINSDITGUYINSD Posts: 301member
    Scot1 said:
    Was hoping for 27” or 30” iMac 
    Looks like memory swap out might have been lost as well in new design?
    Isn't the memory in the M1 actually part of M1 package?  If so, then you'll never have "swap out" memory in the M-series.
  • Reply 225 of 283
    I love everything about it except....once again, Apple is being so stingy with the storage.  256GB for a desktop computer is almost insulting.  For $1300, 512GB should have been the minimum and I wish I didn't keep having this complaint every time there's a big refresh in the Mac product line.  A disappointing skimp on what looks like a really nice update.

    I too wish the chin was totally gone, but I suppose we just aren't there yet.
    I've been holding off for years waiting for Apple to release an updated iMac with reasonable SSD storage capacities.  I guess I have to keep waiting.  My $500 Xbox series X came with a 1TB SSD.  Come on apple.
  • Reply 226 of 283
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,443member
    crowley said:
    spice-boy said:
    Jon Ive is rolling in his grave. 
    What's he doing in a grave?
    I know he's living, just using a cliche to make a joke
  • Reply 227 of 283
    Dibiase said:
    I love everything about it except....once again, Apple is being so stingy with the storage.  256GB for a desktop computer is almost insulting.  For $1300, 512GB should have been the minimum and I wish I didn't keep having this complaint every time there's a big refresh in the Mac product line.  A disappointing skimp on what looks like a really nice update.

    I too wish the chin was totally gone, but I suppose we just aren't there yet.
    I've been holding off for years waiting for Apple to release an updated iMac with reasonable SSD storage capacities.  I guess I have to keep waiting.  My $500 Xbox series X came with a 1TB SSD.  Come on apple.
    Gaming consoles are a bad comparison for a few reasons but the the biggest one is that they are sold at a loss and not a particularly small one. The Xbox X is reported to leave Microsoft at over 300 bucks in the hole. So that puts it 800 minimum to breakeven, now add a 4k display and a profit. 
    edited April 21
  • Reply 228 of 283
    I’d just like to point out one thing no one seems to have mentioned yet.

    Does this new iMac have a battery? Because... MagSafe. Tripping over the cord and having it disconnect has consequences if there’s no battery.
    BeatsDetnatorTRAG
  • Reply 229 of 283
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,888member
    I’d just like to point out one thing no one seems to have mentioned yet.

    Does this new iMac have a battery? Because... MagSafe. Tripping over the cord and having it disconnect has consequences if there’s no battery.
    So tuck the cord away?  It's a desktop computer, you shouldn't have the power cord out somewhere it can be tripped over, MagSafe or not.  Tripping over a non-MagSafe cord probably has consequences too, if it sends your iMac crashing to the floor.
    tenthousandthingsFidonet127watto_cobra
  • Reply 230 of 283
    swpalmer said:
    MacPro said:
    jcc said:
    sflocal said:
    I fail to understand the hate people have towards the iMac's "chin".  It really comes across as petty and that chin I think is what differentiates the iMac instead of making it look like some large, generic monitor.  Get over it people. 

    I actually glad there's some kind of chin there, especially with the new color options, it allows some of that color to come to the front of the unit as well.  Good job Apple.

    I do with the specs for the iMac were more beefy.  I used an M1-based MacBook and while I was absolutely floored by the performance, I expected Apple would give the desktop Macs with ASi chips made for desktop-class machines.  I just hope that whatever Apple has in store for the larger 27"+ iMac, it better include more RAM, and much higher spec ASi chips.
    A chin serves no purpose. It should be removed.
    It's where the computer actually resides.  
    It's where you can grab it to adjust the position without getting fingerprints on the screen.
    The chin is a mild disappointment to me but not a deal breaker.  But you could have a small bottom bezel to adjust the position and keep fingerprints off the screen.  
  • Reply 231 of 283
    crowley said:
    I’d just like to point out one thing no one seems to have mentioned yet.

