Cellebrite removes iPhone data extraction from most capable product

Posted:
in iPhone
Because of a crippling vulnerability, Cellebrite disabled the iPhone data extraction feature on its Physical Analyzer tool.

Cellebrite Physical Analyzer no longer works with iPhone
Cellebrite Physical Analyzer no longer works with iPhone


Cellebrite is a company that builds forensic devices used by law enforcement and governments. These devices have been deployed around the world to gain access to data stored on iPhones and other smartphones.

After a slew of vulnerabilities was discovered by the CEO of Signal, Cellebrite was forced to remove iPhone data retrieval from its most powerful device. The Physical Analyzer has been called "the industry standard for digital data examination," though now it can no longer access the highly-protected iPhone.

According to 9to5Mac, Cellebrite closed multiple security holes reported by the Signal CEO. However, there is an unpatched vulnerability that iPhone apps could exploit to corrupt the Physical Analyzer.

Cellebrite released the following message with the updates:

This message is to inform you that we have new product updates available for the following solutions:

  • Cellebrite UFED v7.44.0.205
  • Cellebrite Physical Analyzer v7.44.2
  • Cellebrite UFED Cloud v7.44.2

Cellebrite UFED 7.44.0.205 and Cellebrite Physical Analyzer 7.44.2 have been released to address a recently identified security vulnerability. This security patch strengthens the protection of the solutions.

As part of the update, the Advanced Logical iOS extraction flow is now available in Cellebrite UFED only.

Since the data obtained from an iPhone could be easily corrupted, Cellebrite had no choice but to remove the functionality until the vulnerability is patched. The change could be damaging to the company since its ability to access iPhone was a significant selling point.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,310member
    FTGs (fork these guys).

    I wonder if Apple is going to turn the screws on them using its installer files within their software (as reported by Signal CEO), surely a violation of their terms.
    rare commentMplsPBeatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 13
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,068member
    Rarely do I laugh out loud at a tech news story. 

    Heheh. Oh dear. Hehehehe
    rare commenth4y3sBeatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 13
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,560member
    Cellebrite is a company that builds forensic devices used by law enforcement, governments, and others that can get their hands on one by legal and illegal means.
    Fixed that for you. Don’t for a second think that only the “good guys” have these things. 
    Xedpscooter63WgkruegerBeatscornchipuraharabeowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 13
    DAalseth said:
    Cellebrite is a company that builds forensic devices used by law enforcement, governments, and others that can get their hands on one by legal and illegal means.
    Fixed that for you. Don’t for a second think that only the “good guys” have these things. 
    Especially as one fell out of a truck in front of Signal!  Not saying whether Signal are bad or good guys, just noting that if someone with no special governmental access was able to get one, there are plenty out in the wild.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 13
    Just an SLIGHT embarrassment for Cellbrite and ALL of their clients/customers.

    ...and every lawyer of everyone ever interrogated/arrested/indicted/convicted on basis of potentially Cellbritally tainted evidence should rush to the relevant courts on behalf of their clients. Won't be easy in certain regimes though...

     
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 13
    iadlibiadlib Posts: 60member
    Good riddance. I hope Apple incorporates Signal’s idea to have random bits of data as part of the app to make their tools even less reliable. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 13
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,614member
    I think Cellebrite new if it sold this to the public, someone would sooner than later determine that Cellebrite was using software that violated Apple's IP and Apple would aim it's heavily-funded cannons at Cellebrite.

    Well... Cellebrite is now waiting to hear the drums of Moria.  Fly you fools!
    Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 13
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,342member
    If a product has to be kept undercover from prying eyes, it probably hasn't been examined thoroughly.

    This is why Linux is so robust, and Cellebrite Physical Analyzer isn't.
    DAalsethwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 13
    mknelsonmknelson Posts: 743member
    Hubro said:
    Just an SLIGHT embarrassment for Cellbrite and ALL of their clients/customers.

    ...and every lawyer of everyone ever interrogated/arrested/indicted/convicted on basis of potentially Cellbritally tainted evidence should rush to the relevant courts on behalf of their clients. Won't be easy in certain regimes though...

     
    Those appeals probably wouldn't get far. It wouldn't be too hard (if expensive for their client) for Cellebrite to be able to show that files aren't corrupted by redoing it with UFED.
    edited April 27 watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 13
    mknelson said:
    Hubro said:
    Just an SLIGHT embarrassment for Cellbrite and ALL of their clients/customers.

    ...and every lawyer of everyone ever interrogated/arrested/indicted/convicted on basis of potentially Cellbritally tainted evidence should rush to the relevant courts on behalf of their clients. Won't be easy in certain regimes though...

     
    Those appeals probably wouldn't get far. It wouldn't be too hard (if expensive for their client) for Cellebrite to be able to show that files aren't corrupted by redoing it with UFED.
    Judges and jurys seriously dislikes doubt.
    edited April 27 watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 13
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 659member
    How 


    the table is turning.
    Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 13
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,048member
    DAalseth said:
    Cellebrite is a company that builds forensic devices used by law enforcement, governments, and others that can get their hands on one by legal and illegal means.
    Fixed that for you. Don’t for a second think that only the “good guys” have these things. 
    Especially as one fell out of a truck in front of Signal!  Not saying whether Signal are bad or good guys, just noting that if someone with no special governmental access was able to get one, there are plenty out in the wild.
    Yeah, I found the account by Signal's CEO to be quite entertaining!

    FTGs (fork these guys).

    I wonder if Apple is going to turn the screws on them using its installer files within their software (as reported by Signal CEO), surely a violation of their terms.
    Part of me hopes they do but I also wonder if quashing celebrate would simply end up re-kindling the government push for a backdoor. In some ways the presence of a device like celebrite makes a defecto truce. The biggest problem is the fact that Celebrite appears to have no control over their devices and no way to disable a device that falls into the wrong hands (or falls off of a truck!)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 13
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 975member
    Preserving a “chain of evidence” is so important to law enforcement.  I wonder if Celebrite assisted cases are now in jeopardy?
    watto_cobra
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