US Government, NATO accuse China of Microsoft Exchange attacks

24

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 67
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,762member
    Intellectual Property wasn’t the only thing they hacked into. We will soon see that a “certain brand” of voting machine was also hacked on November 3, 2020. This article is just an attempt to lay blame based on what is already known. Stay tuned…
    Leave the paranoid political conspiracy theories off this site please.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 67
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""



    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"? Did US government catch the SolarWind hackers? These high-tech ignorant authority are simplifying things by attributing these activity to a government and asking Chinese government to do things that no government can do. If these things are state sponsored, what does China gain by doing such things and make itself an enemy of the world? There are hackers since the beginning of PC. I have strong belief these things are done by individual person.
  • Reply 23 of 67
    6502 said:
    Microsoft OS is the worst OS in the world. Why these people don't know this fact? IBM PC users have been buying anti-virus software for decades. This is a necessity for Windows users. Why? Because hackers have been inflicting harm on IBM PC users. Do we execute them? I have not users any anti-virus on my Macs. I have received many spam emails trying to steal from me. Do we execute the senders? 
    IBM got out of the PC business 16 years ago. Windows 10 is actually quite usable. I don't use any anti-virus software except for the built-in Windows Defender.

    "I don't use any anti-virus software except for the built in".
    You must love Microsoft a lot to browse the internet and install appslications utilities etc from the internet using only Defender.
    For the rest of the world reading this thread, that is bad advice.  You are taking demonstrably and quantifiably taking a significant risk relying on Defender only. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 67
    Windows is an extremely useful tool for business and governments. But it is also the most Malware open OS by a staggering amount. If using Windows you must lock down as much as possible while allowing just what is needed. That's not hype, that is the stark reality
    DAalsethwatto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 67
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""



    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"? Did US government catch the SolarWind hackers? These high-tech ignorant authority are simplifying things by attributing these activity to a government and asking Chinese government to do things that no government can do. If these things are state sponsored, what does China gain by doing such things and make itself an enemy of the world? There are hackers since the beginning of PC. I have strong belief these things are done by individual person.

    You "rein them in" the same as you do any criminal.   You identify them, prosecute them and jail them. 
    Assuming what the EU is saying is correct I would fully expect China to do exactly that.  If they don't they will be harboring, aiding and abetting international criminals.  I don't expect them to do that -- not only because arresting them is the right thing to do -- but because pay backs are bitch.

    And, even if the U.S. is correct and the Chinese government is sponsoring this, China will likely have to do it anyway.  That way they can proclaim their innocence while taking credit for fixing the problem!  Xi is no dummy and he won't want this sword hanging over his head.

    As for Solar Wind, those were Russian hackers and most likely with the support of the Kremlin.   That's why Biden told Putin that, if they do it again to the wrong things, Putin will find that paybacks really are a bitch.   "Nice pipeline you got there Vladimir.  Be a shame if anything happened to it!".
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 67
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""



    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"? Did US government catch the SolarWind hackers? These high-tech ignorant authority are simplifying things by attributing these activity to a government and asking Chinese government to do things that no government can do. If these things are state sponsored, what does China gain by doing such things and make itself an enemy of the world? There are hackers since the beginning of PC. I have strong belief these things are done by individual person.

    You "rein them in" the same as you do any criminal.   You identify them, prosecute them and jail them. 
    Assuming what the EU is saying is correct I would fully expect China to do exactly that.  If they don't they will be harboring, aiding and abetting international criminals.  I don't expect them to do that -- not only because arresting them is the right thing to do -- but because pay backs are bitch.

    And, even if the U.S. is correct and the Chinese government is sponsoring this, China will likely have to do it anyway.  That way they can proclaim their innocence while taking credit for fixing the problem!  Xi is no dummy and he won't want this sword hanging over his head.