    Does this new iMac have a battery? Because... MagSafe. Tripping over the cord and having it disconnect has consequences if there’s no battery.
    So tuck the cord away?  It's a desktop computer, you shouldn't have the power cord out somewhere it can be tripped over, MagSafe or not.  Tripping over a non-MagSafe cord probably has consequences too, if it sends your iMac crashing to the floor.
    Then what’s the advantage of using a magnetic connection? Apple is marketing this iMac as something you can show off, out in the open. Also light and something you can easily move to a new location if you wanted. I get that it would be worse if the computer came crashing down but what you if it dislodged while you’re shifting something around? This seems like an oversight to me.
  • Reply 232 of 283
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    To me, dropping legacy ports seems totally inline with what has happened in the past, Firewire 400, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt 1+2, USB 1+2, dial-up modems, IR sensors, VGA/Various display ports were all in the iMac at one point but were dropped  (IR got dropped twice!) as the product moved forward. This one has USB 4 and Thunderbolt 3 so while they reduced the number of ports they at least progressed the technology. 

    As far as the entry level one simply being differentiated by processor, graphics and ram and storage, that isn't correct. When Apple introduced the iMac DV it had a DVD ROM, Firewire and a VGA port that the entry level iMac introduced at the same time didn't have. Similarly when the CD-RW and Superdrive were announced, those features weren't options for the entry level. There may be other examples but I'm not going to look through the entire history of iMacs. 

    In the end it is all kind of subjective, when the iMac first came out there were wildly different thoughts on it only having USB and ditching the floppy. Over the two decades of it's of its existence there has always been pretty strong and disagreeing opinions when Apple has updated the product. So there is no reason to think this round would be any different. When it comes to thinking this is a step backward, that's totally your prerogative and while I disagree I see where you are coming form and respect that opinion. Hat to Apple for keeping it consistently controversial. 


    But in this case, they didn't drop legacy ports.  They just gave you fewer ports, period.  The mid and upper level versions give you four, the $1299 gives you two.  That's not something they'd done in the past.


    elijahg
  • Reply 233 of 283
    I love everything about it except....once again, Apple is being so stingy with the storage.  256GB for a desktop computer is almost insulting.  For $1300, 512GB should have been the minimum and I wish I didn't keep having this complaint every time there's a big refresh in the Mac product line.  A disappointing skimp on what looks like a really nice update.

    I too wish the chin was totally gone, but I suppose we just aren't there yet.
    Apple constantly makes the cheapest model so useless as to be embarrassing. Trying to recommend an iMac to elderly friends as their first Apple computer is difficult when you have to start by saying "Don't get the lowest model" and then help them to upgrade memory and RAM to reasonable specs. This has happened too often over the last 15-20 years. Also the spinning beach ball used to be normal on brand new lower spec machines! Apple we love you and all that, but please enough of the upsell and skimping. 
    elijahg
  • Reply 234 of 283
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    To me, dropping legacy ports seems totally inline with what has happened in the past, Firewire 400, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt 1+2, USB 1+2, dial-up modems, IR sensors, VGA/Various display ports were all in the iMac at one point but were dropped  (IR got dropped twice!) as the product moved forward. This one has USB 4 and Thunderbolt 3 so while they reduced the number of ports they at least progressed the technology. 

    As far as the entry level one simply being differentiated by processor, graphics and ram and storage, that isn't correct. When Apple introduced the iMac DV it had a DVD ROM, Firewire and a VGA port that the entry level iMac introduced at the same time didn't have. Similarly when the CD-RW and Superdrive were announced, those features weren't options for the entry level. There may be other examples but I'm not going to look through the entire history of iMacs. 

    In the end it is all kind of subjective, when the iMac first came out there were wildly different thoughts on it only having USB and ditching the floppy. Over the two decades of it's of its existence there has always been pretty strong and disagreeing opinions when Apple has updated the product. So there is no reason to think this round would be any different. When it comes to thinking this is a step backward, that's totally your prerogative and while I disagree I see where you are coming form and respect that opinion. Hat to Apple for keeping it consistently controversial. 


    But in this case, they didn't drop legacy ports.  They just gave you fewer ports, period.  The mid and upper level versions give you four, the $1299 gives you two.  That's not something they'd done in the past.


    They dropped the USB Type A ports from the previous models = Dropped legacy ports. The new models have USB 4 which wasn't present on the previous models. So all the new models support USB 4 while the older models didn't.

    When the slot loaded iMacs were first announced the intro level had two USB ports, the mid tier was the iMac DV and had two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports and a VGA port, the iMac DV SE two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports, a VGA port and a DVD ROM. So they have had two ports on the low end and five on the mid and high end before. 

