Intel-based MacBook Pro is Intel's latest anti-Apple campaign target

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 49
    cg27cg27 Posts: 134member
    entropys said:
    I bought my son a PC because he wants to game, otherwise at home we are a Mac house.  
    There is a bit of an issue if you want the laptop to be used for other purposes than gaming though, as a gaming laptop are big, noisy, heavy and the battery gets to two hours on a good day.
    stepping back to say, an XPS or thinkpad for portability and battery life you end up with a lesser GPU for gaming, just like the MBP.
    I think we’d be looking at a desktop rather than laptop for the very reasons you stated.  And no point in paying a premium for a laptop when my son games from his room.  Heaven forbid if he were walking around the house hanging out in various rooms yelling at his buds during multiplayer games.

    Hoping for some good WWDC gaming news.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 49
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 952member
    It’s not correct to say that windows computers are better at games than 100% of macs. 

    That’s simply untrue. 

    SOME windows computers are better than any Mac. 

    And that has to do with graphics card availability as well as developer choice. 

    So glad Apple is making their own silicon and APIs. Taking a lot of the stupid out of that argument. 

    Forthcoming Apple GPUs will be intense. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 43 of 49
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 952member
    Wgkrueger said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    Interesting that the Mac has now become the the computer for "Serious" computer users and Windows/PC the computer for those that play games.
    Nice logic there!  Because Windows excels at gaming, you're consensus is that no one uses it for "serious" computing?  Tell that to the 90+ percent of businesses that use Windows servers and clients for their business.  How many businesses would you estimate use Mac to run their business (accounting, HR, management, etc.)...you know the real "serious" stuff?
    Sure, Windows business computing like waiting for virus scanning to complete, living in fear of whether your system will boot after the weekly MS OS fix update, hours of researching what tedious registry manipulations are needed to make your system work correctly, wondering what the heck is on your computer screen after corporate IT pushed out their monthly changes. Yeah, Windows Business Computing.
    This. Windows made a whole e I system out of duct taping it together. There are multiple industries that thrive due to the steaming pile that is windows. 

    Used to be a die hard ms guy. Fortunate enough to have me engineers instructing my mcse classes. 

    Then one day a friend at work challenged me to do some basic tasks on my Alienware windows desktop destroyer and his lowly Mac laptop. 

    The laptop won. Impossible I thought. Something is tricky. 

    Then I bought a Mac so I could learn it in and out in order to support a growing user base. 

    And one day it hit me: I’d grown so familiar with windows and office and the NEED to baby the software, maintain, troubleshoot, and fix it so often, that I never thought there could be any other way of computing life. 

    Enter the Mac. A laptop. 

    Never had to do anything. Turned it on, performed admirably. Reliably. Always. Closed the lid to sleep and reopened. Guess what? It awakened to life flawlessly. Every time. This was a pipe dream in the windows side. Never knew what would happen. Pc Basically needed a reboot more times than I’d care to count. 

    Mac users were supposed to be “non techie” and “simple” people who valued aesthetics more than the “smart people who do real work” on the windows machines. 

    Yet, the Mac users needed the least support by far (other than tutelage on how to master software usage-just like the windows users) and were more productive as they didn’t have the number of hardware and software issues, note the lengthy troubleshooting when an issue had arisen. 

    Windows is just bad business. They talk ROI forever. But it’s a lie. The true ROI is had with Macs. You spend a little more up front - then reap the rewards and dividends for years to come. 
    cg27watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 49
    danoxdanox Posts: 679member
    Hopefully Apple will get serious about providing the raw materials needed for a good gaming experience now that they have the M series chips, they also need to get serious about Cad and 3D programs too, provide the best hardware and software tools possible….
    Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 45 of 49
    cg27cg27 Posts: 134member

    Forthcoming Apple GPUs will be intense. 
    So then I’ll figure out a way to stall getting my son a PC.  I’ll gladly pay for a MacBook Pro or iMac Pro if it can do proper gaming rather than take on the hassles of managing Windows.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 46 of 49
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,403moderator
    Gamers have a bit of a reputation for being more introverted and maybe not so social.  Apple is a very social company.

    Among the most compute demanding games are the many first person shooter variety.  Violence is an accepted part of the gaming realm.  Apple isn’t so much into the whole violent games scene.

    The cutting edge of the gaming market demands a lot of juice, often drawn through a wall socket from a coal- or oil-fired power plant.  I believe this makes Apple ‘uncomfortable.’  Yes, Apple wants to make machines that rip through compute and graphics tasks, but I think the company feels more comfortable doing that for productive tasks; those that have some real-world value.  Gaming doesn’t cross into that realm so easily as crunching video files or other intensive tasks that can (don’t always) serve society and are more necessary.  This is, I believe, part of the reason we haven’t seen Apple making a big push on Intel Macs in the high-end gaming market.  This, I believe, is why, when we see Apple touting a video game, it’s usually on their iOS hardware, which is far less power hungry versus their Intel Macs, and touting how those much more power-efficient iOS devices can run games as fast as [far less power-efficient] PCs .  But I think with Apple Silicon we may finally see Apple feeling more comfortable pushing high-end gaming on Macs.  
    Beatswilliamlondonkillroywatto_cobra
  • Reply 47 of 49
    Wait - serious gaming on a slim portable with a sealed-off chassis and basic cooling? Wouldn’t that burn the components before long?
    edited June 2 williamlondonmaltzkillroy
  • Reply 48 of 49
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,179member
    Gamers have a bit of a reputation for being more introverted and maybe not so social.  Apple is a very social company.

