Apple products must come with three-year warranty in Spain

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in General Discussion
Apple will be required to offer at least three years of warranty in Spain after the country approved a new national consumer protection standard.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


The Spanish Council of Ministers recently approved extending the existing warranty period to a mandatory three years, Spain-based blog iPadizate has reported. According to Spain's Ministry of Consumer Affairs, the move is meant to take the country a step further toward a circular economy.

It isn't clear when the new regulation will take effect, but it will impact all new Apple devices sold in the country. That includes both iPhone and iPad models, as well as Apple Watch and Mac devices.

Along with the additional year of warranty coverage, manufacturers will be required to keep spare parts for devices for a minimum of 10 years, up from five. Spain is also bumping its limitation period from three years to five.

There are other details in the new consumer protection regulations, including mandating that consumers be able to choose whether they want a replacement device or a repair for a defective product.

Apple officially offers a one-year warranty on iPhone products in addition to local rights provided by country-specific consumer laws.

This isn't the first time Apple has had to comply with local regulations that differ from its own policies or procedures. In France, for example, Apple is required to keep shipping EarPods with its iPhone devices. Apple has also been forced to include chargers with new iPhones sold in the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    Congratulations Spaniards, prices for your Tech gadgets are about to go up!
    lkruppbaconstangevolutred oakmike1watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 22
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,636member
    dee_dee said:
    Congratulations Spaniards, prices for your Tech gadgets are about to go up!
    Funny how people don’t think about that when they scream and holler about warranties. The prices will have go up at least as much as an AppleCare contract costs. What, people think the manufacturer will absorb the increased warranty costs? 
    dee_deeviclauyycmike1watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 22
    ...curious - I'd like to see life cycle costs in comparison to the (enigmatic 3 year current?) orphaning of security updates that seems the unofficial macOS system software regimen... Personally I'd vote for a target of a 10 year software support cycle (W7?) as well, and look to more voluntary upgrade options on both merit and consumer demand, lest the customer be relegated to being held to ransom out of fear for security vulnerability simply to feed development...?
    edited April 27 elijahg
  • Reply 4 of 22
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    dee_dee said:
    Congratulations Spaniards, prices for your Tech gadgets are about to go up!
    Why do you think that will be the case?

    If that were to be the result, upgrade cycles would probably be extended but pricing would be irrevelant in the context of the reasons for this change (which I haven't heard anything about yet anyway).

    For over a decade now the cost of recuperating, recycling and safe disposal of electrical and electronic equipment has been included in the purchase price.

    At this point in time very few people are aware of that fact because it didn't have a major impact on price. I doubt that an extra year of warranty will have either. 
    edited April 27 CloudTalkinfred1dysamoriaronn
  • Reply 5 of 22
    ipilyaipilya Posts: 195member
    dee_dee said:
    Congratulations Spaniards, prices for your Tech gadgets are about to go up!
    wow... nice! I hope this happens before I buy my new iPad Pro ( btw - its only 1 additional year) - and yeah... if it does, then I will simply buy in France or Italy :smiley: 
    viclauyyc
  • Reply 6 of 22
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,506member
    Macs at least should have 3 year warranty across the board - they're "premium" after all. Hell, Crappy Lenovo has a 3 year on-site warranty on its $530 desktops. Apple can't have much faith in their hardware.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 7 of 22
    I live in Spain and I dont think prices will increase.

    In UK the customer protection is stronger again and generally prices are slightly less in UK.

    Be nice to know when it will take effect.
    fred1watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    ...curious - I'd like to see life cycle costs in comparison to the (enigmatic 3 year current?) orphaning of security updates that seems the unofficial macOS system software regimen... Personally I'd vote for a target of a 10 year software support cycle (W7?) as well, and look to more voluntary upgrade options on both merit and consumer demand, lest the customer be relegated to being held to ransom out of fear for security vulnerability simply to feed development...?
    I'm not up to date of the outcome, but there's certainly been legal/regulatory cases where this has been an issue relating to Android mobiles as they can (should) be deemed unsafe to use without security updates. The pressure on that issue is one reason for the (slight) improvement of Android updating policies. One could easily buy a 3 year old iPhone or iPad, but if one do that with Android the device would be obsolete.

    In some parts of the world the manufacturers work hard to avoid cellular phones and pads being regarded as products with a more than 5 year lifecycle (which they are wrt technical construction and quality). Now, they are regarded as products ment to last more than 3 years, hence 3 year warranty.