    This time is slightly different, while the low end machine has fewer ports it at least has the faster ports unlike the slot loaded iMac which had the slower of the four ports. 
    edited April 21
  • Reply 235 of 283
    I have just finished reading this entire thread and I think a good deal of the self-described “pros” on here have once again missed the forest for the trees. You might not agree with the design language, but this isn’t designed for you nor are they with your specific use cases in mind; I can see this dash of colour being very popular, and whilst you mightn’t like the pastel palette or the bezel or the chin or the foot or the PSU or anything much at all about it, many consumers will do.

    Amidst the sea of boredom in the average retail showroom that isn’t an Apple Store, these will be absolutely eye-catching, and are powerful enough and competitively priced enough to make for an extremely tempting proposition. Personally, I’m trying to decide whether the blue, the purple, or the green shall fit best with the décor in my home office. I’m a freelance teacher and writer, so like the other 90 per cent of the market, these iMacs are more than powerful enough for my computing needs.

    So what if it’s got a Jay Leno chin? What I see is a useful area for all the mountain of post-it notes I know I’ll write to go, and the lack of a logo on the front simply gives me more real estate for that purpose. Likewise, it’ll help me keep the display fingerprint free, which is what bothers me, if or when I need to adjust the viewing angle — and the white bezel might just prove to be better to work with all-day long than a black one (or none at all), especially as a way to reduce eye strain, so until you’ve had to use it what’s the point in complaining?

    I know you pros like to be all superior in how “pro” you are, but just be patient because something is likely to be in the pipeline that’s better suited to the professional market, anyway. And, besides, I can’t actually think of too many occasions in the post-Scully era where Apple didn’t use colour (or else some other element from its design language) to differentiate between its consumer and professional offerings — the blueberry G3 PowerMac being the only exception to the rule that immediately springs to mind.

    Anyway, due to Covid, 2019-2021 has been a wee horrid mess (with perhaps even longer to go yet). A little colour to bring some of the joy back into life might be just the ticket — or have you all become too jaded and cynical to be able to appreciate it?
    roundaboutnowtenthousandthingsFidonet127watto_cobra
  • Reply 236 of 283
    ZeeblerZeebler Posts: 19member
    My 8 year old son asked if there were any boy computers...
    Even he has enough color theory sense to see this pastel / grey flop for what it is.

    These give the rainbow toilet seat laptops a run for the title of 'Ugliest Apple Product Ever'.
    elijahg
  • Reply 237 of 283
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    To me, dropping legacy ports seems totally inline with what has happened in the past, Firewire 400, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt 1+2, USB 1+2, dial-up modems, IR sensors, VGA/Various display ports were all in the iMac at one point but were dropped  (IR got dropped twice!) as the product moved forward. This one has USB 4 and Thunderbolt 3 so while they reduced the number of ports they at least progressed the technology. 

    As far as the entry level one simply being differentiated by processor, graphics and ram and storage, that isn't correct. When Apple introduced the iMac DV it had a DVD ROM, Firewire and a VGA port that the entry level iMac introduced at the same time didn't have. Similarly when the CD-RW and Superdrive were announced, those features weren't options for the entry level. There may be other examples but I'm not going to look through the entire history of iMacs. 

    In the end it is all kind of subjective, when the iMac first came out there were wildly different thoughts on it only having USB and ditching the floppy. Over the two decades of it's of its existence there has always been pretty strong and disagreeing opinions when Apple has updated the product. So there is no reason to think this round would be any different. When it comes to thinking this is a step backward, that's totally your prerogative and while I disagree I see where you are coming form and respect that opinion. Hat to Apple for keeping it consistently controversial. 


    But in this case, they didn't drop legacy ports.  They just gave you fewer ports, period.  The mid and upper level versions give you four, the $1299 gives you two.  That's not something they'd done in the past.


    They dropped the USB Type A ports from the previous models = Dropped legacy ports. The new models have USB 4 which wasn't present on the previous models. So all the new models support USB 4 while the older models didn't.

    When the slot loaded iMacs were first announced the intro level had two USB ports, the mid tier was the iMac DV and had two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports and a VGA port, the iMac DV SE two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports, a VGA port and a DVD ROM. So they have had two ports on the low end and five on the mid and high end before. 