    As for Solar Wind, those were Russian hackers and most likely with the support of the Kremlin.   That's why Biden told Putin that, if they do it again to the wrong things, Putin will find that paybacks really are a bitch.   "Nice pipeline you got there Vladimir.  Be a shame if anything happened to it!".
    This morning local TV news said Biden said the January attack is from China. 
  • Reply 27 of 67
    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/u-s-says-china-to-blame-for-microsoft-exchange-email-hack/

    Dmitri Alperovitch (Russian: Дмитрий Михайлович Альперович; born 1980) is a Russian-born American computer security industry executive.
    The puzzle is solved. 
  • Reply 28 of 67
    65026502 Posts: 376member
    6502 said:
    Microsoft OS is the worst OS in the world. Why these people don't know this fact? IBM PC users have been buying anti-virus software for decades. This is a necessity for Windows users. Why? Because hackers have been inflicting harm on IBM PC users. Do we execute them? I have not users any anti-virus on my Macs. I have received many spam emails trying to steal from me. Do we execute the senders? 
    IBM got out of the PC business 16 years ago. Windows 10 is actually quite usable. I don't use any anti-virus software except for the built-in Windows Defender.

    "I don't use any anti-virus software except for the built in".
    You must love Microsoft a lot to browse the internet and install appslications utilities etc from the internet using only Defender.
    For the rest of the world reading this thread, that is bad advice.  You are taking demonstrably and quantifiably taking a significant risk relying on Defender only. 
    From PC Magazine:
    “We used to say Windows Defender is better than nothing. At present, we’re willing to say it’s pretty darn good. Some of its lab test scores are excellent now, though it took a while to reach this point. […] It earned a great score in our hands-on malware protection test but didn’t do so well at detecting phishing frauds.”

    I only download/install legitimate software and use common sense when on the web. I've tried other anti-virus products in the past, some have been ok, some have caused software conflicts that took quite a while to figure out. How many times have you been legitimately alerted to a virus on your computer? And, if you have, how did it get there?
    beowulfschmidt
  • Reply 29 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,868member
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 30 of 67
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 31 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,868member
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
     :smiley: 

    Ok buddy. You very smart.
    tmay
  • Reply 32 of 67
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,452member
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
    You lied to me about your being a U.S. Citizen, so now I haz a sad.
    edited July 19 watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 67
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 959member
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""



    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"? Did US government catch the SolarWind hackers? These high-tech ignorant authority are simplifying things by attributing these activity to a government and asking Chinese government to do things that no government can do. If these things are state sponsored, what does China gain by doing such things and make itself an enemy of the world? There are hackers since the beginning of PC. I have strong belief these things are done by individual person.

    You "rein them in" the same as you do any criminal.   You identify them, prosecute them and jail them. 
    Assuming what the EU is saying is correct I would fully expect China to do exactly that.  If they don't they will be harboring, aiding and abetting international criminals.  I don't expect them to do that -- not only because arresting them is the right thing to do -- but because pay backs are bitch.

    And, even if the U.S. is correct and the Chinese government is sponsoring this, China will likely have to do it anyway.  That way they can proclaim their innocence while taking credit for fixing the problem!  Xi is no dummy and he won't want this sword hanging over his head.

    As for Solar Wind, those were Russian hackers and most likely with the support of the Kremlin.   That's why Biden told Putin that, if they do it again to the wrong things, Putin will find that paybacks really are a bitch.   "Nice pipeline you got there Vladimir.  Be a shame if anything happened to it!".
    You honestly think China would arrest their own citizens for hacking western companies? Laughable. 
    tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 67
    hexclock said:
    You honestly think China would arrest their own citizens for hacking western companies? Laughable. 
    Agree. And if they did, it would only be a game for the gallery. In fact, there are many indications that the Chinese government actively promotes these kinds of activities — both financially and technically.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 67
    China is such a copycat! Now they're copying the activities of the CIA, the US is gonna be really mad!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 36 of 67
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/u-s-says-china-to-blame-for-microsoft-exchange-email-hack/

    Dmitri Alperovitch (Russian: Дмитрий Михайлович Альперович; born 1980) is a Russian-born American computer security industry executive.
    The puzzle is solved. 

