M1X Mac mini with more ports could launch within months

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 34
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,819member
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 
    Look at the difference in depth of the connectors used by the Intel/M1 iMacs and consider that maybe the magnets make it a more secure connection than less. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 34
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,355member
    JBSlough said:
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 

    I believe the point was how thin the iMac is. After I looked at one in a Best Buy I realized there wouldn’t be room for the standard way they were connected before. It’s literally just a screen and almost as thin as an iPad. 
    crowley said:
    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    kingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 23 of 34
    AI_liasAI_lias Posts: 406member
    This is the kind of leak Apple was warning about. Knowing that an updated Mac mini will come out within a few months, with faster processor and more than 2 TB ports, will hurt the consumer. People will put off their purchases, and it will rob them of the joy and surprise they would otherwise experience during the Apple event announcing it. And the Apple event announcing it will rob them of the joy of not being able to purchase it on the day of, but having to wait maybe a few weeks for the actual release. Please stop these leaks, spare a thought for the consumers.
    kingofsomewherehotwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 34
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    rcfa said:
    Not getting updated, but complemented.
    I doubt the M1 versions will go away just because the M1X versions get introduced, unless Apple will transition to a much more aggressive upgrade cycle across its entire product line, or a repositioning of the MacMini line.
    I'm guessing (and hoping) this will be a Mac mini Pro or something like that. Basically, it will have more cores, but a dramatically more powerful GPU (16/32 instead of 8 cores). If it is much of anything other than that, I'll be pretty bummed. I also kind of hope the renderings aren't accurate, as even with the higher efficiency of Apple Silicon, they'd still need some cooling potential with that many cores. Apple always seems to shrink things a bit too small for heavy use in terms of heat dissipation (aside from the Mac Pro).

    I don’t understand why ppl think it will get the M1 iMac’s mag safe but they wouldn’t integrate the Ethernet port into it and put one in the back of the mini  
    That is a really good observation, and question.

    entropys said:
    That would be inefficient and expensive, and in a mini, chew up valuable real estate. Particularly on a server farm, maybe not so bad on a single server, but would it not be better to have a UPS and as big a battery to power other stuff, seperatey?
    A UPS wouldn't do any good if you pull the plug.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 34
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    MplsP said:
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    A USB-C cable could be pulled out way too easy. It works with laptops that have batteries, but would be a bad idea for powering a desktop.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 34
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,888member
    MplsP said:
    JBSlough said:
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 

    I believe the point was how thin the iMac is. After I looked at one in a Best Buy I realized there wouldn’t be room for the standard way they were connected before. It’s literally just a screen and almost as thin as an iPad. 
    crowley said:
    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    The iMacs draw somewhere around 70-80W of power, meaning that if it was powered by a USB-C cable (currently a 100W maximum) you'd be limited in power supply to any attached devices.  Possibly not a problem for many, but it'd be a bit of an embarrassing limitation for a desktop machine.  Not to mention that they probably want the same or similar design for the bigger iMac that is surely coming, which will likely have a significantly higher power draw.  The PSU that they're shipping is 143W.
    edited August 24 FileMakerFellerfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 34
    thrangthrang Posts: 897member
    If I can get 24-32 GB or RAM along with the additional ports and purported performance boosts, I'm in...
    cgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 34
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    crowley said:
    The iMacs draw somewhere around 70-80W of power, meaning that if it was powered by a USB-C cable (currently a 100W maximum) you'd be limited in power supply to any attached devices.  Possibly not a problem for many, but it'd be a bit of an embarrassing limitation for a desktop machine.  Not to mention that they probably want the same or similar design for the bigger iMac that is surely coming, which will likely have a significantly higher power draw.  The PSU that they're shipping is 143W.
    Yeah, I'd have never even thought of something like this, except the other day, I plugged something into one of the USB-C ports on my mini (Intel) and a dialog popped up about not enough power. (I think I had plugged in a Lightning <-> USB-C cable and was going to charge my iPhone up a bit.) I don't have a lot of power-hungry devices except maybe a Samsung T5 SSD, but apparently I went over the limit.