    There are some other nice rules protecting consumers too: If a device fails within 6 months of purchase, the seller/manufacturer has the burden of proof - to show it's not a production flaw. After 6 months, the consumer has the burden of proof. Also: Credit to Dell for their policy replacing monitors with flaws. They ship the new one first, and when you receive the replacement you return the old one.

    Businesses/Corporations are not covered by the consumer laws, hence the need for Apple Care or the great Thinkpad service contracts. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    ppietrappietra Posts: 278member
    Hubro said:
    ...curious - I'd like to see life cycle costs in comparison to the (enigmatic 3 year current?) orphaning of security updates that seems the unofficial macOS system software regimen... Personally I'd vote for a target of a 10 year software support cycle (W7?) as well, and look to more voluntary upgrade options on both merit and consumer demand, lest the customer be relegated to being held to ransom out of fear for security vulnerability simply to feed development...?
    I'm not up to date of the outcome, but there's certainly been legal/regulatory cases where this has been an issue relating to Android mobiles as they can (should) be deemed unsafe to use without security updates. The pressure on that issue is one reason for the (slight) improvement of Android updating policies. One could easily buy a 3 year old iPhone or iPad, but if one do that with Android the device would be obsolete.

    In some parts of the world the manufacturers work hard to avoid cellular phones and pads being regarded as products with a more than 5 year lifecycle (which they are wrt technical construction and quality). Now, they are regarded as products ment to last more than 3 years, hence 3 year warranty.

    There are some other nice rules protecting consumers too: If a device fails within 6 months of purchase, the seller/manufacturer has the burden of proof - to show it's not a production flaw. After 6 months, the consumer has the burden of proof. Also: Credit to Dell for their policy replacing monitors with flaws. They ship the new one first, and when you receive the replacement you return the old one.

    Businesses/Corporations are not covered by the consumer laws, hence the need for Apple Care or the great Thinkpad service contracts. 
    There are even countries where the seller/manufacturer has the burden of proof for device defects for the first 2 years.
    edited April 28
  • Reply 10 of 22
    ppietrappietra Posts: 278member

    dee_dee said:
    Congratulations Spaniards, prices for your Tech gadgets are about to go up!
    Prices will probably go up but not by much. The warranty in Spain is already 2 years, and there are other European countries with more demanding laws and yet the price isn’t too different.
    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 22
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    ...curious - I'd like to see life cycle costs in comparison to the (enigmatic 3 year current?) orphaning of security updates that seems the unofficial macOS system software regimen... Personally I'd vote for a target of a 10 year software support cycle (W7?) as well, and look to more voluntary upgrade options on both merit and consumer demand, lest the customer be relegated to being held to ransom out of fear for security vulnerability simply to feed development...?
    I did some investigating on the new proposals. It's true that they have been approved but they won't actually come into force until they are published in the official state bulletin. That shouldn't take long.

    The actual proposals were in response to ongoing EU evaluations of all manner of consumers protections (which should be fully updated by 2024 if all goes to plan) .

    The info is here:

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-9-2020-0209_EN.html#

    Perhaps of note to you would be this snippet which I find interesting and beneficial:

    "7. Stresses that goods with digital elements require particular attention and that the following elements should be taken into account within the review of Directive (EU) 2019/771 to be carried out by 2024:

    a. corrective updates – i.e. security and conformity updates – must continue throughout the estimated lifespan of the device, according to product category,

    b. corrective updates should be kept separate from evolutive updates, which must be reversible, and no update must ever diminish the performance or responsiveness of the goods,

    c. consumers must be informed by the seller at the moment of purchase of the period during which updates to the software supplied on purchase of the goods can be expected to be provided, in a way that is compatible with innovation and possible future market developments, as well as of their specificities and impacts on device performance, to ensure that the goods maintain their conformity and security"
    edited April 28 MplsPmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 12 of 22
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,437member
    avon b7 said:
    ...curious - I'd like to see life cycle costs in comparison to the (enigmatic 3 year current?) orphaning of security updates that seems the unofficial macOS system software regimen... Personally I'd vote for a target of a 10 year software support cycle (W7?) as well, and look to more voluntary upgrade options on both merit and consumer demand, lest the customer be relegated to being held to ransom out of fear for security vulnerability simply to feed development...?
    I did some investigating on the new proposals. It's true that they have been approved but they won't actually come into force until they are published in the official state bulletin. That shouldn't take long.