    But even he admitted that this may not have been a government sponsored operation.
  • Reply 37 of 67
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
     :smiley: 

    Ok buddy. You very smart.

    MORE personal attacks from you?
  • Reply 38 of 67
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    tmay said:
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
    You lied to me about your being a U.S. Citizen, so now I haz a sad.

    The only evidence for that lies in your head.  
    Unfounded, personal attacks make your arguments look weak.
  • Reply 39 of 67
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,470member
    hexclock said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""



    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"? Did US government catch the SolarWind hackers? These high-tech ignorant authority are simplifying things by attributing these activity to a government and asking Chinese government to do things that no government can do. If these things are state sponsored, what does China gain by doing such things and make itself an enemy of the world? There are hackers since the beginning of PC. I have strong belief these things are done by individual person.

    You "rein them in" the same as you do any criminal.   You identify them, prosecute them and jail them. 
    Assuming what the EU is saying is correct I would fully expect China to do exactly that.  If they don't they will be harboring, aiding and abetting international criminals.  I don't expect them to do that -- not only because arresting them is the right thing to do -- but because pay backs are bitch.

    And, even if the U.S. is correct and the Chinese government is sponsoring this, China will likely have to do it anyway.  That way they can proclaim their innocence while taking credit for fixing the problem!  Xi is no dummy and he won't want this sword hanging over his head.

    As for Solar Wind, those were Russian hackers and most likely with the support of the Kremlin.   That's why Biden told Putin that, if they do it again to the wrong things, Putin will find that paybacks really are a bitch.   "Nice pipeline you got there Vladimir.  Be a shame if anything happened to it!".
    You honestly think China would arrest their own citizens for hacking western companies? Laughable. 

    They wouldn't -- IF you believe the western propaganda.
  • Reply 40 of 67
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,868member
    crowley said:
    crowley said:
    The Microsoft Exchange hack and many other attacks were caused by gangs working with the Chinese government, the Biden administration and NATO claim.

    Actually, NATO didn't claim that.   Aside from the usual crowd of the U.S., Britain and Canada, others are saying that Chinese hackers did some bad things -- but they are not attributing it to the Chinese government.

    From Reuters:

    "While a flurry of statements from Western powers represent a broad alliance, cyber experts said the lack of consequences for China beyond the U.S. indictment was conspicuous. Just a month ago, summit statements by G7 and NATO warned China and said it posed threats to the international order.

    Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, called Monday's announcement a "successful effort to get friends and allies to attribute the action to Beijing, but not very useful without any concrete follow-up."

    Some of Monday's statements even seemed to pull their punches. While Washington and its close allies such as the United Kingdom and Canada held the Chinese state directly responsible for the hacking, others were more circumspect.

    NATO merely said that its members "acknowledge" the allegations being leveled against Beijing by the U.S., Canada, and the UK. The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory" - a statement that left open the possibility that the Chinese government was itself innocent of directing the espionage."

    With the U.S. in full attack mode on China, it puts their allegations / assumptions into question.

    Apparently there was a hack and also a release of information to others on how to exploit it.  But there does not seem to be a lot of evidence that it was initiated and supported by the Chinese government.

    But, regardless, if the hackers were operating independently in China, it is up to China to shut them down -- at least.
    Or, as the EU put it:
    "The European Union said it was urging Chinese officials to rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory""

    How could a government rein in "malicious cyber activities undertaken from its territory"?
    For someone so defensive of China you sure do have a low opinion of their police force.
    Stop being political! I know high-tech more than you. I have given the reason not just opinion. Please respond directly to my reason. 
     :smiley: 

    Ok buddy. You very smart.

    MORE personal attacks from you?
    Come off it George. He accused me of being political in a political thread where he’s bending over backward to defend China. And he said he know more high-tech than me, which, while it may be true, was a complete non-sequitur, unprovoked and unproven. 

    Not got a word to say against your little shill pal though, have you?

    Stop stalking me, crazy man.
    tmayfastasleepwatto_cobra
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