    Luckily, I have my Blackmagic eGPU, so I just moved it up to that and no problem. But, I hadn't ever encountered anything like that before (even though it makes sense).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 34
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,355member
    cgWerks said:
    MplsP said:
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    A USB-C cable could be pulled out way too easy. It works with laptops that have batteries, but would be a bad idea for powering a desktop.
    First, if you have your desktop set up so it's easy to pull the cable, shame on you. Second, there are plenty of other connectors that could be used.

    crowley said:
    MplsP said:
    JBSlough said:
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 

    I believe the point was how thin the iMac is. After I looked at one in a Best Buy I realized there wouldn’t be room for the standard way they were connected before. It’s literally just a screen and almost as thin as an iPad. 
    crowley said:
    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    The iMacs draw somewhere around 70-80W of power, meaning that if it was powered by a USB-C cable (currently a 100W maximum) you'd be limited in power supply to any attached devices.  Possibly not a problem for many, but it'd be a bit of an embarrassing limitation for a desktop machine.  Not to mention that they probably want the same or similar design for the bigger iMac that is surely coming, which will likely have a significantly higher power draw.  The PSU that they're shipping is 143W.
    As I understand it, the USB power delivery spec goes up to 240W.
  • Reply 30 of 34
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,888member
    MplsP said:
    cgWerks said:
    MplsP said:
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    A USB-C cable could be pulled out way too easy. It works with laptops that have batteries, but would be a bad idea for powering a desktop.
    First, if you have your desktop set up so it's easy to pull the cable, shame on you. Second, there are plenty of other connectors that could be used.

    crowley said:
    MplsP said:
    JBSlough said:
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 

    I believe the point was how thin the iMac is. After I looked at one in a Best Buy I realized there wouldn’t be room for the standard way they were connected before. It’s literally just a screen and almost as thin as an iPad. 
    crowley said:
    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    The iMacs draw somewhere around 70-80W of power, meaning that if it was powered by a USB-C cable (currently a 100W maximum) you'd be limited in power supply to any attached devices.  Possibly not a problem for many, but it'd be a bit of an embarrassing limitation for a desktop machine.  Not to mention that they probably want the same or similar design for the bigger iMac that is surely coming, which will likely have a significantly higher power draw.  The PSU that they're shipping is 143W.
    As I understand it, the USB power delivery spec goes up to 240W.
    The PD 3.1 240W spec was published two months before the iMac was released.  That's not a realistic timescale to deliver.  Maybe they'll transition to it later.
    MplsPFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 34
    stompystompy Posts: 368member
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 
    When Apple engineers decided to make a thin iMac, they created a litany of problems for themselves that they decided to solve with new ideas.
    One "point" of the iMac's magnetic power connector is it's depth: it is significantly shallower than a standard 3 prong port/plug, solving one of these self-created problems.
    (Why don't you show us how a standard power port/plug would look on a 2021 iMac? ;)  )

    FWIW, I never defended Apple's engineering exercises, I only pointed out that the iMac doesn't have "MagSafe" -- this connector is designed to stay connected until you want it disconnected.
    fastasleepcgWerkswilliamlondon
  • Reply 32 of 34
    stompystompy Posts: 368member
    ...looks like I answered this late, JBSlough and others already noted that the iMac's depth isn't a great match for conventional power cords. As for USB-C, the M1 supports 2 USB/Thunderbolt ports. It sure looks like spending one of those on a permanently connected power cord was unacceptable.
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 34
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,819member
    MplsP said:

    First, if you have your desktop set up so it's easy to pull the cable, shame on you. Second, there are plenty of other connectors that could be used.
    Yeah, like the one they designed and shipped in the iMac.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 34
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    MplsP said:
    First, if you have your desktop set up so it's easy to pull the cable, shame on you. Second, there are plenty of other connectors that could be used.

    As I understand it, the USB power delivery spec goes up to 240W.
    I suppose, as far as it goes, but I was just pointing out the inferiority of it as a power delivery connection. Of course it *can* be made to work.
    Just because something can be done ...

    stompy said:
    When Apple engineers decided to make a thin iMac, they created a litany of problems for themselves that they decided to solve with new ideas.
    One "point" of the iMac's magnetic power connector is it's depth: it is significantly shallower than a standard 3 prong port/plug, solving one of these self-created problems.
    (Why don't you show us how a standard power port/plug would look on a 2021 iMac? ;)  )
    Heh, yeah it is a problem they created for themselves. But, we'll see how it goes. <sarcasm> Number 1 on my iMac wish list was certainly 'as thin as an iPad'. </sarcasm> I sure wish they'd focused that energy into adding a video input to make it a useful display.
    williamlondon
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