    The actual proposals were in response to ongoing EU evaluations of all manner of consumers protections (which should be fully updated by 2024 if all goes to plan) .

    The info is here:

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-9-2020-0209_EN.html#

    Perhaps of note to you would be this snippet which I find interesting and beneficial:

    "7. Stresses that goods with digital elements require particular attention and that the following elements should be taken into account within the review of Directive (EU) 2019/771 to be carried out by 2024:

    a. corrective updates – i.e. security and conformity updates – must continue throughout the estimated lifespan of the device, according to product category,

    b. corrective updates should be kept separate from evolutive updates, which must be reversible, and no update must ever diminish the performance or responsiveness of the goods,

    c. consumers must be informed by the seller at the moment of purchase of the period during which updates to the software supplied on purchase of the goods can be expected to be provided, in a way that is compatible with innovation and possible future market developments, as well as of their specificities and impacts on device performance, to ensure that the goods maintain their conformity and security"
    Parts a and b shouldn’t be an issue for Apple - they routinely continue to provide security updates and bug fixes longer than most companies and definitely longer than 3 years. 

    Part c is a bit dicey - how is Apple (or any company) supposed to fully anticipate future software and hardware development to provide that information?

    as far as the cost of goods goes, if it applies to all smart phones, it shouldn’t affect Apple more than any other company. If anything, it should help Apple. As I said, they already support their phones longer than many/most manufacturers so any relative cost increase should affect other devices more. Apple’s hardware is also well constructed - I don’t think I’ve ever had an iPhone fail in less than 4-5 years, including devices family members own. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 22
    The consumer purchase law in Norway applies for up to five years on Macs, iPhones and similar items, with the notable exception of batteries, which are usually covered for two years.
    ronnwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 22
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    elijahg said:
    Macs at least should have 3 year warranty across the board - they're "premium" after all. Hell, Crappy Lenovo has a 3 year on-site warranty on its $530 desktops. Apple can't have much faith in their hardware.
    That’s exactly it, but watch the fanboys jump in with special pleading defense: “Apple’s products aren’t as cheaply made as Lenovo, so you can’t make that comparison!!” It’s actually the opposite: if they’re willing to stand by a cheaper product, Apple not standing by their more expensive product calls to question that product’s value.

    [excised corporate bootlicking commentary; it has no effect on anti-regulation types but to make them more brick wall-like]

    The history of most products is that multiple year warranties were THE NORM, and for a long time. As in, back when things used to cost LESS, be built BETTER, and LAST LONGER. People's lack of memory, and tendency to think “the way it is now is the way it’s always been” is a great boon to corporatism.

    Reducing warranty, making products shorter lived & less robust... these are just ways corporations have increased their profits over the decades. There’s so very little left to squeeze out of the stone, but they keep trying because the rich executives and primary shareholders can never be satisfied.

    With all the things companies have done to lower their own expenses, few have lowered prices of products. Economy of scale has covered adding complexity to products at lower price points (because it just gets integrated into standard parts), but then they raise those prices as well.

    Look at packaged goods: packages get filled less, and even get slightly smaller, but the price is “the same” as it was before the packaging change; all to fool customers into not seeing the increase in price. Same for electronics: shorter warranty period, shorter lifespan, fewer options, less support, more disposable... and don’t forget reductions in labor force, outsourcing of labor to “cheaper” (more abusive) regions and erosion of benefits.

    And every time someone says “we need to regulate this to improve things”, some laissez-faire capitalist screams “that will increase prices!!”

    It’s not because monstrous corporations have no room in their profit margins to lower prices for customers. In lowering company costs, when choosing to increase profits without also lowering the cost to customers, it’s just greed. We have a culture that supports and worships this greed and primes people to attack anyone who suggests ethics ought to matter.

