Microsoft announces Apple Silicon compatible browser-based Windows 365

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 31
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,728member
    chadbag said:
    No, this doesn't render the question moot. There are lots of use cases that this "Cloud PC" does not cover. 

    As a quick example, software that controls hardware physically connected to it.  
    I don't think this is being marketed as a 100% solution for all use-cases.  If course this would not work for machines that are connected other devices, and the status-quo will still continue to work for these.
    sconosciuto
  • Reply 22 of 31
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,105member
    I thought you could already do that with Citrix.
    Sort of. On an iPad the experience is rather, unpleasant is the word.
    I was quite glad when we went office 360 enterprise, as I could use native Mac and iPad versions and just log on.  
    I am not convinced a cloud browser based service is the go, due to outage issues that do happen, and in my job, remote activities where cyclones might have destroyed cell towers.
    edited July 14 watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 31
    Until you're sitting on an airplane for 6 hrs trying to get some work done....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 31
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,467member
    sflocal said:
    chadbag said:
    No, this doesn't render the question moot. There are lots of use cases that this "Cloud PC" does not cover. 

    As a quick example, software that controls hardware physically connected to it.  
    I don't think this is being marketed as a 100% solution for all use-cases.  If course this would not work for machines that are connected other devices, and the status-quo will still continue to work for these.
    I never said it did :).  I am referring to the article which said that this renders the question of bootcamp going  away, moot.   Which it does not.  
    mknelsonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 31
    seanjseanj Posts: 255member
    Back to the 1960’s using a VM running on someone else’s remote located mainframe, but this time you get to dumb down your Mac to be a terminal…
    At least in those days the VM would be running a real operating system, such as Unix.
  • Reply 26 of 31
    iadlibiadlib Posts: 84member
    Lol remember when Oracle wanted to buy Apple and move it to something like this? Or was it Oracle tried to get Apple to do thin clients. Anyway, how bad is windows now
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 31
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,753member
    seanj said:
    Back to the 1960’s using a VM running on someone else’s remote located mainframe, but this time you get to dumb down your Mac to be a terminal…
    At least in those days the VM would be running a real operating system, such as Unix.
    Not a decade before it’s completion they wouldn’t. Even VSE or MVS were 70s products. You’d be thinking of DOS/360 or similar but not sure if it supported VMs.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 31
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,753member
    sflocal said:
    mcdave said:
    sflocal said:
    rob53 said:
    It’s going to be slow even with fast internet. 

    I can see many uses for this, particularly when it comes to using iPads if it’s done correctly.
    Really? iPad users are used to responsive, native apps built for touch. The first time they try Windows’ pitiful touch effort through a browser they’ll laugh, at first, then get angry at the idiot who inflicted this upon them. Good luck!
    Give it a rest.  I'm going to park my opinions until Microsoft actually introduces it and we can see first-hand how it works.  I have clients that are Windows-only, and all their apps are Windows-only.  No non-WinTel.  Some are in a very industrial/dirty environments that are brutal on PC's and we have discussed using iPads but remote-desktop for iOS is not adequate.  I suspect Microsoft is providing this for the mobile crowd as well, and that includes iPads.  I'll be watching this closely.
    Then buy Windows PCs. I don’t see how running through a browser will fix Windows touch issues MS can’t even resolve natively. Web & touch are diabolical too. Don’t hold your breath.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 31
    I've been working remotely using a Citrix-based solution (via the MS Remote Desktop Mac client) that provides a user shell running Windows - this for about 9 months since the work-supported VPN (Pulse Secure) had issues with an upgrade. It has been flawless for my use case (software development and support), allowing me to RDP to our servers as required, hooked into the relevant Active Directory domain controllers... the whole works.

    This announcement from MS sounds like an effort to go direct to the customer (the big organisations needing "PC" management) rather than cede money to Citrix, and from a strategic perspective is a no-brainer. Even if they have implementation issues, their size and budget mean they can force their way into this market and ride out short-term problems. They're basically copying AWS here, which first built the capability to provision VMs with set capabilities (the MS version is Azure) and then granted the capability to have non-server versions of Windows VMs to be used as user shells (now MS has "Windows 365").

    I fully expect the licensing and configuration of this stuff to be convoluted beyond what a normal person would put up with (although of course once it "clicks" you are fine with it), and it will end up part of the landscape five years from now.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 31
    robabarobaba Posts: 159member
    With the announcement of Windows 365, which is essentially a full Windows PC in the cloud (up to 16 GB RAM and 512 GB of storage) that will run on any platform that offers a web browser, Including Mac's, IPads and IPhones, If Apple continues to insist in dummying down IPadOS, many users of the M1 IPad Pro will seek a full PC OS experience by simply running Windows 365 through a web browser on the IPad. The lack of true support for external monitors on IPadOS will mean that running Windows 365 on the IPad will be limited to 4:3 ratio on external monitors, but at least, users will get true PC apps like Windows Explorer, Office, Photoshop, etc. The only problem is that these will be Windows apps and not Mac apps. The rollout of Windows 365 may very well force Apple to unleash the true power of the M1 Ipad Pro with a much more capable IPadOS, one that is basically MacOS + touch abilities.
    Apple is not “dummying down iPad os.  iPad OS is the most capable and flexible it has ever been and they continue to enhance it.  “Drumming down” would be to render it less useful than it was previously—exactly the opposite of what is objectively happening.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 31
    robaba said:
    Apple is not “dummying down iPad os.  iPad OS is the most capable and flexible it has ever been and they continue to enhance it.  “Drumming down” would be to render it less useful than it was previously—exactly the opposite of what is objectively happening.
    True multi-tasking, external monitor support, multiple account support, true file management, pro apps, are all distressingly lacking in IPadOS (14 and 15). The M1 IPad Pro is a total waste of hardware capability with the current incarnation of IPadOS. Considering that a fully loaded 12.9" M1 IPad Pro ($2,399) is more expensive than the equivalent fully loaded M1 MacBook Air ($1,869) and the fully loaded 13" M1 MacBook Pro ($2,119), anyone with half a brain is better off buying an M1 MacBook Air or a 13" M1 MacBook Pro. The M1 chip is totally wasted on an IPad Pro with the current incarnation of IPadOS. Until Apple ceases to dum-down the IPadOS, I honestly see absolutely no reason for purchasing an M1 IPad Pro.
    muthuk_vanalingam
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