    This time is slightly different, while the low end machine has fewer ports it at least has the faster ports unlike the slot loaded iMac which had the slower of the four ports. 
    And don't forget that those "fewer ports" are also way more versatile than in times past--yes, a dongle or hub/dock may be required, but at least you have the option to make those ports be just about anything you want, including any number of legacy connections like VGA, Firewire or even RS-232 if you're so inclined. In the past, if the base model (or any model for that matter) did not have whatever port you wanted, you were totally out of luck.
    watto_cobraDetnator
  • Reply 238 of 283
    JinTech said:
    And it seems only 8GB memory across the board with no upgrade to 16GB. WTF Apple?
    There is a configuration for 16gb of memory. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 239 of 283
    Zeebler said:
    My 8 year old son asked if there were any boy computers...
    Even he has enough color theory sense to see this pastel / grey flop for what it is.

    These give the rainbow toilet seat laptops a run for the title of 'Ugliest Apple Product Ever'.
    I knew a troll would eventual take the color pallet and make a sexist or homophobic comment but I didn't know which one they would go with. Apparently it was sexism. Trolls have just become so lazy and predictable. 
    edited April 21
  • Reply 240 of 283
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    To me, dropping legacy ports seems totally inline with what has happened in the past, Firewire 400, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt 1+2, USB 1+2, dial-up modems, IR sensors, VGA/Various display ports were all in the iMac at one point but were dropped  (IR got dropped twice!) as the product moved forward. This one has USB 4 and Thunderbolt 3 so while they reduced the number of ports they at least progressed the technology. 

    As far as the entry level one simply being differentiated by processor, graphics and ram and storage, that isn't correct. When Apple introduced the iMac DV it had a DVD ROM, Firewire and a VGA port that the entry level iMac introduced at the same time didn't have. Similarly when the CD-RW and Superdrive were announced, those features weren't options for the entry level. There may be other examples but I'm not going to look through the entire history of iMacs. 

    In the end it is all kind of subjective, when the iMac first came out there were wildly different thoughts on it only having USB and ditching the floppy. Over the two decades of it's of its existence there has always been pretty strong and disagreeing opinions when Apple has updated the product. So there is no reason to think this round would be any different. When it comes to thinking this is a step backward, that's totally your prerogative and while I disagree I see where you are coming form and respect that opinion. Hat to Apple for keeping it consistently controversial. 


    But in this case, they didn't drop legacy ports.  They just gave you fewer ports, period.  The mid and upper level versions give you four, the $1299 gives you two.  That's not something they'd done in the past.


    They dropped the USB Type A ports from the previous models = Dropped legacy ports. The new models have USB 4 which wasn't present on the previous models. So all the new models support USB 4 while the older models didn't.

    When the slot loaded iMacs were first announced the intro level had two USB ports, the mid tier was the iMac DV and had two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports and a VGA port, the iMac DV SE two USB ports, two Firewire 400 ports, a VGA port and a DVD ROM. So they have had two ports on the low end and five on the mid and high end before. 

    This time is slightly different, while the low end machine has fewer ports it at least has the faster ports unlike the slot loaded iMac which had the slower of the four ports. 
    But when the dropped a legacy port, they replaced it with whatever the more current version was.  You ended up with the same number of ports in the end.  Or really close to it. With this one you're going from six overall ports (seven if you count the SD card reader) to two.

    From the last G3 iMac to the last 21.5" iMac "thin" aluminum, you had at least 4 ports even on the lowest model:

    Last G3:  2 USB-1, 2 Firewire 400 (4 total)
    First G4:  3 USB-1, 2 FW 400 (5 total)
    First G5:  3 USB-1, 2 FW 400 (5 total)
    First Core Duo:  3 USB, 2 FW 400 (5 total)
    First 20" Alum.:  3 USB, 1 FW 400, 1 FW 800 (5 total)
    First 21.5" Alum.: 4 USB 2.0, 1 FW 800 (5 total)
    First "thin" 21.5" Alum.:  4 USB 3.0 (4 total)

    And all of the above had ethernet for no extra cost.  And somewhere around the Core Duo stage also had an SD slot

    But now for the lowest model you get no ethernet unless you pay extra, no SD slot, and just 2 Thunderbolt/USB 4 ports.

    That's what I'm getting at.  This is a big difference from past patterns.

    elijahg
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