    Among the most compute demanding games are the many first person shooter variety.  Violence is an accepted part of the gaming realm.  Apple isn’t so much into the whole violent games scene.
    You don't have to make violent games to succeed.  Just look at the library of games from Nintendo.  Even Sony and MS have very successful non-violent games, like Ratchet & Clank and Ori, among many others.  
    The cutting edge of the gaming market demands a lot of juice, often drawn through a wall socket from a coal- or oil-fired power plant.  I believe this makes Apple ‘uncomfortable.’  Yes, Apple wants to make machines that rip through compute and graphics tasks, but I think the company feels more comfortable doing that for productive tasks; those that have some real-world value.  Gaming doesn’t cross into that realm so easily as crunching video files or other intensive tasks that can (don’t always) serve society and are more necessary.  This is, I believe, part of the reason we haven’t seen Apple making a big push on Intel Macs in the high-end gaming market.  This, I believe, is why, when we see Apple touting a video game, it’s usually on their iOS hardware, which is far less power hungry versus their Intel Macs, and touting how those much more power-efficient iOS devices can run games as fast as [far less power-efficient] PCs .  But I think with Apple Silicon we may finally see Apple feeling more comfortable pushing high-end gaming on Macs.  
    Apple "feels more comfortable doing that" because they didn't succeed in gaming.  I'm sure they had succeed, they would have push Mac to gamers.  I don't see how the M1 chip could change that.  Gaming has been huge with "inefficient" Intel chips.  Same as Nintendo, which has massive success with the Switch, the device with the lowest specs compared to Xbox and PS. 

    I don't think that Apple pushing gaming in iOS is related power efficiency.  It's just market share.  iOS devices are massively more popular than Mac's.  If Apple want to move gamers to their platform is with iOS devices, not Macs.  Plus Apple POV of upgradeability is the oposite to the gaming market.  You see gamers upgrading their devices in a frequent basis.  Compare that to Apple, which forces you to replace a device when you want to add RAM, SSD or replace a GPU.  

    Maybe Apple have something that could make gamers move to Mac.  But as today, I don't see that. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 49 of 49
    danvmdanvm Posts: 1,179member
    Wgkrueger said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    Interesting that the Mac has now become the the computer for "Serious" computer users and Windows/PC the computer for those that play games.
    Nice logic there!  Because Windows excels at gaming, you're consensus is that no one uses it for "serious" computing?  Tell that to the 90+ percent of businesses that use Windows servers and clients for their business.  How many businesses would you estimate use Mac to run their business (accounting, HR, management, etc.)...you know the real "serious" stuff?
    Sure, Windows business computing like waiting for virus scanning to complete, living in fear of whether your system will boot after the weekly MS OS fix update, hours of researching what tedious registry manipulations are needed to make your system work correctly, wondering what the heck is on your computer screen after corporate IT pushed out their monthly changes. Yeah, Windows Business Computing.
    This. Windows made a whole e I system out of duct taping it together. There are multiple industries that thrive due to the steaming pile that is windows. 

    Used to be a die hard ms guy. Fortunate enough to have me engineers instructing my mcse classes. 

    Then one day a friend at work challenged me to do some basic tasks on my Alienware windows desktop destroyer and his lowly Mac laptop. 

    The laptop won. Impossible I thought. Something is tricky. 

    Then I bought a Mac so I could learn it in and out in order to support a growing user base. 

    And one day it hit me: I’d grown so familiar with windows and office and the NEED to baby the software, maintain, troubleshoot, and fix it so often, that I never thought there could be any other way of computing life. 

    Enter the Mac. A laptop. 

    Never had to do anything. Turned it on, performed admirably. Reliably. Always. Closed the lid to sleep and reopened. Guess what? It awakened to life flawlessly. Every time. This was a pipe dream in the windows side. Never knew what would happen. Pc Basically needed a reboot more times than I’d care to count. 

    Mac users were supposed to be “non techie” and “simple” people who valued aesthetics more than the “smart people who do real work” on the windows machines. 

    Yet, the Mac users needed the least support by far (other than tutelage on how to master software usage-just like the windows users) and were more productive as they didn’t have the number of hardware and software issues, note the lengthy troubleshooting when an issue had arisen. 

    Windows is just bad business. They talk ROI forever. But it’s a lie. The true ROI is had with Macs. You spend a little more up front - then reap the rewards and dividends for years to come. 
    I don't know how long was your experience, but with Windows 10 neither me or my customers had major issues.  Some of them +7 years PC's working without issues.  I know that there are cases where users have problems with Windows, but the same can be said of macOS.  Looks like there is no perfect OS.  
    muthuk_vanalingam
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