    Any company that increases their prices over  government doing the right thing and mandating a 3-year minimum “stand by our own products” warranty period is doing it for greed. Don’t help them brainwash the masses into believing it’s necessary.
    avon b7
  • Reply 15 of 22
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,581member
    This means all electronics gadgets will have 3 years warranty. Than, why stop here. Everything sold in Spain should have 3 years warranty.
  • Reply 16 of 22
    wood1208 said:
    This means all electronics gadgets will have 3 years warranty. Than, why stop here. Everything sold in Spain should have 3 years warranty.
    Absolutely not. How will you ever have a reason to complain about the product deficiencies of a 3 year old banana?
  • Reply 17 of 22
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    wood1208 said:
    This means all electronics gadgets will have 3 years warranty. Than, why stop here. Everything sold in Spain should have 3 years warranty.
    From the link I posted above:

    "H. whereas Directive (EU) 2019/771 is to be reviewed by 2024; whereas a number of measures aimed at creating the right conditions for increasing product durability and ensuring a high level of consumer protection, as well as a competitive business environment, should be assessed in preparation for this review; whereas the two-year legal guarantee period might not be appropriate for all product categories with a higher estimated lifetime;"

    "product categories". That is quite clear. It will probably be the same in Spain but first, the law must be published in the state bulletin. 
    edited April 28 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 18 of 22
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,946member
    My expectation is that any product manufacturer, Apple being only one of many, is required to take on additional financial burden to do business in Spain they will simply factor this additional cost of doing business in Spain into their cost of doing business as a whole. This is not a big deal at all. Total nothingburger.

    There's absolutely nothing strange or extraordinary about it. Companies that decide to do business in a specific locale almost always have to make accommodations to conform to local laws, regulations, and a plethora of other localized requirements whether they are selling high tech gadgets, toilet paper, or bananas. Companies can, and often do, decide not to do businesses in certain locales because they do not want to take on the additional burdens, technicalities, or competitive challenges associated with doing business there. Doing business anywhere in the world always means following the rules of the host country. It's non negotiable.

    For global businesses like Apple, having one country, e.g., Spain, imposing additional costs likely means that everyone worldwide will likely pay a little more for Apple products to offset Apple's additional cost. Hopefully the hit on everyone, including Spanish customers, will be very small in this specific instance because Spain likely represents a fairly small percentage of Apple's total customer base. The myriad of reasons behind an additional cost to Apple is not really an issue. Cost is cost, especially when it's non negotiable. They'll factor it into their business model.

    Business is business, and Apple is running its business to provide the best value for its stakeholders, which include shareholders, employees, suppliers, customers, and communities. The number of Apple stakeholders is in the hundreds of millions and the benefits of Apple's success or failure are shared by all of them. It's not like there is some evil Mr Big raking in all the cash and trying to take over the world and holding us in bondage and servitude. It's hundreds of millions of people whose financial future is tied to Apple, including pretty much anyone who has an IRA, 401K, mutual funds, direct stockholders, communities in which stakeholders live, vendors and suppliers of Apple, etc.

    Whenever I hear Apple described as "greedy" I wonder whether the person making the claim realizes that they are very likely a target of the barb they're slinging, because in all likelihood they too are a beneficiary of Apple's success. We need more businesses to be operating as businesses, and ideally, doing it at least half as well as Apple is doing it.
    mike1
  • Reply 19 of 22
    Virtually all manufacturers of products will occasionally deliver a subpar product of some sort. First production series, incidents during production/transport/storage and so on. The responsibility resides within the chain between the seller and  the manufacturer. Consumer laws places the responsibility and induces fiscal consequences for product failures.

    The ambition is not to punish manufacturers but to encourage them to actually provide the product they have sold. And, off course, to make sure that the consumer gets what he/she purchased and get reimbursed if not.

    There should hardly be extra costs for the manufacturers as they most likely would have had these costs in the production, design and quality control IF to keep and ensure the required quality anyway.    
  • Reply 20 of 22
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    this is a curious comment from the blog "Durability of a product as an objective criterion: when a good does not have the durability that the company and the consumer have agreed to through the purchase contract, the customer can choose between its repair or replacement ."
    how are they defining "the company" "purchase contract". is this with Apple, is there a time limit that defines if something was durable the time of the contract etc or is this a 'it fails during the 3 years, this applies' and Apple has to fix it regardless of who sold it then that's actually a "warranty" in the way that Apple defines the term
    but if "the company" means the seller, which might not always be Apple, and there's something like those "if it tails within the first X months it's automatically assumed that the seller provided a shit item but afterwards the consumer has to prove it was a shit item when bought" then it's the same consumer protection laws as basically everywhere else aside from adding that the customer gets to pick if they get a repair or a new one. 

    and I won't be shocked if Apple gets around that 10 year rule by saying that between years 7-10 they will replace the item with a comparable but newer product. just so they don't have to keep making parts that will only be used in one country. that's even what they do in California for some items. because the cost of just upgrading someone is way cheaper than keeping a line open for those rarely used parts
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