Apple touts flexibility of M1 chip ahead of 24-inch iMac release

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited May 14
A pair of Apple marketing managers in an interview Thursday threw a spotlight on the company's M1 system-on-chip design, noting the silicon now powers a range of mobile and desktop devices.

24-inch iMac


Ahead of an expected May 21 release of the redesigned, M1-powered 24-inch iMac, Apple's product marketing manager Stephen Tonna and Mac product marketing manager Laura Metz spoke with CNN about the virtues of deploying a single processor across multiple platforms.

Apple's M1 debuted with MacBook Air, 13-inch MacBook Pro and Mac mini last year, and more recently found its way into desktop and tablet designs with the 24-inch iMac and iPad Pro.

Metz said it is "awesome to have a range of devices that do meet your needs, whether you know you need to be moving around and you want this portable device or you need something in a small compact space or this wonderful all in one experience with the large display."

While M1 has been lauded for being a highly efficient yet powerful mobile chip, it remains unclear how the silicon will perform as a desktop power plant. Early benchmarks captured by Geekbench this week show the actively-cooled M1 variant in iMac achieving a single-core score that is some 56% higher than the Intel silicon found in the 2019 21.5-inch iMac. Multi-core scores are about 24% faster.

M1 begins to fall behind when compared to the multi-core scores of a 10th-generation Intel Core i7 processor, which is available on the 27-inch iMac, though it stays ahead in single-core performance.

Metz and Tonna also commented on iMac's colorful new design, as well as general platform features like Continuity, iCloud services and software updates.

"You just have the freedom to use devices however you want," Tonna said. "You don't have to think about what's where you just know, it will be updated. And I think that's a really big value proposition for our users."

Orders for the 24-inch iMac went live on April 30 and are slated to arrive on May 21. Pricier configurations quickly sold out and all models are now showing delivery dates pushed back into June.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,722member
    I've used Apple computers through every processor migration - now, at last, their own silicon. I'll be employing my Intel-based system until necessary software migration is complete, it will be interesting to see how well non-native programs perform. Anyone here unable to move over due to software constraints?
    boboliciouswilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 7
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 32,999member
    iqatedo said:
    I've used Apple computers through every processor migration - now, at last, their own silicon. I'll be employing my Intel-based system until necessary software migration is complete, it will be interesting to see how well non-native programs perform. Anyone here unable to move over due to software constraints?
    I bought the Macbook Pro last year. I want to replace the now ancient 15”Macbook Pro used as a server for my A/V system, but some of the software for that isn’t yet ready. It’s ok, because I’m playing around with it with other software. So far, I’ve been surprised at what it can handle. 16GB RAM and 1TB start-up. I don’t recommend the 256 storage as not only is that really squeezing it, but 256 drives are usually not much more than half the speed of 512 and up.
    iqatedowatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 7
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,296member
    iqatedo said:
    I've used Apple computers through every processor migration - now, at last, their own silicon. I'll be employing my Intel-based system until necessary software migration is complete, it will be interesting to see how well non-native programs perform. Anyone here unable to move over due to software constraints?
    I upgraded from a 2015 MBP to the new one and non-native apps running under Rosetta feel about the same as they did on my old machine (maybe slightly faster).  No software constraints so far.
    iqatedowilliamlondonasdasdwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 7
    boboliciousbobolicious Posts: 820member
    iqatedo said:
    I've used Apple computers through every processor migration - now, at last, their own silicon. I'll be employing my Intel-based system until necessary software migration is complete, it will be interesting to see how well non-native programs perform. Anyone here unable to move over due to software constraints?
    I would have preferred a Mojave 'rosetta' transition if it could have offered emulation support for 32 bit legacy apps...  I too have shifted from 'early adopter enthusiast' pre 2011 to need based 'last post' given Apple's shift to more onerous annual macOS cycles vs what seemed release on merit for the customer... I'm consciously still holding @ High Sierra which mostly 'just works', lets me focus on the tasks at hand rather than workflow reinvention and saves fiddling with 'onboard' storage and the proprietary T2 grab bag... Let the flames begin...
    edited May 14 williamlondoniqatedo
  • Reply 5 of 7
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,722member
    melgross said:
    iqatedo said:
    I've used Apple computers through every processor migration - now, at last, their own silicon. I'll be employing my Intel-based system until necessary software migration is complete, it will be interesting to see how well non-native programs perform. Anyone here unable to move over due to software constraints?
    I bought the Macbook Pro last year. I want to replace the now ancient 15”Macbook Pro used as a server for my A/V system, but some of the software for that isn’t yet ready. It’s ok, because I’m playing around with it with other software. So far, I’ve been surprised at what it can handle. 16GB RAM and 1TB start-up. I don’t recommend the 256 storage as not only is that really squeezing it, but 256 drives are usually not much more than half the speed of 512 and up.
    I've gone for 16 GB of RAM and the 1 TB drive. The other change I've made - applause begins now - is the keyboard with numeric keypad - yay!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 7
    Fidonet127Fidonet127 Posts: 256member
    Our new iMac has shipped. Green, mid tier, 16gb ram, 256 hd. No software constraints noted with our other M1 Macs. This iMac will replace a 2014 Mac mini which most of the stuff was running off external HDs and hubs anyhow. 

    I can understand why people want old os for old software, etc, however updates are no longer offered and you don’t benefit from the better security of the newer OSs. From the point of security, I don’t see the point of staying with the old OSs. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 7
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 978member
    I have a new 16” inch MBP running Bug Sur but still get a lot of use from my 7 year old MPB running High Sierra.  I love the fact that my gmail is not linked to my Safari browser with that OS and limits data collection from Google. It’s great to have a computer that is a few steps behind especially if it runs a SSD.
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
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